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weedy vine, taking over: ID help please

Lula, GA(Zone 7b)

I hope this is not bindweed: I read once that if you have that, the control is to MOVE. :(
This is all over a huge clump of forsythia. I live in a rural area, woods and pasture. We have kudzu nearby but this is not it.

And it's about to bloom!

Any help appreciated. All the descriptions I saw/read just weren't clear to me.

Thanks!

Thumbnail by cedar18
Nilwood, IL(Zone 5b)

Looks like some kind of an Ivy. BEV

West Pottsgrove, PA(Zone 6b)

It might be Carolina Coralbead or Moonseed, Cocculus carolinus, a US native:

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=COCA&photoID=epca5_001_avd.tif

http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/plant.asp?code=W840

Lula, GA(Zone 7b)

CLAYPA - I think you are right! I will be on the lookout for the seed, very showy. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to have any wildlife value :( but at least it's native. Amazing -- I think I know a bit about native plants and then I encounter new ones that I've never seen on any hikes or rambles.

Thanks so much. It is actually pretty, but it looks like it has monster-tendencies.

West Pottsgrove, PA(Zone 6b)

Well, the USDA site says "moderate value for large mammals", which really makes me wonder what animals they're referring to... lol...and the Johnson Wildflower mentions birds eating the fruit.

http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=COCA

Lula, GA(Zone 7b)

Thanks claypa. I had seen the part about large mammals (hmmm, Bambi?) but not about birds. I wondered though since the fruit is so showy. Glad to know it has the attribute. We have lots of large deciduous trees but not enough understory. We have planted hollies, paw paw, beautyberry and other berry plants but want more! So perhaps this vine will join us - but we'll have to set strict curfews. :)

Council Hill, OK

That is Smilax rotundifolia, bull briar, greenbriar, cat briar. It is actually edible, no I haven't eaten it....yet.

West Pottsgrove, PA(Zone 6b)

Cedar18's plant doesn't appear to have thorns, or parallel leaf veins - pretty sure it's not Smilax.

Lula, GA(Zone 7b)

No it does not have thorns. But I do have PLENTY O'Smilax. It is truly the devil's spawn.

Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO(Zone 5b)

It sounds like Georgia has lots of invasives. is that cause it's such a great place to live?
~smile~

West Pottsgrove, PA(Zone 6b)

Smilax is considered "weedy", but it's native so it's not an "invasive" plant.

Lula, GA(Zone 7b)

I guess it depends on your viewpoint. I've always thought Ga. is actually a much better place to live, then visit. Atlanta, I'm thinking of, is not a great city to my mind (and I am a native of N. Ga._.

Smilax is weedy and invasive and native. So there to all viewpoints!!
Yes, hanseycollie, it is a great place to live, at least here above the "gnat line." We luckily have a great climate (although a bit TOO hot in July and Aug) and many plants find it likable.

Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO(Zone 5b)

It seems those on DG in Georgia have awesome gardens, or so it seems, but many invasives too. Here in Missouri, and in Minnesota (home planet) I don't think we have as many invasives, maybe with the winter freezes. I could be way wrong, just speculating.

Lived in Atlanta as a child off Heards Ferry Road and Riverside? It is a beautiful area - we shopped on Roswell Road. My parents loved it, I was too young to really care, LOL.

Lula, GA(Zone 7b)

Hanseycollie, yes we do have many invasives. Our long growing season is the culprit. I remember reading years ago in a gardening mag where someone up north, Minn. I think, thought kudzu was a great summer vine!! Of course, here, it eats acres every day -- before your very eyes. But there it is killed back completely. I guess the same happens with some bugs.

I know Roswell a little and it's very nice, near the river. You wouldn't recognize the big A now. It's a huge sprawling city-thing.

Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO(Zone 5b)

We lived in an area called Riverside near the Chattahoochee River. And I am originally from Minnesota so yes, kudzu is beautiful to us from the Frozen Tundra. Of course, when your temps go from 70 above to 70 below in a few months, I don't think invasives are much of a problem, LOL. Unless, of course, it's invasive aqua-life from lake to lake. Now that is a real problem there, very sad too.

Christiana, TN(Zone 6b)

Quote from claypa :
It might be Carolina Coralbead or Moonseed, Cocculus carolinus, a US native:

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=COCA&photoID=epca5_001_avd.tif

http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/plant.asp?code=W840


claypa is correct. I've also seen it called Carolina Moonseed vine. I have one very beautiful vine of it climbing a Black Locust along with Rosa Climbing Clothilde Soupert. The best way I've found to get rid of the vines I don't want is to cut them back to the ground but leave enough above ground to spray with stump killer being careful to not get any on desirable plants. It may have to be done more than once but it is killable. The roots go deep and a long way. But persistence pays off.

Lula, GA(Zone 7b)

thanks for the followup killd- I'll keep an eye on it.

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