Photo by Melody

Cacti and Succulents: Blooming Hens and Chicks

Communities > Forums > Cacti and Succulents
bookmark
Forum: Cacti and SucculentsReplies: 52, Views: 521
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
Lala_Jane
North West, OH
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2009
3:56 PM

Post #6768191

In all the years I've had sempervivum I've only ever seen them bloom once before...and now I have 2 blooming at the same time. One 'bud' is still quite small and may not grow to this size, but I was rather impressed by this big one. Can anyone tell me what factors play a roll in making a semp bloom? Is it the variety or the age or the growing conditions? All of the above?

Thumbnail by Lala_Jane
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 2, 2009
3:59 PM

Post #6768209

Hello Jane!
I had a whole bunch of Hen & Chicks given to me, and one bloomed just like yours.
I've since been told that each one is a different variety, and the one you & I have are the same variety, but not specifically Hen & Chicks... I wish I could tell you more...
The ones I had were all in the same sandy, west sun area, and none of my other Hen & Chicks got the stock OR the blooms. Be glad you have this one, cuz apparently you're lucky!

I'm going to search out "blooming cactus" and see what I come up with.

-Susan-

This message was edited Jul 2, 2009 10:01 AM
jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 2, 2009
4:01 PM

Post #6768221

Once they bloom___that's it for that hen. It will die. Semps. are monocarpic, blooming once then dying. In another thread blomma said that at three years the hen blooms and then dies. Hopefully it made some chicks to carry on your crop!! Sometimes the bloom stalks are so large they dislodge Mom and some of her chicks from the weight.

Nice looking planting. Jean
Lala_Jane
North West, OH
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2009
4:08 PM

Post #6768257

Thanks you guys. I had heard that the hen will die after blooming and hoped it wasn't true. But then again I can't imagine a 9" tall hen living indefinitely. LOL. This one started to dislodge from the ground but I kind of propped it up with a little extra soil. This way she can show off her plumage with pride then whither away in glory.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 2, 2009
4:22 PM

Post #6768327

I had mine bloom 2 years in a row, then moved to another city, and I didn't plant it right away, so the whole plant died...possibly was going to die anyway!
I'd never heard of one blooming only once, then dying.
Ah well, learn something new every day!! :-)

-Susan-
Lala_Jane
North West, OH
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2009
4:28 PM

Post #6768343

Susan if yours bloomed twice that would mean they don't die after blooming. Do you recall what happened to it between the first and 2nd year? Surely the part that shot up into the air must have died off?

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 2, 2009
4:33 PM

Post #6768362

I was in Winnipeg, where the winters are harsh, and I just left it alone. Didn't do a darn thing to it. It was the only plant that bloomed, too. The stalk that bloomed died off a bit, but because I'd never had one bloom before, I thought I'd just leave it. I think it fell off, but I don't remember. This was the summers of 2005 and 2006 that it bloomed. I just figured I killed it by not replanting it when I moved in Aug of 2006 to another city...

-Susan-
jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 2, 2009
6:43 PM

Post #6768808

I wondered at the size you gave for it. It probably isn't really a semp. if it didn't die. Is the hen 9" or to the top of the bloom stalk? If the hen is that tall, I doubt if it's actually a semp. unless you've got it on steroids!! LOL

Blomma, where are you my friend; we need you.
Lala_Jane
North West, OH
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2009
8:45 PM

Post #6769299

OMGosh jamlover the semp itself isn't 9". That measurement is to the top of the bloom (and to be honest I'm estimating. I didn't actually measure it but now I'm tempted too. LOL!) I just said I thought it would look funny sticking up in the air like that if indeed it didn't die off. As you can see from the picture they're just plain old ordinary hens and chicks.

It was Talluluah_B that had one bloom 2 years consecutively. This is only #1 for me, but who knows?...maybe I'll get lucky too.
:-D
cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2009
2:12 PM

Post #6772220

I have had them for years and never had any blooms either. This year seems to be every place I look someone has a photo of them blooming. Just wanted to share this great photo I saw on flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/33370260@N07/3678813843/

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 3, 2009
6:56 PM

Post #6773223

wow - a red plant with pink blooms! Beautiful!!
Mine was the exact same colouration as Janes.

-Susan-
Lala_Jane
North West, OH
(Zone 5b)

July 3, 2009
7:27 PM

Post #6773374

That certainly IS beautiful! That reminds me that I'd really like to have some new sempervivum varieties. I've been toying with holding a very small co-op for semps and possibly sedums. Can anyone recommend a wholesale dealer that would sell to me/us? Mountaincrest is about the only one I've found that will sell to the general public and it would be nice to have a couple places to compare price and variety.
jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 3, 2009
8:18 PM

Post #6773570

Did one with Mt. Crest in 2006; at that time we only had to purchase 2 trays. Now it's three.
jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 4, 2009
4:47 PM

Post #6776952

Sorry duplicate post without the link. jam

This message was edited Jul 4, 2009 11:50 AM
jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 4, 2009
4:50 PM

Post #6776961

Check out North Hills Nursery. They were recently having a two for one sale. Buy one and they send two. Three of us were able to add a number of plants by dividing up the second plant they offered.

http://www.northhillsnursery.com/Specials.html
krowten
Greensburg, PA

July 5, 2009
6:42 AM

Post #6779385

Lala, I've been waiting for someone to start a semp coop with MCG. I want to seriously expand my collection of heuffelii's and they have (wholesale) trays of 50 for under $50.00.

So to explain:

"heuffelii" is Semervivum/Jovibarba heuffelii, sometimes considered a Sempervivum and sometimes considered a separate family "Jovibarba"

Heuff's do not die after blooming forming large clumps.

Heuff's typcially do not set chicks on stolons. Instead they set chicks on a common root sometimes described as "corrot-like" and must be divided if you wantseparate plants.

MCG offers 24 types of heuff's, including the largest one, the smallest one, and 22 other ones many considered desirable and have been in the hobby for decades.

Their wholesale tray consists of 10 different heuff's, 5 of each kind and you can select the kinds you want.

Their semp tray consists of 84 plants, 12 kinds in qty of 7 each for about $80.

I've been toying with the idea myself of doing a MCG coop (but really don't want to - just want the plants!), so would really like to see you or someone else do oen. But looking ofr a bunch of heuff's.

Below is a pic of a heuff (var "Mars") which is a dark colored one.

Thumbnail by krowten
Click the image for an enlarged view.

HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 5, 2009
7:40 AM

Post #6779431

There was a Co-op last year I participated in run by Hillbilly_Gran, the plants came from MountainCrest here is a link to the old co-op thread.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/838778/
I planted some of them in my old boots and some mixed pots but didn't have luck keeping them over winter in the house. Some went into my new wall construction but I really don't think any of them made it either. They were nice looking plants and she took some real good care in the packing and marking. They looked good all summer long but with the wall construction and everything I just didn't get them planted in the wall outside early enough before winter set in and I had way too many plants inside last year and lost them as well.
krowten
Greensburg, PA

July 5, 2009
11:15 AM

Post #6779560

Holly, I know about the coop but found out too late last year to get into it. Semps need a lot of light and just don't do well indoors for very long, except in some unusual circumstances. I sympathize, trying to keep my ee's and some Oxalis going through the winter in western PA is always too iffy. My ee's complain a whole lot.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 5, 2009
11:42 AM

Post #6779618

Yes, All my house plants did poorly last winter. I they usually do much better as I have a passive solar home with alot of glass. I didn't get the plants properly debugged in the fall when I brought then in and I battled spider-mites, aphids and scale most of the winter. Plus I brought in alot more plants than I normally do so they were much more crowded than usual. At the holidays I have to move them into an upstairs room for several weeks and that never helps.
Lala_Jane
North West, OH
(Zone 5b)

July 5, 2009
2:07 PM

Post #6779891

As it turns out within minutes after making my post about a possible co-op I saw that estrail1rider was considering the same thing. I suggested Mountaincrest to her as a possible vender and I think that's the route she's going to go. Originally she was just looking at sedum but I think I've twisted her arm into ordering some semps too. I'll hold off doing anything crazy until see how this plays out. LOL.

Krowten I'm not familiar with heuffelii. Thanks for the tutorial! I'm guessing by your location that they would be winter hardy for me too. That would be wonderful as it would open up a bunch of new varieties for me too.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 5, 2009
9:12 PM

Post #6781393

Jane - I'm in zone 3a, and have been able to overwinter them here, in Calgary, and in Winnipeg. Some are native to the prairies (Prickly Pear, and Pincushion) and will overwinter very nicely. No special care is needed.

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 7, 2009
3:30 AM

Post #6787487

Hi Jean, I heard you calling all the way to Wyoming so here I am. Haven't had much time lately to read and post.

First answer, Sempervivums are hardy to zone 4, possibly need some protection in zone 3.

If a Semp growing in full sun or part sun has never bloomed, it is not a Semp.

Even the common green Semp tectorum blooms and dies during its 3rd year. I have a bunch of them growing along my fence to keep down weeds and many are sending up flower stalk.

In contrast, if one blooms, and don't die, it is in a different family of Semps, or one that looks like a Semp but isn't. They are easily confused with the genus Echeveria, which are also called hen and chicks due to the runners they send out.

As krowten mentioned above, Jovibarba heuffelii blooms every year but don't die. This is a different variety in its own genus of Jovibarba.

I have 90+ vaieties of Semps and many are now sending up flower stalks. Pretty yes, but those are now doomed to die. I don't welcome flowers on mine since I know the outcome. I also remove the stalk since it is heavy. If the young chicks are rooted, I remove the dying hen to allow the chicks more room and light. She needs to be cut out, rather than pulled since babies may be attached by stolons even though they may be rooted. IF the last set of babies are still small and unrooted, I leave the hen until fall.

For those of you who haven't seen this photo of my Jovibarba heuffelii 'Boro', I am posting it again. This one retains its color all year. It is several years old and just sending up bloom stalks for the second time.

I found out that Mountain Crest sells under Squaw Gardens. I ordered mine last year from SG and the returned address was from MC.

Sempervivums are not native to the prairies anywhere. Today's varieties are hybrids. They were produce by man from native species that originated from the mountains of Europe, plus the common green tectorum, which is a natural specie. It was long used in Europe. growing on roofs before the invention of shingles. Also suppose to keep out evil. Sempervivums cross breed extremely easy and don't come true from seeds, which is what have given us all the beautiful hybrid varieties.

Lilly

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 7, 2009
3:33 AM

Post #6787495

And here is an updated photo of 1/3 of my collection. Photo taken June 20, 09

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 7, 2009
3:17 PM

Post #6788836

Hiya Blomma - actually semps don't need any special care in zone 3 or 3a
As I said earlier, I've grown them in the open in both Winnipeg, and Calgary, and they come up beautifully and larger every year.
If I weren't at work I'd post a pic of my hen & chicks garden. It's lovely.
I'll try to remember tonight.
jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 7, 2009
11:29 PM

Post #6790517

blooma, that J.heuff. Bora is really something!! And look at all of the blooms coming!! I'm going to have one of those!! How big will the clump get if you don't bother to divide it?

One of my smallest divisions____of a heuff.____that I made in May is deciding to bloom. Really surprised me. In semps we usually see flowers on the larger plants.

Like your Mars krowten. Was that from your Edelweiss order?

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 8, 2009
1:49 AM

Post #6791266

This is my Hen & Chick garden.
It's only 2 years old, so it's got some growing to do.
The large one in the corner is a bit of one that my neighbour grew. Her's were getting so large they were clumping 4 plants high and couldn't grow sideways anymore lol

Thumbnail by Tallulah_B
Click the image for an enlarged view.

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 8, 2009
9:42 AM

Post #6792204

Here is the photo of Jovibarba heuffelii 'Bora' in full bloom. I have no idea how large it will get if not divided.

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 8, 2009
12:11 PM

Post #6792430

Isn't nature amazing! Even on your Bora it isn't the largest heads that are blooming like it would be on a semp.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 20, 2009
12:03 AM

Post #6839239

Some of you may have seen my pot of semps. I picked up these pretty stripped semps for a $1 at a small local nursery. I've had it a couple of weeks and a few of them are starting to bloom. Will probably separate the entire pot when it is done.

Thumbnail by HollyAnnS
Click the image for an enlarged view.

krowten
Greensburg, PA

July 20, 2009
1:16 AM

Post #6839568

The striping you mention is called "watermarking" and is relatively common among Sempervivum, when they are growing well and healthy. While some semps will watermark readily, others do so seldom or not at all. I think it is more noticeable on larger semps.

While I do not know for sure and have yet to find a reference that definitely describes the cause, I believe it is the result of a plant undergoing rapid growth when conditions are varying substantially. does anybody have a reference where this is addressed as to cause?
kassy_51
Marinette, WI
(Zone 4b)

July 21, 2009
6:21 PM

Post #6846904

Boy this was interesting.
Our hen and chicks is 3 years old and full of buds. I was wondering what made them blossom, because my mom had a bunch of them, and they never blossomed.

Thumbnail by kassy_51
Click the image for an enlarged view.

krowten
Greensburg, PA

July 21, 2009
9:00 PM

Post #6847546

Some varieties bloom often and others seldom. It is commonly held that you can trigger blooming by giving lots of room, good conditions, and removing all chicks. Once the hen has bloomed, it will die. However, you can sometimes trigger additional chicks to form by removing the bloom as soon as you detect it. This will not preserve the hen that is blooming, but can cause additional plants to form. This is very uncertain but does sometimes happen according to the literature. So if you are interested in more plants and not the flowers, remove the flower buds as soon as detected.
kassy_51
Marinette, WI
(Zone 4b)

July 21, 2009
9:20 PM

Post #6847633

Well this one has a bunch of chicks if you can tell in this picture.
My boyfriend got this one kind of as a joke, but it ended up being a very pretty joke. He got it from my daughter-in-law, about 3 years ago when he started rasing chikens...LOL
We have done nothing special to it, and as you can tell it is kind of crowed, but it doesn't seem to mind it.
Thanks for the info. I had someone else ask when they saw the picture of it, so I told them to check out this forum :)

Thumbnail by kassy_51
Click the image for an enlarged view.

FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2009
1:00 AM

Post #6848639

Hi everyone.

I took this photo today of a blooming Hen that's now 14-1/2" tall and as an experiment I decided not to separate the chicks since there were 2 Hens in the same pot I got back in March. When the 2nd Hen began to bloom, I did cut the chicks loose so I'm waiting to see how my experiment goes and the other chicks fair.







Thumbnail by FruitOfTheVine
Click the image for an enlarged view.

krowten
Greensburg, PA

July 22, 2009
1:12 AM

Post #6848711

The chicks should do fine, whether or not attached to the dying hen. Some growers prefer to detach the chicks form the blooming hen to prevent the hen form uprooting the chicks if it topples over.
kassy_51
Marinette, WI
(Zone 4b)

July 22, 2009
3:31 AM

Post #6849461

WOW

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 22, 2009
7:30 AM

Post #6849803

If the chicks are small and yet not rooted on their own, I leave the chicks attached to the dying hen until they are rooted. I just finished removing the heavy flowering stalks on all my hens to prevent the babies from being uprooted by the leaning flower stem. I do this every year.

Hens that are old die whether you leave the chicks on or not. Nor will they produce additional babies if they are removed. Mother Nature knows what she is doing while providing growing room for the chicks left by a dying hen.

I have noticed something interesting. Each season, the chicks are produced between a different level of leaves on a rosette. The first year's chick seems always to come from the lower leaves. The next year's chicks from one level above.The last litter of chicks are produced between the highest set of leaves. IF I'm not mistaken, there are 3 levels of leaves on a rosette that produces chicks during it's lifetime. The first season, a young chicks doesn't produce unless it was formed early in the season. It then may produce some late in the season. This often depends on the variety. Some are slower to produce, than other. Larger-growing varieties seems to produce later, and fewer chicks, in life than smaller varieties. In larger vareities I found that the babies are often larger when "born".

I have tried rooting the flower stems. They rooted and all that was produced was more flowers. No chicks.

If I am correct in this, it would seem like a good way to figure the age of a hen. Have anyone else noticed, or paid attention to where the chicks are produced yearly.

A hen will bloom with maturity and sun. However, that raises another question. If a hen don't bloom from lack of sunlight, or not enough, will it die anyway? Mine are all in the sun so never tested that theory. I do know that a Semp not receiving enough sun, don't produce the beautiful colors they were hybridized for.

Below is Goedele, a large-growing variety. This particular one has formed a twin growing from the same stem. Another plant from this one grows normal. Notice the large chicks held high in the air until their weight will lower them to the ground to root. This one will have twin flower stalks.

This message was edited Jul 22, 2009 1:42 AM

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

txaggiegal
Belton, TX

July 22, 2009
11:32 AM

Post #6849978

Great thread...finally discussion about a succulent that does not have spines.

I just bought from Squaw Mountain and I give him high, high marks...fast, good packing, and sent extras! I even sent special requests as to preference in coloration and they responded very positively. I thought their prices were really good...of course, we do not have semps in our nurseries in Central Texas, sooo...maybe I do not know much about the pricing. SM price theirs out at about $4/per with some group purchases, sales, etc. How does that measure out for multiple tray purchase? or participation in a co-op.

jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 22, 2009
12:22 PM

Post #6850096

Sounds right on for pricing. I prefer a plant with chicks forming which can be had for 4 to 5 dollars. Some received this year have set many chicks and had a parent hen bloom as well. It let's you see the whole scene in the first year!!
txaggiegal
Belton, TX

July 22, 2009
1:53 PM

Post #6850414

It does give you the entire spectrum...but I really liked that each of the semps had 3 to 5 chicks still attached so I had some perspective on the time left to bloom for the mother plant. Beautiful coloration...
krowten
Greensburg, PA

July 22, 2009
6:19 PM

Post #6851504

Blomma, I read in the Sempervivium Journal that hen's blooming is (at least partially) dependent on the variety of semp. The article was lamenting the introduction of types that bloomed too often, thus making it more difficult to maintain adequate numbers. Some bloom often and others not. I believe that they are more authoritative than our opinions.

I have never experienced a semp producing chicks after removing the flower as I seldom do this until the hen has died. However, please keep in mind that I was repeating what I had read elsewhere. I certainly intend to research further into this for my own edification. This summer I will lose a large, very beautiful, unidentified rescued semp which, although small when I got it last year, went straight to flowering this year. The flower spike is at least 10" and I am letting it develop so that I can try some seed to see if one of the offspring might be similar. I've been taking pictures and intend to post a thread with its story, once complete.
jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 22, 2009
11:50 PM

Post #6852660

Well, I've got a semp that doesn't know the rules. Chicks on the outside ring___next year nearer the center. Notice the chicks that are just starting to form near the center of this one. There are still a couple on the outside ring and I've removed a couple. Must not be true in every case!!

Edited to add or it's doing two years growth in one year!! Oh, no___don't want that!! Name is Pilatus



This message was edited Jul 23, 2009 8:45 AM

Thumbnail by jamlover
Click the image for an enlarged view.

krowten
Greensburg, PA

July 23, 2009
1:15 AM

Post #6853026

JAM, my King George is doing something similar. I'll have to get a pic, it's even worse than yours.

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 23, 2009
4:34 AM

Post #6853860

krowten, as you know I have a large collection of Semps---90+. I know the ages of all since they are all growing in one spot. I keep strict attention to what will bloom and die to be sure I don't leave myself without babies. You see, I have been selling Semps for 5 years, the reason I pay such close attention to them. I don't know about other varieties, but the 90+ that I have seems to follow what I have been saying all along---3 years max.

I have also purchased for 4 years from Squaw Garden and have received a few varieties that bloomed later in the year, and some the next. These were small-growing varieties so hard to tell how old they were when I got them. They came with chicks so had to be more than a year. Who knows who packs them and don't know any better.

Speaking of this company, I will not order from them anymore. Too many miss-labeled varieties over the last 3 years. When I order one variety that I have and it turns out to be completely different in color, it is miss-labeled. Or else the one I had is. On the other hand, I have one called Larissa, another called More Honey growing within 2 ft of each other and never moved. They are the same in color and growth. Which name I should use, beats me. I have ordered from them since 2002 without problems. Now looking for a new source to purchase from next spring.

Jean, that is interesting. Keep us posted on that one with babies way up. How old is the hen? I really would like to know if my theory is right or wrong. I have never had a hen develop chicks up high when young. Always start from the lower leaves.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2009
4:52 AM

Post #6853931

I could have sworn that I post this earlier.
Wanted to say this is a very interesting discussion and I am picking up a lot of good info. Thanks everyone.
FruitofTheVine, That is impressive.
My pot is putting out 3 blooms right now. Here is a close up of the first one.

Thumbnail by HollyAnnS
Click the image for an enlarged view.

txaggiegal
Belton, TX

July 23, 2009
11:49 AM

Post #6854362

Blomma, thank you for the info on Squaw Mountain...I will keep looking...you say you sell?...are those available via mail...? Finding the right nursery is just as hard as finding the right husband!!!
jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 23, 2009
1:54 PM

Post #6854721

blomma, I just acquired the plant this year and it had 5 chicks starting around the outside. I've removed the largest and planted them beside mom. Now this new growth is coming right in the center. I'm actually wondering if the silly thing will actually bloom later on this summer. Sure hope not.

We are having an unusually cool summer. Highs only in the low 80's and lows setting records so my semps haven't decided to take a nap yet due to the heat. Normally we would be in the low 90's by now. Looks like all of the western US is getting lots of heat however. Iowa's corn crop sure isn't getting the heat that it needs to thrive!!
kassy_51
Marinette, WI
(Zone 4b)

July 23, 2009
6:19 PM

Post #6855878

blomma, can you take a guess at what vaieties this one is?
I was just wondering if you might know. I have no idea
Thanks ^_^

Thumbnail by kassy_51
Click the image for an enlarged view.

BajaBlue

BajaBlue
Rancho Santa Rita, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 23, 2009
7:19 PM

Post #6856099

While looking for something
else the other day, I came
across this site and was
impressed with all the
choices. Check it out !

http://www.geocities.com/cavendish_perennials2002/perennials.htm

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 24, 2009
5:52 AM

Post #6858185

kassy_51 Hi. I would guess it if that is the color it has remained---green tipped maroon---it is the common chick by the name of S. tectorum. I have it growing along my fence to keep weeds down. It is a large-growing variety and dependable in setting chicks. Turns more maroon in the winter. See below for photo of mine.



This message was edited Jul 23, 2009 11:56 PM

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 24, 2009
5:54 AM

Post #6858187

Same variety in April.

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jamlover
Delhi, IA

July 24, 2009
2:41 PM

Post #6859139

blomma, do you bother to remove the dead hens under your fence or leave it on it's own? How long can something like that be left without it getting so thick that there isn't room for any more chicks? We just fenced around my vegie plot and I put sedum cuttings along the base of some of it. Am wondering about using semps.

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 24, 2009
11:17 PM

Post #6861128

jamlover
These have been growing along my fence for almost 6 years. Yes, I remove the dying hen when it send up a flower stalk along with all its leaves. The chicks thrive and those on top just sends down longer root stalk. They take the heat from the sidewalk without harm. They do get watered along with my roses and Irises growing along the other side of the fence. The Semps also keeps the water from running on to the sidewalk since they sort of form a dam wall.

When I started them along the sidewalk I planted them 6" apart. I also added low Sedum but tore that out since the Semp did the job better.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Cacti and Succulents Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Jade plant - too big for pot Rosalia 20 Dec 28, 2009 10:21 PM
Cactus Receipes Crasulady2 27 Jun 15, 2007 4:59 AM
Interested in seeds for unusual cacti and succulents Lavanda 2 Jul 7, 2008 8:45 AM
Another Succulent ID please henryr10 28 Dec 10, 2009 10:59 AM
Epiphyllum Curly weeding 5 Nov 9, 2009 3:31 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America