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Hydrangeas: Blushing Bride (Endless Summer) in Zone 4

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Forum: HydrangeasReplies: 19, Views: 199
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nd_garden_gal
Fargo, ND
(Zone 4a)

June 16, 2009
9:01 PM

Post #6697009

Anyone else in Zone 4 having good luck with the Blushing Brides? I have six, but only see life (from the bottom) on two of them this year. Sad. Wondering about other's experiences?
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2009
12:35 AM

Post #6708170

I am zone 5 and have endless summer. I did winter protect. If you want blooms on old wood you need to winter protect even in zone 5.

Mine started with bottom leaves in April. Scratch the stem and see if it is green at all. Look for bud swells. If not you may have to cut way back.

luis_pr
Hurst, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 19, 2009
5:04 AM

Post #6709296

Yes, you need to winter protect it if you desire reliable bloomage. This plant is only good thru Zone 5 or to quote "USDA Zone 5 hardy, test in Zone 4".

http://www.endlesssummerblooms.com/en/consumer/plants/blushingbride/description
nd_garden_gal
Fargo, ND
(Zone 4a)

June 19, 2009
5:48 PM

Post #6711117

Yes, they were winter protected, but still only 2 came through. I'm giving up on the other 4. The original Endless Summer is obviously much more reliable in our cold Zone 4. My mom's aren't protected and are huge and beautiful, but she's having the same issues with her Blushing Bride's. It is kind of strange, because all of mine came through last year, so to lose 4 of 6 in their 3rd year is sad.
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2009
6:02 PM

Post #6711187

Does your mom get blooms on her unprotected Endless Summers?

I do have Blushing Bride and it is in it's third season for me. It came up fine the year after I planted it, but only had a few blooms..that was an unprotected year. I gave it winter protection last year, and this year it's covered with flower buds, so it should be nice. It seems unusual that it would totally die on you with winter protection, though. I'm really sorry about that.
luis_pr
Hurst, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 20, 2009
9:22 AM

Post #6713916

This happens some times and it is diffifult to guess why after the fact. Some times the plant dries out for lack of moisture in dry winters, other times the leaves used for winter protection settle or decay in mid winter (some people keep a batch of leaves in plastic bags and add more in mid winter. Those are some of the comments I have heard from others in cold zones.
nd_garden_gal
Fargo, ND
(Zone 4a)

June 21, 2009
5:54 PM

Post #6719293

Yes, my mom gets beautiful blooms on her unprotected Endless Summer's (probably all on new wood, but still really nice production). I have decided to replace 3 of the blushing bride's with Forever and Ever White Out - hopefully they will perform better - we will see. :)
luis_pr
Hurst, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 21, 2009
6:42 PM

Post #6719454

The wholesaler reports some cases of leaf spots (a fungal infection) late in the season with this plant but they do not give details (a few spots, a lot, a few but large ones, etc) so just be aware. If you happen to know someone who already has them, check later in the season to see how their shrubs are doing.
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 21, 2009
7:41 PM

Post #6719621

There's a new hydrangea introduced this year in the Endless Summer collection and bred by Dr. Michael Dirr called 'Twist&Shout' that is hardy to zone 4. If Dirr says it's hardy to zone 4 then you can believe it. It's a lacecap. I've got one sitting in its pot waiting for me to get the shovel out. If you like a lacecap you'll love it. I'm not real fond of the name, but I love the shrub.
They are available only in the independant nurseries this first year, so dont look for it at Lowes or any place like that.

http://endlesssummerblooms.com/en/retail/plants/twist_and_shout/description
l6blue
Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4b)

June 29, 2009
3:19 PM

Post #6753675

I have several Endless Summers in my Zone 4 garden. We had a brutal winter last year, with several days below minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit. I did not protect my ESs, and they all came back beautifully.
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 29, 2009
3:26 PM

Post #6753698

I thought we had a brutal winter too, but as I'm seeing hydrangeas around town, it looks like everyone is going to have lots of blooms this year. Many times, I will see the ones in town only having flowers at the bottom, from the top buds dying in the winter or Spring, I presume.

Snapple, I just saw that 'Twist and Shout' at a nursery and I loved it. Trying to figure out if I possibly can squeeze it in somewhere.
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 30, 2009
1:41 AM

Post #6756317

I squeezed one in. For a lacecap it's spectacular. The flowers are about 8" to 10" across. It's gone to the top of my like list.
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 30, 2009
2:01 AM

Post #6756439

Stop! I'm really out of room! I was really taken with the look of it...the flowers did seem hefty to me...not dainty like some of the other Endless Summer varieties I've seen. The only way I could squeeze it in is if I saw thru some roots of a giant pine...hm, or maybe one other corner. Or maybe I could replace some of my daylilies that get too much shade. Ok, looks like I might be adding it after all if it's still at the nursery. And you think that one will give you lots of flowers even without winter protection, snapple?
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 30, 2009
2:16 AM

Post #6756510

Yes. I do believe that it will perform as advertised. As I mentioned before it's a Dr. Michale Dirr introduction. If he says it will bloom on new wood in zone 4 you can go to the bank with that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Dirr

His latest book on hydrangeas ( not listed in the wiki link) is a must have for hydrangea lovers.

http://landscaping.suite101.com/article.cfm/hydrangeas_for_american_gardens
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 3, 2009
10:39 PM

Post #6774009

Here is picture of Twist and Shout...I'm kind of uncertain after all where to put it. Is there any reason I can't keep it in the blue Endless Summer pot it came with and then put it in the ground in September, or is that a bad idea? I kind of like it in this spot, but there are a ton of tree roots from the tall pine here...not sure if I can cut some of those or what. I sure don't want to damage that tree.

Thumbnail by Noreaster
Click the image for an enlarged view.

snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

July 3, 2009
11:34 PM

Post #6774233

I've had mine for about a month in the container and just put in in the ground 2 days ago. My concern about waiting for September is if it would have enough time to root itself into the ground to prevent it from frost heaving. It would have to be heavily mulched. As for cutting tree roots, it all depends. The botanical garden where I volunteer 3 half days a week sure isn't shy about wailing away through tree roots on established trees to plant something. They will move the location if the roots are over 1". But other than that they just hack away! I sure winced at first but now I'm used to it. You should see what they do to a container or B&B root ball before they put it in the ground. The really pull and rip the roots loose. I know better than to let a pot bound root ball go straight into the ground but they way they break up a root ball on all but the weakest rooted plants is just short of destruction. I can do it now but at first I had to ask some of the staff for help. I just couldn't make myself tear them apart like that. The gardens there are just beautiful so they certainly know what they are doing. They keep telling me that "plants are tougher than you think".

I've volunteerd there as a Master Gardener since last August. The education has been incredible. Just incredible. Every single day is a classroom. If you're not a Master Gardener, as soon as life allows, take the course through your County Extension. Then if you have a botanical garden anywhere near you, at least visit. But be careful, it can get into your very soul.
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 4, 2009
12:26 AM

Post #6774425

I know, my mom planted my other hydrangea near this location and she did saw thru a big root...she told me my dad does it all the time in their yard, but it still scares me! These roots crawl along the surface (probably rock ledge under there), and they would definitely be bigger than an inch. Darn, I don't know what to do now.

That sounds like a great volunteer job to have! There is supposed to be a very nice botanical garden somewhere on the mid coast of Maine that I hope to get to one day.
luis_pr
Hurst, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2009
12:51 PM

Post #6776112

I agree, noreaster. You can keep it in the pot for a while longer and move it around if the leaves that are in direct contact with the sun react by turning all yellowish. Keeping it in a pot is what I recommend to others when they are not sure if the sun exposure in one location will be too much during the summer. I have some camellias going through that process right now.

Just remember to mulch it and water it often (I have to do that here every 2-3 days with the temps in the 100s); feed it monthly too (if you do not have those fertilizer pellets already in the potting soil) since the fertilizers will leech out of the pot due to the constant watering. I would plant it as soon as the temps start to go down.

Because of the monthly fertilizer feedings required by the pot, there will be some stems that will not be hardy enough for winter so do not be surprised in the Spring if there are an unusual number of dead stems (the roots will be fine though). Next year, fertilize only once in June and stop all weak fertilizers like coffee grounds at that time too.
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 4, 2009
12:56 PM

Post #6776136

Thanks, luis. There probably are those little pellets, since they seem to come with every plant you buy. I was concerned that the pot seems rather small for a plant that is already pretty big, though. Maybe if I keep it in a pot for the summer I should move it into a larger one.
luis_pr
Hurst, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2009
3:45 PM

Post #6776757

Yes, that would be fine. It is done to lower shipping costs. When changing pots or when planting on the ground, be on the lookout for roots that circle the pot. If the plant is root bound, prune the roots every two inches on the side and on the bottom.

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Other Hydrangeas Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Hydrangea Ayesha Roselaine 9 Jul 13, 2012 2:54 PM
Cutting Hydrangeas anastatia 2 Jul 31, 2007 9:43 PM
"Forever and Ever" Hydrangea toni5735 14 Dec 30, 2008 11:10 AM
I hope this works. Hydrangeas planted in a leaf mix... kbaumle 30 Apr 28, 2009 3:20 AM
How to winter over lace cap cuttings? kbaumle 10 Jan 13, 2008 6:47 PM


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