Photo by Melody

Woodworking: Restoring an 1884 porch. Can anyone identify the wood?

Communities > Forums > Woodworking
bookmark
Forum: WoodworkingReplies: 18, Views: 309
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
David_Paul
Clinton, CT
(Zone 6b)

July 10, 2009
8:54 PM

Post #6803366

This area on the eastern Connecticut coast was clear cut by the early 19th century so I assume the wood is not from nearby. Perhaps upstate a little. Any idea what this wood might be? Columns appear different from the deck. Grain looks nice with water splashed on it so I hate to paint it but assume that was the way it was done in 1884.

Thumbnail by David_Paul
Click the image for an enlarged view.

David_Paul
Clinton, CT
(Zone 6b)

July 10, 2009
8:58 PM

Post #6803384

Close-up of the deck

Thumbnail by David_Paul
Click the image for an enlarged view.

David_Paul
Clinton, CT
(Zone 6b)

July 10, 2009
9:04 PM

Post #6803408

Some of the bases have rotted out but the columns are in good shape. Same wood as the deck or something else?

The shrub between the porches is Heptacodium miconioides. White flowers with a honeysuckle fragrance in late summer followed by bright red calyces. Exfoliating bark.

http://whisperingcraneinstitute.wordpress.com/2007/02/12/heptacodium-miconiodes/

Thumbnail by David_Paul
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jvdl1
Englewood, FL

July 14, 2009
5:51 PM

Post #6818689

It looks like pine to me.
David_Paul
Clinton, CT
(Zone 6b)

July 14, 2009
8:29 PM

Post #6819267

jvdl1...someone mentioned pine. A species that doesn't have the knots some other pines do (I selected an area with a knot...most of the boards are clear). They weren't sure of the name however...Larch?



This message was edited Jul 14, 2009 4:42 PM
jvdl1
Englewood, FL

July 15, 2009
4:36 PM

Post #6822748

Paul, all pine woods have knots, on some trees the knots are farther apart than others, a knot shows where a branch was growing. A tree growing in a tall forest will have fewer branches than a tree growing in an open area. Slash & Loblolly heart pine & southern yellow pine were commonly used for flooring, most other pines are too soft for floors. I cannot tell by the picture which type of pine you have, all 3 are southern long needle pines,
John
dixiegril
Jesup, GA

July 24, 2009
12:04 AM

Post #6857064

I believe it is hard pine. That seemed to be the wood of choice for that period. It is popular to this day.It is a solid hard wood. Stands the test of time.
David_Paul
Clinton, CT
(Zone 6b)

July 26, 2009
7:02 AM

Post #6866118

Dixiegril...it sure has held up well (lead paint helped too I think). Got most of the paint off and I'll post a photo in a day or two (I loaned out my camera!)...very pleased that, after 125 years, there is very little that needs to be replaced.
dixiegril
Jesup, GA

July 28, 2009
7:27 PM

Post #6876415

Good luck on your reno. The hubby and I are trying to remodel our house. We are trying to do the work our selves whew! There is a lot of work involved. Keep us updated as you progress and send some pics. along and along. I love old homes they, just don't put the workmanship in them like they did back then.
David_Paul
Clinton, CT
(Zone 6b)

July 30, 2009
2:12 AM

Post #6882897

Its a slow process isn't it? But they did build well. The basement amazes me. They used smaller stones below ground level but large blocks of black granite for what could be seem from the outside. They must weigh a ton each. Not a local granite either. This area of CT is known for pink granite. That would have been the obvious choice. But the owners wanted to show off I guess.

Thumbnail by David_Paul
Click the image for an enlarged view.

slugbait
Marysville, WA

August 2, 2009
2:29 AM

Post #6896053

there is a good possiblity that if the house was built for a wealthy land owner of the time that it could br cypress Bald Cypress or Swamp Cypress. It is possable to look at the end grain with a 10X lens for a positive ID.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 7, 2011
4:58 PM

Post #8679045

I wonder if it isn't oak which is a hard wood great for flooring. Also popular in the East during the 1800's
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 7, 2011
5:01 PM

Post #8679052

I'm so sorry to report that my friend, David Paul, died on 11/30/10.
jannz2
Pilot Point, TX
(Zone 7b)

September 11, 2011
4:28 AM

Post #8803190

Hello 'pirl'...

I just happened across this post and found the discussion interesting about determining this type of wood. I'm so sorry to hear about the loss of your friend 'David Paul' who had started this thread.

I sincerely hope that you are at peace with his passing. My Mom has recently passed-- back in January -- and this quote helps me;

"To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die".

Best wishes to you...
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 17, 2011
5:28 PM

Post #8812643

Thanks, jannz2, and I'm so sorry for your loss.

I do believe that quote is true and another that says something about if you're remembered fondly then you do live on.

David was a kind and good friend and I'll always remember him with good thoughts. I feel privileged to have known him.

Carolina_Mike
Whitesburg, TN
(Zone 6b)

September 5, 2012
7:43 PM

Post #9266449

Hi. This wood is quarter-sawn heart pine. There is no such thing as 'hard' pine. Pine is a 'softwood'. It is true that old pine wood is very hard to drive a nail through, but it is still not a hardwood like oak or maple. All evergreen trees are softwood...all deciduous trees are hardwood; regardless of how hard it actually is to dent or drive a nail through. Here is some trivia for you; what is the hardest wood in North America? Give up? Not hard rock maple, not red oak...it is apple. Yes, the fruit tree.

When the settlers (white man) came to the Americas, there were virgin pine forests everywhere (virgin means no white men had violated it...yet) . Look up some of the old pics of loggers in the 1800s. Here is a good example: http://logdays.com/log/thumb.htm

"Heart" pine means that the wood was from the reddish center sappy area of the tree, not the outer yellowish area. Only long-leaf pine has a heart big enough to cut boards from. The heart never rots, bugs don't eat it, and water doesn't penetrate it. But, it burns VERY well. A long-leaf pine tree that is 5 feet in diameter will have a heart about 6" in diameter. The wood in the center of a tree has the fewest and smallest knots. And, in pine trees big enough to have a large heart area, the grain would be as straight as you have ever seen.

Heart pine is an extinct type of wood. No one is going to plant pine trees and talk their great-great-great, etc grandchildren into not cutting it for 500 years. What was cut over 100 years ago is all there is and all there is probably going to be...as long as capitalism still exists.

If you want to confirm that it is heart pine, cut a splinter about 3" long, the size of a pencil at the big end, and tapered to a point on the small end. It should smell like turpentine. Now, get away from the house and light the small end with a match or lighter. It should flame up vigorously and emit a solid black smoke. It will also crackle and 'sweat' as it burns. Careful, it is the same thing as fat lighter kindling. Fat lighter usually means it came from the root or a solid knot. Heart pine comes from the center of the tree, but the composition and flammability is the same.

Hope this helped, Mike
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 5, 2012
7:47 PM

Post #9266458

Thanks for the post, Mike, but David died 11/30/2010.

I'm sure others will appreciate the information you provided.
Carolina_Mike
Whitesburg, TN
(Zone 6b)

September 10, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #9271370

WoW. Missed that part. Sorry for the loss.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 15, 2012
2:30 PM

Post #9276086

Thanks. He truly was a joy to know.

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Woodworking Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Woodworkers unite! drdon 104 Mar 26, 2007 11:23 PM
Let's see your shop! drdon 64 Feb 16, 2009 2:15 PM
extreme birdhouses and more from recycled wood cranbrook2 222 Feb 27, 2012 5:37 AM
What woodworking projects are you planning? drdon 24 Sep 2, 2009 3:28 AM
Halloween Projects ezylivin 49 Oct 13, 2009 4:08 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America