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Irises: Weed Control in your Iris Beds

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lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

July 29, 2009
2:31 AM

Post #6878179

I am always looking for some way to keep the weeds out of my iris and daylily beds. There is an article in the latest AIS book dated July 2009 that may help somewhat. The article is on page 30-31. Of course all you professionals already know about all this stuff.
I'm going to do exactly what all they did and hopefully in a couple of years I will no longer have to hand weed. (grin)

Happy Gardening everyone, and I hope your iris and daylily beds are weed free in the near future.
Marian
Elizabethtown
Hagerstown, MD
(Zone 6a)

July 29, 2009
2:36 AM

Post #6878202

Huh? What did "they" suggest?

Roni
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 1, 2009
10:38 PM

Post #6895151

I'm not a professional so spill it since I don't have access to the AIS book:lol: I had a banner year raising a bumper crop of weeds this year so I would love to hear what "they" suggest!
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

August 2, 2009
12:03 AM

Post #6895425

What I use in the commerical beds is one year Ronstar and the next year

D
glevely
Sanford, MI
(Zone 5a)

August 2, 2009
12:10 AM

Post #6895447

Dee (one year Ronstar and the next ) what is Ronstar and what did you do the next ??? I'm confused as always ;0)
Gloria
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

August 2, 2009
1:03 AM

Post #6895687

Ronstar is a pre emergent 60% than Preen and right now I will have to get the other chemical bottle out and let you know what it is.

One chemical I love is Stinger which here is 138.00 for a quart but you only use one ounce per gallon and you can spray right on the iris to kill such things as clover and thistle...

You get these at farm co ops where the farmers go to buy their chemicals. We get ours at Wilco farms,

D
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 2, 2009
1:05 AM

Post #6895697

Do you have to have a license to use any of those chemicals? I work with a lady who farmed tobacco and I know she had to have a special chemical license in order to use some of the stuff needed for her crops.
glevely
Sanford, MI
(Zone 5a)

August 2, 2009
1:09 AM

Post #6895724

thank you Dee I'm not SO confused now I'll have to see if I can find some around here
Gloria

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 2, 2009
1:51 AM

Post #6895911

Iris foilage isn't smoked. Our weeds are very happy.
lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

August 2, 2009
2:19 AM

Post #6896010

LOL I'm so glad I checked back to see what others had written. I love it Dee when you stop in mid stream with the other treatment. I laughed so hard I nearly had an accident. LOL I'm glad someone besides me can't remember everything. What am I talking about...I can't remember ANYTHING. I wake up in a new world everyday. Don't laugh it's the truth. My poor husband says I wake up in a new world every few hours.

I'm going to google Stinger and go get me some in the next day or two. I always have a bumper crop of clover every spring in the iris and daylily beds. (BIG FAT FROWN) I just hate pulling them out and fighting with them along with the other weeds.

Hey IrisMA, don't give anyone any ideals, they might roll some iris leaves and see what effect they have on em... I've heard of folks smoking grapevine leaves so who's to say they wouldn't try irises? I think young people will experiment with anything and everything.

Happy Gardening, I'm going Googling S T I N G E R!
Marian



irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

August 2, 2009
3:38 AM

Post #6896277

NO license for Ronstar or the other chemical and I will think on it tonight...and get back to you.

D
\
Starts with either a T or D
:)
elladan6
Madison, WI

October 15, 2009
10:12 AM

Post #7171125

I am having trouble finding Stinger.
Anyone know a place that I can mail order it from?

Elladan
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

October 15, 2009
12:54 PM

Post #7171394

I believe that it is a Dow Chemical product.

D
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 17, 2009
10:19 PM

Post #7180291

I was clover free for a few years then this year I've got a huge layer of it covering my flower bed. I know they are deep little bulbils and break like cheap china when you try to get them out...
I had such a nice thick 3 inch tall layer that it made the perfect hideout for a snake to move in and hide around under the clover canopy:lol: One of my neighbors told me they saw it and I practised the avoidance technique--ignore it:lol: I'll have to do something to get rid of all that clover. My neighbor's sister wants some of it! I told her unless she has a big area she wants covered, I would grow it in a container on concrete:)
elladan6
Madison, WI

October 18, 2009
11:56 AM

Post #7181814

Yes, it is the clover that is so much trouble. Getting rid of that alone would be a big help.

So, I can just order things right from Dow Chemical? I am not so sure about that.

Elladan
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

October 18, 2009
9:49 PM

Post #7183283

Stinger is very expensive, but you can get it from SaveonChemicals.com if you really want to sink the $ into it. Yes, it does work well. Here's a link to the listing:

http://www.saveonchemicals.com/index.php?doc=moreinfo&id=446
Delightful_Dawn
Altus, OK
(Zone 7a)

October 20, 2009
12:05 PM

Post #7189386

Here is the following caution with regards to using Stinger in areas where it could contaminate groundwater...

"The Stinger label contains the following advisory statement: "Clopyralid is a chemical which can travel (seep or leach) through soil and under certain conditions contaminate groundwater which may be used for irrigation or drinking purposes. Users are advised not to apply clopyralid where soils have a rapid to very rapid permeability throughout the profile (such as loamy sand to sand) and the water table of an underlying aquifer is shallow, or to soils containing sinkholes over limestone bedrock, severely fractured surfaces, and substrates which would allow direct introduction into an aquifer. Your local agricultural agencies can provide further information on the type of soil in your area and the location of groundwater."

http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/herb-growthreg/cacodylic-cymoxanil/clopyralid_mono_salt/clopyralid_let_404.html

Anytime you use chemicals it is wise to do some research to make sure it will not adversely impact YOU or your environment.

Dawn

lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

October 23, 2009
10:33 PM

Post #7201490

Weed control update.
Ok, as some of you might remember here awhile back I got some Hi Yield to use over the top of my irises and daylilies for weed/grass control.

Here's the scoop, it did kill all the grasses growing in the beds. Of course when the grass was about 2 ft tall it just all fell over on top of the irises. The good thing was that it was very easy to pull out of the beds and you could see there was nothing lurking in the grass.

There were some weeds that it did not kill. These of course were something that I could pull up with little or no problems. I have some photos on the camera but as you know I have to go to town and get them put on a cd so I can share them with you. Bottom line for me, I was VERY PLEASED with the results regarding killing the GRASS in my iris and daylily beds. I will be using this stuff again next year. I also bought some Preen to try in different areas. I'm going to test a couple of different things and hope to be able to compare the results to one another and then I can decide which one works best in my area.

Let's all work together to keep all iris and daylily gardeners informed as to how to be weed free. We've come along way but there's still tons of information that needs to be shared with everyone regarding how to save time maintaining our gardens and have more time to enjoy them. (grin) No I'm not dreaming, if we all work together we can accomplish and overcome some of the useless and time consuming chores of hand weeding gardens and flowerbeds.

Happy Gardening My friends, Marian
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

October 25, 2009
5:00 AM

Post #7205837

Marian, which Hi Yield product did you use? Hi Yield would probably be much more cost effective than Stinger. Also, did you have any nutgrass among your weeds? Did the Hi Yield get the nutgrass too? That blasted nutgrass is my arch nemesis. I've used spot treatments of Round Up on it, but that's just so time-consuming to go from weed to weed to weed. I'd love something I could broadcast on the bed that would take care of the nutgrass but not kill the plants! Thanks for any info, Evey =)
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

October 25, 2009
2:41 PM

Post #7206409

Thanks for the feedback, Marian. I'm going to ask for a report from you in the spring, and then if everything looks good I'm going to try the one I have, Ornamec.

One of my biggest problems is I love ornamental grasses, and have a lot in my flower beds, and these products will kill them, too.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

October 25, 2009
2:45 PM

Post #7206419

Lots of grasses in some of the iris beds--definitely not ornamental. Where does one buy corn gluten? DH didn't like the Preen description on the container. I realize that it is for seeds, not grown weeds or grass.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

October 25, 2009
2:53 PM

Post #7206437

I've used Preen for many, many years, Lucy. I read the label, it scared me, as they all do, but since so many people were having such good luck with it, I tried it, and have been using it since. It really works well.
elladan6
Madison, WI

October 25, 2009
2:55 PM

Post #7206440

Corn gluten has too much nitrogen for iris to be happy.
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

October 25, 2009
4:57 PM

Post #7206779

yup, you have to weed first, then put down the Preen. the iris society gals here always use Preen, but after reading the bottle, I have not. but this year, with being too sick to weed, the weeds have killed so many irises that I'm ready to use just about anything. I have heard you can't let any Preen actually fall onto the rhizomes.
elladan6
Madison, WI

October 26, 2009
6:28 PM

Post #7210515

we use Ronstar rather than preen. It is harder to find and costs more. But has good iris safety.
I hate the smell of it, so have never used it at home.

(so when I say we, I mean the club uses it on the convention beds.)
irisawe
Kansas City, MO

October 26, 2009
7:15 PM

Post #7210679

Oh boy, I read bonjon's comments after I used the Preen I had just purchased. I felt so good about not only treating the iris beds but others.

Then I read the final comment about not getting any on the rhizomes!!!!!!! TOO LATE!! Is this for real? Have I just damaged all my iris I am trying to save from weeds?? I broadcast it by hand and was very happy with the ease of it all, but now I may have done harm.

Please, any of you that have experience with it, tell me, have I just reallllly messed up or what?

Irisawe
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

October 26, 2009
7:29 PM

Post #7210723

just to be on the safe side, Irisawe, I'd take something like a basting brush and go brush off all the rhizomes I could reach. Preen works by effecting a seed's ability to put down roots.
lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

October 26, 2009
9:48 PM

Post #7211224

Ohhhhhhh no, I have no ideal about that irisawe. I bought some preen but I have not used it yet. I'm always afraid to try stuff on my irises and daylilies. I'll see if I can find the bottle for the stuff used to kill the grass and then I can tell you if it kills nutgrass.

I hope that the preen doesn't harm your irises.
Happy Gardening, Marian
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

October 26, 2009
10:27 PM

Post #7211366

I've had Preen fall on my bearded irises many times, and it never hurt them.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

October 26, 2009
11:44 PM

Post #7211645

I use Ronstar which is much stronger than Preen and it falls on the rhizomes all the time, without one bite of harm to them. I usually put it down when rain is expected in less than 24 hours or water it in.

D
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

October 27, 2009
12:34 AM

Post #7211829

well, if it's stronger than Preen, then she's probably ok with it on the rhizomes, right? that's good info to know.
sharondippity
Gainesville, TX

October 27, 2009
12:50 AM

Post #7211893

Is Ronstar a granular? Do you buy it in bulk. So you have ballpark figure on price per acre. Do you use it twice a year fall and spring? Where do you buy it. Do you have to buy large amounts, as in 50 lbs? or more.
irisawe
Kansas City, MO

October 27, 2009
2:20 PM

Post #7213334

Pollyk,

Thank you!!!! It did rain the next day and even though the ground was still saturated from past rain I thought well, maybe it would wash off the rhizomes somewhat. It is great to know I can put that anxiety to bed altogether.

Thanks again,

K
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

October 27, 2009
3:10 PM

Post #7213460

Ronstar is grandular bags are 50# cost 80-85.00 a bag takes 5 bags to do 1 . 5 acres. Ends up being cheaper than Preen for me. Do it both in the Fall and the Spring. Fertilize in the Spring

Get it at the feed stores where farmers get their chemicals...

D

bonjon
Raleigh, NC

October 27, 2009
6:49 PM

Post #7214089

on my way to pick up Ronstar. hope it's not to late in fall for now. we're about two weeks away from first frost.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 19, 2009
2:18 PM

Post #7289372

LURK...
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
2:34 PM

Post #7289417

Quit lurking and c'mon in, LOL. We're a friendly bunch. Welcome.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 19, 2009
3:01 PM

Post #7289479

LOL! Thanks!

My iris beds are a nightmare. Between the too wet and the grass I am all but about ready to give them up for pasture.

Cant always use chemicals due to the wet, cant always weed and I swear, if I want to keep any bearded, they are going to have to go in containers!

Weeds here are anything from thistles to raspberries, to bull nettle, to grass, clover, did I mention grass, and clover.. more grass, more clover! LOL! oh, and poison ivy...lots of PI!

Poor soil... Oh about the only thing they will get that is good is sun in the summer, but anyother time its too wet and if they are not in a raised bed, they are toast in poor soil.

Tried Preen... dint work. Preen and Miracle (kill) Grow are not my friends.

Ornamec worked on the dayliles, cant remember if it was useable on the iris..you need a PAL for application. Roundup works, but you cannot hit what you are trying to save it in Pro strength kills all.

Ok, back to lurking! (Great thread BTW!)
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
3:04 PM

Post #7289488

I am going to give the Ornamec a shot this year. Supposedly it's OK for irises. What do you mean it needs a PAL for application? I'm so scared to use it. But the grass in the beds is horrible.

No lurking!!!!!!!!Posting only!!!!!!!!
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 19, 2009
3:10 PM

Post #7289501

P = Private or Pro
A = appplicators
L= LICENSE

Chemical certification to apply. You may also need it to BUY certain chemicals.

State regs probably vary.

*sticky* !!!!

Back to lurking...

UM, before lurking.. FEAR is a good thing! :^)
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
3:15 PM

Post #7289514

I bought Ornamec over the internet, no license needed. I have a nursery, and it's not on my list as needing any certification for use. I've never had any certification for any chemicals, as I've done fine with the standard ones.

Yes caution at least is a good thing.

So, you had good luck with the Ornamec?
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 19, 2009
3:23 PM

Post #7289534

When I can apply it yes, in the daylily beds it has worked and you can spray over the top of the days and no problema! We do use a brush killer for the Raspberries but try not to get that on anything nearby.

Since I flood though application of anything is a MAJOR issue generic, pro or handweed! (I hate kneeling in water! I have been known to yank poison ivy by hand, but kneeling in water... noooo no no no! LOL!)

As with any chems, read the label.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
3:27 PM

Post #7289545

Oh, believe me. I must have read the label ten times, and still not used it. I sell beardless irises, and if I lost them from a chemical use, what a horror. I haven't even brought myself to the point where I could try a small area, but of course that's how I will start.
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

November 19, 2009
6:37 PM

Post #7290141

just do it, Polly. you can do it. just a small area. try it and report back to us. try it on something you have a lot of, and try it on only a portion. that way you won't lose something altogether.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
9:46 PM

Post #7290626

I know, I know. I just don't want to lose anything, I guess.
MissIrisbert
Taylorsville, KY

November 20, 2009
7:26 PM

Post #7293253

Polly -- it won't hurt them! I put it on a bed where I had mixed TB's, SIBs and Spuria. Grass is gone, iris is lovely. The only problem I had is with the grass gone, the thistle's decided they had a lot of room to grow and I ended up with monsters! But the grass is GONE! Just do it!

Sue
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
7:33 PM

Post #7293277

Ok, I will just do it!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 22, 2009
8:17 AM

Post #7298867

Sedgehammer works really great on the Nutgrass.

http://www.pestproducts.com/sedgehammer.htm
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 22, 2009
6:28 PM

Post #7300071

Did you say nutgrass?? Oh man, if I sprayed for that I would not have grass in some spots! Its a power plant here! Some places thats the only area that anything will grow! Im stuck with that grass!
enidcandles
Enid, OK

November 23, 2009
4:42 AM

Post #7301922

I just ran on to your thread. This is my first fall for irises. I dug up a bunch of peach ones and that of course turned into a 50 x 4 land of the unknowns. Anyway, my biggest problem is bermuda. I fight crab grass, clover, dandelions and henbit too. I sprayed some of the henbit in the yard with one of the weed killers from lowes. I can look and see what it was later. I sprayed on Friday, and just came home awhile ago so have no idea if it is working yet.

Here is the cool part. I don't know much - I am not really careful with anything - I have no money in my bed and am willing to be the guinea pig. If you want me to that is.

I hadn't really thought about weed control in my iris bed yet. Oops, I guess I didn't think about that part.

Anyway, if there is something out there you want to experiment with and I can afford it - I will try it.

Or, you can tell me how to kill my bermuda and I will go away.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 23, 2009
3:28 PM

Post #7302152

Aaaaah the world loves a guinee pig! Too funny!
Mshadow
Houghton Lake, MI
(Zone 4b)

November 24, 2009
4:15 PM

Post #7305853

Anxiously awaiting results. My tall bearded have been taken over by grass. The Preen is wonderful for just weeds. In the spring I weeded and put the Preen down. Thought I had dug up all the stupid grass, but the runners underground must have multiplied and now I can hardly see my irises. Too cold and wet to get out there and do anything. I will try to get an early start in the spring and want to try something to kill the grass. I have been following this thread and glad it was posted. Too many irises, too little time. If only I could quit my job then I would have more time to weed.. LOL..
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 24, 2009
4:50 PM

Post #7305987

I'll try the Ornamec in the spring and report back.

Thanks for offering to test enidcandles. That darn Ornamec is pretty expensive, though. One pint was 44.00.

Here's pictures where someone used it, and it certainly did kill the grass. They apparently thought it was for bermuda grass only.

I do have some ornamental grass in the beds I'll have to dig out first. What fun that's going to be, they are huge.

Even if you could quit your job, MShadow, you would want to make bigger and bigger beds, and not weed. I know what us gardeners are like.
lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

November 24, 2009
11:22 PM

Post #7307010

update on my over the top grass killer. It worked very well as long as all you wanted to get rid of was the grass. The other weeds were not effected by it. The grass still had to be pulled out but it was very easy to do so as it became very brittle and just broke right off. I guess the best part is that it didn't grow back.

Now all I have to contend with are the winter weeds. (frown) I will use the over the top grass killer each spring from now on are whenever the grass starts to grow. This time I'll make sure I use the stuff before the grass gets out of hand. LOL

Happy Gardening, Marian
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 24, 2009
11:29 PM

Post #7307034

So looking back up the thread--that was the product called Hi Yield, right? That one for killing grass and Preen for regular weed control? Hi Yield sounds familiar--wonder if I've seen it somewhere I've shopped...

My bed and even containers get overrun with this weed with fast runners, rounded leaves with scalloped edges that is a nice medium green. That stuff goes everywhere.
lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

November 24, 2009
11:43 PM

Post #7307093

Yelp, I used the Hi Yield Over the Top and it killed all the grass and left everything else unscathed. So provided the plants bloom normally I'll continue to use the Hi Yield every spring/summer to keep the horrible grass out of the beds.

I used the above product on both my irises and daylilies and it didn't harm either.
The beds do have winter weeds coming up in them. I guess I should have used something earlier to kill them. (frown) At least they are not as bad as the bermuda grass and other grass that takes over during the heat of summer.

Good Luck with trying it on some of your beds.
Marian
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 25, 2009
12:25 AM

Post #7307207

Sounds like a winning product...
sharondippity
Gainesville, TX

November 25, 2009
12:34 AM

Post #7307236

hi yield...granular or liquid? where did you buy it in Texas?
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 25, 2009
1:16 AM

Post #7307364

Thanks for the report Marian. It makes me feel safer to try it now. Grass is my biggest problem, so that will be a tremendous help.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

November 25, 2009
1:21 AM

Post #7307381

Who makes this product & what type of store sells it?
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 25, 2009
1:33 AM

Post #7307403

I got mine on the internet. The Ornamec. I assume they are all similar. make sure if you're getting the High Yield, you get the grass killer only, as they make other products. Hi Yield Grass Killer is the same as Poast. You need to use a spreader/ sticker also.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 25, 2009
2:59 AM

Post #7307585

Dmac, Is this the weed you are talking about?

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/52043/
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 25, 2009
11:55 AM

Post #7308194

Yes, on one side of my apt (the side that gets more shade and moisture) that stuff has really taken over. I neglected my bed up front for a bit and now have a lovely green carpet of this stuff invading. Easy to pull up but it never seems to end:lol:
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 25, 2009
1:29 PM

Post #7308339

dmac, the only way to get rid of it if it has invaded a perennial bed is to use some broadleaf weed killer using the "hands of death" or a similar application technique. I just treated a large patch in the area of my big bed that adjoins my neighbor's property. They have it all through their lawn and it always creeps into my bed. Pulling it never gets it all. I used to pull it continuously. Now it gets the chemical treatment, and that is really keeping it out of my bed.
enidcandles
Enid, OK

November 25, 2009
3:55 PM

Post #7308701

dmac - that looks like henbit to me. I am fighting that myself now. I use Spectracide and it is working good on the lawn. If you don't kill it now, you will have it until it gets hot enough to kill it next spring/summer. I have not sprayed any on the beds themselves though. If you would take an old milk jug and cut the bottom out of it, you could spray into the top and get the henbit only that way.
Good luck - that stuff is pretty nasty and if you don't get control of it there is more and more every year.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 25, 2009
4:25 PM

Post #7308776

Unfortunately, it wraps around and grows right through and among the perennials. Spraying it will not get those parts without harming the perennials. It sets down roots all along the ground. It can take over an entire lawn in one summer. I too have found Spectracide to work very well on it, but that will harm perennials.

Wiping it on the weed is the only way to kill it without harming your perennials. Put on a pair of rubber gloves. Put on a pair of cotton gloves on top of the rubber gloves. Thoroughly wet the fingers and palms with the spectracide. Run your hands over and especially under the weed. Do not saturate the gloves to the point of dripping.

The Milk Jug is a good method to use if it's not really close to your plants. I also use half gallon, quart, and pint bottles depending on how much space is between the plants. Another good shield for the plants is to take a large thick piece of cardboard and hold back the perennial plant's leaves and then spray the underside of the weed.

If it's really bad, you may have to tie your perennial foliage up to do the spraying and leave them tied up until at least 1 rain or 1 good watering has washed the spectracide off of the top of the weed.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 25, 2009
10:49 PM

Post #7309818

Holy cow! Looks like I have a job cut out for me! I don't have a ton of perennials above ground at the moment. Hosta has died back, peony has died back, I've got one dahlia blooming and the TB iris leaves are still upright.

I'm not sure what happened over the past year or so--more weeds in there than I've ever had. Clover w/ pink flowers and that weed and a couple of other tall ones. Looks like I need to hit HD or Lowes soon.

Thank you all the for advice!
enidcandles
Enid, OK

November 26, 2009
2:13 AM

Post #7310368

That's the problem with the henbit and clover. If you let it go, the next year there is more, then more the next year and then oh crap, it took over. If you have that much of it, it think I would cover the perennials with a cardboard box and spray the crap out of the weeds. A trash bag would also do the trick if the wind is not blowing. Unfortunately, you are correct, you need to kill the henbit soon or you can forget it until next fall. Henbit comes up in the fall and has to be killed off when it is young otherwise your options are pull it by hand (which won't kill it cause you can't get the whole tiny tuber out) or Round Up.

I feel for ya!! Good Luck.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 26, 2009
4:59 PM

Post #7311689

Thanks:) I think I know what I'll be doing on the weekend:) I'm going to do the hand pulling first and then do some touch up "painting" on the bits still inbetween so I have a little more control of it.

Appreciate all the good info here:)

Happy Thanksgiving!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 27, 2009
4:53 AM

Post #7312783

dmac, you really shouldn't pull it first. It needs the leaf surface to transmit the poison down into the stems and roots. Leave the stuff there to die for at least a week to 10 days after applying it.

This message was edited Nov 27, 2009 12:03 AM

This message was edited Nov 27, 2009 12:05 AM
enidcandles
Enid, OK

November 27, 2009
5:03 AM

Post #7312813

I agree with stormy, you can pull it only if you just don't want to look at it. Pulling is not an effective method of controlling henbit. It is my opinion that henbit is a nasty, evil, vile little weed. Kill all you can now, treat with roundup this spring and hope for the best.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 27, 2009
5:45 PM

Post #7313937

Roundup is a systemic.. it will kill most all it comes in contact with.. DO NOT USE IT OVER THE TOP if you are trying to save your iris and you need to be very careful using it NEAR anything you do not want to kill because the overspray could get it.
enidcandles
Enid, OK

November 27, 2009
5:54 PM

Post #7313956

Blossom - we had discussed using milk jugs, cardboard trash bags... to protect existing plants earlier in the thread. It is not an easy task but can be accomplished.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 27, 2009
5:58 PM

Post #7313969

That's the only way to do it, enidcandles.

Another thing you want to know about Roundup is that if the weed your killing has roots entangled with a prize flower, it can hurt the flower. I've had it happen.
enidcandles
Enid, OK

November 27, 2009
6:00 PM

Post #7313978

That reminds me - I have bermuda here in good ole OK and there were pieces of it that went through both iris rhizomes and canna bulbs. I figured it would come out went everything was separated but nope - it grew through!
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 27, 2009
7:11 PM

Post #7314120

I know about trying to protect the other plants.. but RoundUP being a systemic.. as someone just said, it gets the good plants with the bad from ANY contact the chemical makes itself or through another nearby source. Above ground or otherwise. That is what a systemic is.

And another source could be anything.. a plant, or you get it on your hands, or the jugs, or cardboard and that touches any plant and it could kill it. RoundUp is ok if you do not have a huge weed issue and you spot spray and are away from the prize plants. You should then still protect those plants nearby from drift but not when there is a massive weed pile up. The mass of weeds make it impossible to protect a prize bulb.

RoundUp known as a total kill chemical with the exception of certain plants like soybeans that might have been genetically engineered for being able to be sprayed with that particular chemical. You have to READ the label. This is also why people go take the PAT and have licenses to apply chemicals.

You would almost be better lifting the bulbs, to replant. Do a total kill on the area and wait the recommended time, then replant. Dont for get the weather restrictions too. I dont think there are any "Roundup Ready" Iris. But who knows, things are moving fast in the art of genetic engineering science.. I for one dont have any! And I have yet to hear of that kind of chemical unless Monsanto has made it and I am unaware.

The RoundUp you get over the counter is also not full strength like what the pros use and then have to play rocket science to dilute and spray. But even though it is not that potent, you still have issues with that product on certain plants and application.
enidcandles
Enid, OK

November 27, 2009
7:36 PM

Post #7314177

Well, by golly, it is high time they make roundup ready flowers!! The farmers get all the good stuff.

I should also be able to snap my fingers and make bermuda go away but so far...nothing!
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 27, 2009
8:00 PM

Post #7314241

LOL! Been twitchen my nose for years and that dont werk either!!

Well, no the farmers dont get all the good stuff. About the only thing they keep getting like religion is the shaft from the government.. but, well, Im retired from it so what do I know... (dang, I miss farming.. but I dont miss the.. a-hem...!)

Now whar did I put that innertube.. im still trying ta figure out how to make old age more comfy. Seems about the only thing we dont get subsidized in is healthcare and retirement. The last 401k paid for the repair on the old 3300 and the tax man ate us alive when we sold the farm... go figure.

dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 27, 2009
8:38 PM

Post #7314357

I really hate using any chemicals:lol: Honestly I really haven't used anything on any of my garden except Mircle Grow, Messenger and insecticidle soap:LOL: Think I'm going to stick to diligent weeding---I've gotten rid of them once and I'll do it again:lol: Still gonna work in the Preen though. The other stuff sorta makes me nervous:)

Thank you all for the advice--think I need to read up more on all these chemicals before I mess with em:)
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 27, 2009
8:53 PM

Post #7314392

dmac, Preen works on annual weeds, not the perennial weeds.
enidcandles
Enid, OK

November 27, 2009
9:52 PM

Post #7314537

Good luck dmac, I am a "better living through modern chemistry" kind of girl myself. Maybe if you keep the soil turned it will die??
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 27, 2009
10:37 PM

Post #7314655

Funny, enidcandles! I guess I'm with you. My inspection requires I use some chemicals, and I can't say I use any willy nilly, but when they take the work out of weeding, I'm all for them.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 27, 2009
10:45 PM

Post #7314674

pollyk, may I ask what requires said use of such chems? Key operative word "reqiuire"?
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 27, 2009
10:47 PM

Post #7314684

Yes, I sell beardless irises and must spray for aphids.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 27, 2009
10:56 PM

Post #7314695

Did that answer your question, or were you looking for something else? I thought about it, and not sure I understand. My irises will not pass inspection to be delivered bare root out of state unless they are inspected for aphids, and no aphids are found. As aphids are very common in beardless irises, the only way to totally eliminate them is to spray. I need an inspection certificate attached to the outside of the box I'm mailing them in attesting the irises are disease and insect free.for some states like California and Arizona. My inspector issues that to me on a twice a year basis.

If I'm not answering you correctly, please let me know.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 27, 2009
11:21 PM

Post #7314744

I know the last post wasn't directed towards me but--Home gardener here...no worries re: inspections:lol: I may try something eventually but until I'm more familiar with the various products and what I'm personally comfortable using I think some weeding will have to suffice:lol: I know all of you are much more familiar and informed than I am but even so there seem to be alot of varied info and recommendations:lol:
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 27, 2009
11:37 PM

Post #7314783

Well, it was just weird to me when you said you were required to spray! (Key operative word... required) If you dont have them, then spraying is a waste of time and money! You obviously then have a headache with the aphids! Ergo why you spray.

Never ceases to amaze me in the world of gardening, when a dollar bill is attatched to something as in the case of a plant and sale.. how the business is regulated, but yet there are millions of home gardeners mailing plants every day without any inspection what so ever.

And here we thought the government was doing this to protect us from bugs. Seems to me, all the government is doing is dipping into our pockets a lot of times when it comes to inspections.. But then that just might be me. But then I too have seen a lot of inspections that the inspectors have come in and walked with blinder s on and well.. whats the point.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2009
12:05 AM

Post #7314845

Nope, no headache here with aphids. It's just a common thing on beardless irises, so we spray. And we have gotten some irises from other companies in states where they are more common that have had aphids on them. Thankfully I got many of my irises this year from Dee, and no aphids at all on her plants.

I have not seen an aphid on any of my irises. Not one. But just let the inspector find one, and I can't get the inspection certificate to ship until he comes out again, which could be three months. And they are so tiny, and hide down in the folds of the irises.

So, does my inspector require me to spray for aphids since I have none? NO. Will he give me an inspection certificate if he finds an aphid? NO. So, I guess I would say, 'I' feel required to spray.

My inspector hardly walks in with blinders on. He gets down and dirty here, and I think Dee will tell you they are pretty stringent there also. I don't know where these lax inspectors are, but I would not appreciate a lax inspection. I want to know if something is wrong.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2009
12:07 AM

Post #7314853

dmac, you're definitely right. And I always find the least toxic alternative before using any chemicals.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

November 28, 2009
1:33 AM

Post #7315046

Since I ship overseas I have 4 inspections BEFORE I can ship anyplace. The first one is a walkabout, if she spots anything she tells me and might even suggest what to do. She knows other than roundup I hate alot of chemicals so I use soap for many things and it works.

The other three are walkabouts that are placed every 3 weeks for 3 times before I can ship overseas.

On the overseas boxes she must SEE the iris and I line them out on the table and she looks at them and lucky for me has passed me every time, but I never question her, if she wants me to dig so she can see the roots on a plant it is dug!

One way you can get aphids from a seller is simple while they are sitting in the airports they are not at the greatest temps and if one box has it they travel. Look at it this way. Have any of you taken flowers in for judging and you KNEW there was not one bug on it when you placed on the table yet when it was judged there was a nasty old bug, will it just liked your flower better. Remember the old saying, it is always greener on the other side:)

My soil is even tested once a year, and I must pay for it unless I am drawn for not paying.

D

pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2009
1:58 AM

Post #7315109

Same here, Dee. If my inspector wants to see roots, we dig. He even carries a shovel in his truck. And he usually wants to see roots. We dig, and then he opens the leaf folds and really checks the irises out.

We don't have a soil inspection though. Any irises I ship are bare root, and any plants are in soiless mix, but I guess it makes sense, in case there is a little dirt left on the irises, which when your shipping beardless clumps it's hard to get every speck of dirt off. But in NY it's not required.

I don't know what the overseas order inspection consists of, as I've never shipped overseas, but I was told it would take an hour to do at least and I would be charged by the hour.

And I'm very friendly with my inspector. We both started with the state at the same time, and have a lot to talk about, plus he's a really good fair guy. I can't imagine dealing with him if I did not keep my iris beds bug free, though. He would be a stinker. So for someone to have an inspector come in and walk around with blinders on boggles my mind. I hope never to buy plants from those states. If you have a nursery your inspector can really be a great help to you. I don't have a greenhouse, but I can just imagine the inspection in those.

And as far as money goes it's included with the yearly nursery fee, so I really see it as helping the nurseries, and the people buying from them, not dipping into our pockets.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 28, 2009
3:47 AM

Post #7315393

Well, that is how it should be, but I tell you what, truth be known its not like that everywhere.

If they are going to do inspections then do them and do them correctly. We would like to see that after all, we pay good money to have the advise of the inspectors, but it does no good to anyone if they are done improper. And I am sure we have all paid good money for our educations be it the schools of time and hard knocks or some diploma.

I dont mind paying for something if I get what I am paying for.

Our inspector was a decent guy and we always got good advise, but its not just the inpsectors that need to know what is right its the operators too. No one in this businness knows it all. That is impossible. We all go hand in hand. IF you dont know, there is someone else that will.

I absolutely as an operator hate pouring good money into bad. It hurts my operations. Doing something for nuaght does no good to the bottomline in any business. Being required is one thing, and doing out of necessity is also one thing. Im not saying cut corners because I beleive if you take good care of your operations and your equipment, it takes care of you. Its bad enough everyone gets stung on inflation. And it gets harder each season to run any operation more efficiently and cost effective. Farmers.. some have been literally regulated to death. Where others are so overlooked and should be shut down, they keep running and why, because it then gets political. You cant tell me it does not happen, I have seen it. And in the economics war, its not fair to anyone.

In a perfect world and If money was no object, we could all spend ourselves into oblivian, have the perfect garden and be pest free, disease free and so on and so forth. Of course if the world was perfect then we would not need the assistance of inpections.

Sadly, what also happens is you can have all the inspection in the world and the nextday, the proverbial grasshoppers or some plague comes in and well you dont know your a carrier and its too late. YOu got your certificate and wham, you ship and oops, stuff happens. Its like someone just said, your the flower in the flower show and.. well, there you go! So much for control! You were clean coming in... but the bug landed on you!

I have seen buggie plants at Wallmart...were they shipped that way to the store. probably not, but they hitched a ride someplace and you cannot put a glass dome over the whole outdoor part of the store. Do they dump their shelves when it happens? I cannot answer that one, but I know what I will walk out of with when I leave the store. It could be empty hands or a a handfull of plants.. but I tell ya what, I might not always catch the bug on the plant or I might also not know what it is I should be looking for and as for the clerks at the store giving nursery advice... hmmmm.. hard telling if any of them know anything other than how to punch the key to a register...

But anyway, so much for the ins and outs of the business. Some days it can be really really good and other days an utter disaster. When conditions are ripe for a fungal or pest, well, somedays you cannot move in on it fast enough.
Pegwesttx
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 28, 2009
12:25 PM

Post #7315983

Pollyk, What do you spray on your iris to kill the aphids? (sorry if this has already been mentioned but since I came into the middle of this discussion I couldn't find the answer.)
Peg
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 28, 2009
12:32 PM

Post #7315997

Just curious.. have you tried ladybugs? They consume aphids. But its a betterbug vs a bad bug thing and organic. Or will your inspector frown on that too?
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2009
1:12 PM

Post #7316060

I use Orthene systemic. Again, I have not seen any aphids, this is preventative. The two most common pests to the beardless irises are thrips and aphids, and I've not had either, but Orthene would take care of either, plus any borers, luckily we've never had a problem with them, but beardless irises do get borers also. . Ensata Gardens recommends Cygon 2E systemic.

We have tons of ladybugs, however this is not a controlled enviroment where beneficial insects can be used effectively. We're surrounded by farmers fields and woods, and the irises are big beds. I'm sure any beneficial would flock to wherever the bigger insect population would be, deserting the poor irises.

I prefer not to use sprays as we do have so many insects, birds, snakes etc. in the area, so go with the systemic. I apply it in the spring. The systemic, of course, only works on the insects that suck on the iris plants.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

November 28, 2009
1:55 PM

Post #7316135

Interesting,. Thanks!
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

November 28, 2009
3:39 PM

Post #7316352

Boy Polly I can not image any commerical trying to use ladybugs because I would think you would need a very controlled area for that.

I use dacinol for leaf spot or soap for everything, and so far so good.

I have kitties and wild animals and do not want to harm them.

D
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2009
3:45 PM

Post #7316360

Same here with the animals, Dee. That's why I feel the systemic is safer. I will check into the soap, though. I use that for houseplants. But with the systemic you apply it once, water it in, and I feel it's quite safe.

How many ladybugs would it take to do 63 acres, LOL? No, I don't know of any commercial growers that use beneficial insect control other than in greenhouses.
Pegwesttx
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 28, 2009
3:47 PM

Post #7316366

Dee, What soap, what strength and how do you apply it to such a large amount of iris?
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2009
3:48 PM

Post #7316369

I release Ladybugs every year and they are not as easy as everyone thinks. After they eat the current population of thrips and aphids, you have to give them a reason to hang around until the next generation of bad bug eggs hatch. I purchase lures and houses for them to use until there is more food available.

I must admit though, I get great enjoyment out of seeing them hanging by the hundreds on the rosebuds eating their little hearts out!!
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2009
3:56 PM

Post #7316383

I would think they would be very effective on thrips and aphids, but how on earth would I ever keep them in the garden beds when I have about 6 acres of gardens surrounded by acres and acres of woods and fields. And I guarantee the woods and fields have more bugs than the gardens.

Every fall we have the asian ladybugs storm the garage. So many they just cover the garage. And where are they when I need them, LOL. Out in the woods, I bet.

And Like I said, I haven't found one thrip or aphid on the irises yet, so what's going to keep them here? I do have roses, and have seen aphids on them. I shoot them with a hard water spray. But I don't have many roses.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2009
4:03 PM

Post #7316395

Yup! That is the problem. I use the Lacewing flies too, but that is even more work. They have to be released every 2 weeks. I push it to 3 weeks. The bugs are also an expensive form of insect control.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

November 28, 2009
4:17 PM

Post #7316425

What I do and it has worked well for me, is per gallon of water 3 T dial soap and 1 T sticker. Spray alot of times because of the rain here in the PNW but it does have an outside benefit the deer do not like the taste that much so the daylilies look better.

We have seed farmers on 3 sides and just another property in front. They all use sprays that I do not like that is why I do what I do.

Hey Blossoom what state do you life in? and what kind of business did/do you have?

D
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

November 28, 2009
4:35 PM

Post #7316461

having trouble remembering other folks have to "release" ladybugs! LOL they swarm hereabouts.
lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

November 29, 2009
12:33 AM

Post #7317385

Lots of Lady bugs here too. I'm just greatful that I don't have any wild pigs here like one of my good friends has only about 10 miles from me. They root up anything and everything around her place. It was bad enough earlier in the month when I had the armadillo diggin up everything. Thank goodness it has now gone to the great place in the sky.(grin)

Some people do use the weaker strength Round Up on their iris beds and for the most part it does not kill them. If you don't use it at the right time it will damage them and the bloom on some will be deformed. I think you can look up photos of irises that have been sprayed with round up. I have used it before over all my irises and it did not harm any of them. I'm fairly certain that it was a big iris hybridizer that suggested it to me, or I would have never considered using it. The thing about Round Up is that it comes in several different strengths. If someone were to use Round Up for Brush and Poison Ivy I'm sure it would kill the irises.

May your gardens be weed free in the near future. As for me, I'm still working on getting there. LOL It's a never ending job as far as I can tell.

Happy Gardening, Marian
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

December 2, 2009
3:41 PM

Post #7328218

LOL! amardillos and wild boars! and I thought it bad that our OCD deer would yank up a newly planted iris, taste it, and toss it!
Mshadow
Houghton Lake, MI
(Zone 4b)

March 2, 2010
4:21 AM

Post #7598626

Since it is getting close to that time of year for many (not here yet), I thought maybe some of you would get some helpful info from this thread from last year. :)

BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

March 2, 2010
11:18 PM

Post #7600580

Ladybugs?? Got tons...indoors and out 365/365...dont have to get any, they stuck around all the time! Asian, reds, all kinds...
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

March 3, 2010
2:51 PM

Post #7602104

yeah, around here ladybugs tend to swarm, and it'll soon be that time. But I don't ever see many in my garden. When they swarm, they put off an unpleasant odor. Won't drive you away, but once you've smelled it, you don't forget it, and it's the reason not to have them swarm at your house.

so what is this about using a weak strength of RoundUP in the iris bed? maybe I should sit up and take notice of this
earthspinner
Tranquillity, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 3, 2010
5:20 PM

Post #7602476

Since I am on a smaller scale,,,we got out this last weekend and pulled weeds out of the boxes. Everything came out with ease.
I tell you there is nothing like a weed in the middle of a Iris and your poor DH pulls up the weed and the Iris too,,,looks around real fast to see if I am looking. Plants it back as fast as he pulled it up,,,I said nothing,,,TILL,,,He did it again at that point I just laughed,,,What was I to do,,yell at him?,,,he was pulling weeds.
The walk way area I was hoping the bark we put in would deture the weeds a lil,,it did not. Thats going to have to be sprayed.

BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

March 3, 2010
6:00 PM

Post #7602551

LOL!! I wish someone would train the ladybugs not to swarm my house. they come inside, I got them in lightfixtures, pots, they are under the house, everywhere and they are waking up now.

Iris...hmmm.. usually mine bloom around 4/15...that is if they can get through the grass. I am rapidly losing iris every year. Between the water and the grass.. OY! Iam about to give up on them.
lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

March 4, 2010
4:33 PM

Post #7604790

I just came in the house from pulling weeds. I noticed I had a great deal of soft rot also. I guess with all the rain and moisture we've had that is to be expected. (frown) I'm thinking about using some Preen on the beds I've been working in.


BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

March 4, 2010
5:06 PM

Post #7604870

I tried Preen.. once...was not to crazy on it.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

March 4, 2010
6:32 PM

Post #7605111

I use preen in my regular beds and ronstar which is commercial grade preen in the iris fields and works great.

D
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

March 4, 2010
6:48 PM

Post #7605158

I have a high concentrate of grasses.. and weeds...I probably would be better off lifting all my iris and replanting them.. or better still just keep them in containers. I also flood so beardeds are a problem since the dont like all that water!

Now siberian iris, they do wonderful here as do the spurias.. I wish I had more of those. I would love to replace all those beardeds with them!

Here is one of my blue flags, they too do pretty good here.

Thumbnail by BLOSSOMBUDDY
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mattsmom
Tomah, WI

March 7, 2010
5:00 AM

Post #7610248

My problem is the neighbors creeping charlie. In the spring they have a "lovely" blue carpet covering their entire lawns. The nasty stuff creeps into all of my borders. I am constantly having to pull the stuff. Haven't found anything that works to kill it. The vine roots wherever a nodule touches. It is a nightmare!
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

March 7, 2010
6:28 AM

Post #7610382

Well yano, some peoples theory is is if its growing.. the heck with it...poor you!

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

March 7, 2010
6:38 AM

Post #7610406

Can you put a barrier along the side of your beds. It will probably creep underneath it, but it may be slowed down.
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

March 10, 2010
5:25 PM

Post #7619817

EARTHSPINNER, I have to tell y'all this - LOL.

Our iris club has been over to Dr. Epperson's garden two Mondays in a row weeding. We had a crew of five. we piled all the debris in the back of my pickup truck.

My DD is in the dog house. First Monday, she got assigned the chore of clearing out my truck. (take it to the compost pile, kid!) She dawdled and whined and growled. She finished at nearly 10pm - her dad rigged a trouble light for her to work by.

Next morning I went out at 6:30 to leave, and there was so much dirt still in the bottom of the truckbed that I got the manure shovel and scraped a layer out. Got a few shovels full of red clay...

...and 4 bedraggled irises, and one misplaced gardening glove one of the members lost that day.

Got a pretty darn good idea of who was weeding the fastest, and probably the least carefully...but I want them to come again, we need the help. So I didn't say anything.

The truck is full again, and I'm waiting for good weather to empty it...carefully.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

March 10, 2010
8:46 PM

Post #7620253

Roy would get a charge out of your troubles, as well as being grateful that the garden was weeded.
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

March 11, 2010
6:38 AM

Post #7620835

you can really tell he'd not been feeling up to doing it for a long time. I haven't felt up to my own for a long time either. This is actually inspiring me.

Now we're getting into the older beds, and oh my goodness, we're digging out so much bermuda grass it's no longer funny. Some of them are just grabbing the tops, or trimming back the grass, so I come behind them and dig a little deeper, reach in deep and pull, sometimes getting a grass root a couple feet long. good thing they are so visually different from iris root. it would be so very easy to dig an iris up by accident, I can't fault anyone.

Potted up those irises found in the truck bed, to take them back to replant. Susan Grigg said no, just keep 'em, she has enough NOIDs to deal with there (broken or lost tags).

But you know what? I'm going to pot them. See if I can match them to anything in those beds. IF I can get them to bloom this year. Then I'll give them back. Roy's daughters are so nice, and his grandkids are such a credit to him. It feels good just doing this. It's hard hard work, but it makes me feel all warm and cuddly inside. Don't know any other way to explain it.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

March 11, 2010
8:51 AM

Post #7621164

Good work, it is so difficult to fight grass & weeds as you get older & can't bend etc. I have a 'horri-horri' knife which was given to us withgarden tools as a Christmas present. Will see how that works on grass, but our weeds are not bermuda grass. Made our convention hotel reservations this morning.
lovelyiris
Winnsboro, TX

March 11, 2010
4:32 PM

Post #7622141

Well at least you started with a plan and some help pulling the weeds.

As for me I walked through the soggy beds and one thing lead to another. I bent over to pull a small section of grass that was growing too close to my daylilies. I was going to just do one little area, then it looked so good I couldn't stop. This bed is about 120 ft by 6ft. with nothing but daylilies staggared all through it. I ended up doing about 2/3 of it. I know what your talking about with the Bermuda Grass Bonjon. I'd pull one section and it would snake it's way through and around other plants. Some of it was like 3 or 4 ft long and looked wierd when I'd pull on it.

The grass killer I applied last fall worked pretty well. I'm going to say that over 80 to 85% of the grass was dead and I didn't have to work hard to get to the roots. I"m still trying to figure out where I can get someone to come help me pull my weeds out of all the other beds. One of my friends told me last year she didn't know how I did it that it would take 5 or 6 full time gardeners to keep up with everything around here. I just laughed and told her I only worried about what was fixing to bloom, what needed to be mowed, weedeatted and so forth.

I do have way too many plants to keep up with and take care of but it's not stopping me from ordering more. LOL I'm an addict and this is what I do for fun. Well, at least that's what I keep telling myself and that pulling weeds is good therapy and cheaper than a shrink.

Arrrrgggg, I still have so much to do to get everything in order for spring and bloom season. We had a terrible hail storm here yesterday and it actually beat the HAIL out of everything. My daffodils are in full bloom, I guess I should have said "were" in full bloom. (frown) now their beat down and lots of blooms completely beaten off. Some of my irises got a whollopin too. It looks like it snowed gumballs here too. The sweetgum trees still had tons of gumballs all over them. Now the ground, pation, deck and so forth are covered in them. Just one more of many things I need to clean up around here. Anyone want to come help me pull weeds and clean up sweetgum balls?
Betja
Bakersfield, CA

March 11, 2010
6:04 PM

Post #7622398

If you need someone to weed for you or do other yard work and don't know of anyone who could help you, and if you have a community college, state college or university in your area, you might contact their Placement Office to see if there is someone who could help you. I used to work at the State University here before I retired, and people could contact our Placement Office to arrange for students to do jobs for them such as yard work, moving, etc. There are usually student athletes who are looking to pick up work here and there, so if you don't know of anyone and are willing to pay, I'd think you could get a student to help you. Just an idea...
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

March 12, 2010
8:11 AM

Post #7623572

irisMA, DH reminded me today to make my conference reservations, since I haven't yet.

I forgot. someone's going to put that on my tombstone.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

March 12, 2010
11:16 AM

Post #7623926

Easy to do. Of course you realize that the price has gone up. forgetting is reasonable since you didn't think that you would be able to go.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2010
6:05 PM

Post #7755495

A Johnny Come Lately to this discussion. I have grass among my iris and Hi Yield (brand name?) OR Preen is safe for the Iris but kills the grass? thanx
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2010
6:16 PM

Post #7755530

Preen won't kill the grass, it only prevents seeds from germinating. It is safe for irises.

Hi Yield grass killer kills the growing grasses. And is supposed to be safe for the irises.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 1, 2010
6:43 PM

Post #7755625

Never had luck with Preen.
enidcandles
Enid, OK

May 1, 2010
10:57 PM

Post #7756143

I used Amaze this year - so far so good!! Other than the henbit that was already there, I have seen great results.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 2, 2010
6:14 AM

Post #7756477

Yes, Hi Yield is a brand name. They make lots of products. It would be nice to know which one everybody is talking about.
Weed control in Iris;
No chemicals. Cypress mulch does a very good job of weed control. Just add a little when it gets thin. Any weed that does come up pulls easily.
Bernie

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BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2010
7:53 AM

Post #7756704

What about on an old bed? I got grass, cant spray due to water table...pulling it is out of the question so I jhust have to grin and bare it in the bed.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2010
11:55 AM

Post #7757312

I'm betting someone suggests trying the lasanga bed idea for that. You layer stuff over the area you want for your bed. It's a pretty organic way to do it. Not sure how quickly you could plant iris but maybe someone has an idea.

Or maybe rent a sod cutter and cut and roll up the grass for give away or disposal.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2010
3:33 PM

Post #7757803

AD - GRASS...come get! >LOL
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2010
3:46 PM

Post #7757842

LOL
dd95172
Gilbertsville, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2010
7:35 PM

Post #7758640

I have used Hi-Yield grass killer on grass in iris and daylily beds. I spray over the top and have not had any problems with either the irises or daylilies.
Dennis
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2010
10:24 PM

Post #7758974

I have built lasagna beds and planted immediately. As long as the bed of layers is built deep enough it has worked for tomatoes, annuals, perrenials.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2010
4:21 AM

Post #7759227

Whats it say about spraying in wet areas?
MissIrisbert
Taylorsville, KY

May 3, 2010
11:00 AM

Post #7760406

I use Ornamec "over-the-top" grass killer, says on label safe for wetlands. It works great for me.

Sue

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 3, 2010
1:27 PM

Post #7760831

Does that kill grass that is already there ?
Doesn't hurt the Iris ?
SusanLouise
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

May 3, 2010
1:35 PM

Post #7760856

Hmmmmm...I just plucked the weeds out of our gardens...took 10 minutes. I may have a small Iris garden, but all of our other gardens are huge and I pluck the weeds all by hand. After one or 2 weeks of pulling them out root and all, for the rest of the Spring/Summer, no more weeds. We are careful to not use chemicals since we have a certified NWF backyard habitat for birds/critters, we use no chemicals and allow harmony for bugs and butterflies too. Last year we had nearly 40 varieties of butterflies grace our gardens :D

This message was edited May 3, 2010 4:18 PM
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2010
2:14 PM

Post #7760931

We do mainly organic due to the watertable and wetlands here.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 3, 2010
3:29 PM

Post #7761161

I checked out some of the things people are talking about here.
Hi Yield Grass Killer is "Poast", a very common farm chemical. Very much over priced by the company calling it Hi Yield grass killer. Be careful buying it, as they have another that has Round Up mixed in with the Poast. It will kill everything.

Ornamec is strictly for use on things you don't plan on eating. No veggies!
Very toxic to fish, so very careful if you have a pond.

Bernie
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2010
4:58 PM

Post #7761430

Bernie, those need a license to apply. Poast, Ornamec.. those are professional killers. Ornemec to my knowledge does not come in a applicable for backyarders. Unless they changed it, Correct me if I am wrong.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2010
5:28 PM

Post #7761542

Ornamec is sold at Amazon and other places in pint sizes.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2010
6:56 PM

Post #7761844

Um, size would be irrelivant.. its a chemical and if you need a license to apply it it should be on the lable. We used to do Ornamec until we dropped our applicators license and had to many issues with the wetlands here.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2010
7:05 PM

Post #7761869

The fact they are selling it on Amazon in pints, leads me to believe people without licenses purchase it. Normally conrtolled pesticides and weed killers are sold in commercial sizes. Amazon mentions nothing about needing a license. I have purchased it, although I have not used it yet, and there was nothing about needing a lcense. I do not have a license to apply chemicals, but do have a nursery. The place I purchsed it from, Griffin Greenhouses had no warning on it. So, in NY it does not need to be applied by someone with a license.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

May 3, 2010
7:29 PM

Post #7761937

Many chemicals Blossumbuddy are for commercial people with license...that is IF YOU ARE COMMERCIAL but if you, yourself is using it in almost ALL states it is legal as you are taking the liberal yourself.
On weeds as thick as you say and in wetlands, you can use hi yield yes a chemical but are you going to allow the weeds to kill the iris off in time, or weed it by hand, or start another bed, using a many ways.

If you love the planet as I do, but still want to have a nice garden, then you either weed by hand no matter how bad it has gotten, dig all up start a new bed, using preen or like product. I must use a product like preen for my acreage, and it is safe for the enviroment, the plants I want, the birds, bees and my animals.

NOTHING short of using a weed killer will get rid of the weeds, but there are many products now available on the market to stop the germination ratio of weeds, some special for just grasses other for such weeds as pearlwort and chickweed.

PREEN does work if you use it correctly but like all chemicals it is NOT a miricule cure it does take time...

D
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2010
7:44 PM

Post #7761986

Preen works well for me too.

That's very true Dee. many chemicals are approved for residential use, that commercial users have to have licenses for.

Didn't you say you had a nursery BLOSSOMBUDDY? Where is it located by the way, and what do you sell?

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 3, 2010
8:21 PM

Post #7762075

Only "Restricted" use chemicals need a licensed applicator. I don't know about Ornamec, but Poast is not restricted.

Most of the pollution from chemicals, weed killers, bug sprays, & fertilizers come from city dwellers. Farmers are much more conscious about what they use & how they use it. How many people actually read labels & then follow them.
Most likely they follow the advertising that shows the lush lawn. You can have this too, just dump my fertilizer on. So it goes on heavy, the next rain takes it down to the storm sewer & we all know where that goes.

Best is to hand weed & sleep better at night.

This bed will be hand weeded soon. Wasn't weeded last year, but those Dandelions are sneaky.
Bernie

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pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2010
8:47 PM

Post #7762156

Ornamec is not restriced in NY. In NY C1 applicator permits are required at time of purchase for any NY restricted chemical, and Ornamec is not one. Trimec Encore is the only restricted over the top product that I know of. This is NY now. I don't know the regs for other areas.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2010
6:17 AM

Post #7762750

Well, to an extent I will agree with you Bernie, but I have seen some sloppy farmers in our area with abusive overspray killing roaditches and boarder properties.

Ornamec is restricted in some states, but all chemiclas have an impact on watersheds so we got away from the chemicals long time ago, but I see people also abusing manure and so to me, it shows ignorance or stupidity or a combo of both when the abuse happens. And I know time is money and all that,. We farmed and we always tried ot play by the rules, but what I see is even the applicators from the spray companies doing foul.

I think its disgusting when a farmers politics sez, I make money so fine me, I will do what I want. Its that attitude and mentality that is killing our planet. They may or may not get fined because of the workers in patronage jobs that sit on their butts and do nothing either, but the chem spills and abuse go overlooked too.

But yeah, I will agree, the city gardeners are the worst when it comes to gardening. and use of chemicals, if you got a small garden, do it by hand. SO many are Kem-lawn addicts. Cant stand to have a dandelion. Well, hate ta tell these folks but some of the weeds they dont like, the bees need and then they wonder why we dont have bees.

Problem is is not enough people care, not enough people play by the rules. What irks me, is if I have to play by the rules so doues the dude nextdoor, but does he? Go figure.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

May 4, 2010
7:54 AM

Post #7763037

Blossum, I see you say you are Master Gardener..with expired papers. Here and to the best of my knowledge you must keep your papers up or they expire and you have to do it all over again. I know in the PNW that is the problem why I do not have mine, I can not keep up with the hours with being in business and being an active member of the iris society the garden club and the lily club.

Once along time ago I was going to do cut flowers for the florist here and when all of the three cities florist gave me list of what they expected for cut flowers, free from anything and everything and the money was about 20% of the selling price, I could not keep up enough without some use of either natural chemicals or big company chemicals.

Do I like chemicals, not really but the more you have in a business the more you realize you need help from them but follow the directions and read which is the least harmful to the enviroment and use it correctly. I do agree that many city gardeners do not read the label or if they do, they feel if a little is good then a lot is better WRONG..

Back in 92 I wanted a greenhouse like what you have and decided for 1200.00 instead of the selling price of 900 (in 92 for the one you have) that the difference was worth getting a 12 wide, 9 tall 20 foot long with door, window regular steel greenhouse. I have a groundcloth on the bottom that the water drains thro has lasted for all this time. NO MUD...sometimes when we get rain for month it does get wet now I have another one same price that is 14 x 10 x 25 and the plastic it is covered with has lasted in our weather for 10 years...

Now my friends are building a hoop house with changes as theirs are 12' wide by 10' tall by any length you want out of pvc...one has the clips (does not work for me with wind) and the other has the zipper with steel channels...door window has been spend 175.00 total...

D

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 4, 2010
10:18 AM

Post #7763360

D You will be allowed to laugh when it blows away.

All the stuff online about high tunnel gardening says not a word about wind. Did see pictures from Kansas where the universities high tunnel range was all blew apart, but they blamed it on a tornado.

This is one of mine last spring after 2 days & nights of 50MPH straight winds.

Thumbnail by CountryGardens
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Betja
Bakersfield, CA

May 4, 2010
10:47 AM

Post #7763439

Ouch! That would sure ruin your day.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2010
11:16 AM

Post #7763503

IRISLOVERDEE -

We quit our pest/herb applicators license years back. First,and foremost, was a pain like you say to keep up testing, take time from job to do it and all that.. We went organic (no chems) because the land we have now is a wetland. It is not wise nor practical to spray. Not gonna re-up that PAT. Not gonna happen for this ground.
And dont use herbicides or pesticides in the GH's. Fertilizers are a seperate matter. And now we are arganic because of the livestock. Fertilizing this particular kind of land with commercial fert is a waste of time and money. It does not hold since this land in particular would take a lot of humous to make it worth anything.

As for organic manures on wetlands, yes, there is issues with that but you have to know what your doing and go more by more rules to be in the best management of the land. A lot of stooopid people think they can spread poo just anywhere and that is soooo wrong. And wetlands are tricky. Some kinds are spreadable, others arent.
Now I guess the blame Govt wants a poo spreaders test and PAT...ya cant poo with out a license just about.

Have not been selling plants for a while. Licensing to sell though is easy.. one call to the DOA., they inspect your perennials, you pay your dues and you then contact the state and get your retailers ID if you are retail to get your tax certificate. Last I knew, no license or inspection was required for annual production. Smart to also register your business in the county. Right now, we are not functioning as a business. Business has been so bad economically for the last decade it aint worth the paperwork doing in my area since the economy sucks. We put the business on hold and also due to illness in family so its hard to do all. The accountant said years back, get out. Function for tax writeoffs were winding down too. Making things wore for making any profit.

We have a small fiberglass what I call a GPS (glorified potting shed).. greenhouse - 16 long and 8x8 wide and high... also have a 100 foot by 25 hoophouse that we have yet in 10 years got the plastic on. and have a smaller on about 25 long 25 wide. Economically, cant afford the LP to heat one of any size if it had plastic. Does my GPS pay for itself, yes, many times over as long as I do not heat it.

I am a retired certified florist, have papers in hort, retired farmer used to farm 120 acres, but now back to hobby ranching and grow my gardens for pleasure so if that makes me a "master gardener" thats what someone else calls me. We do know lots about the abuse and use of chemicals on a large scale as well as small. I feel a few "good old boys" can give farming a black eye when it comes to the abuse. Not all farmers are bad, but some are extreme and they get away with stuff you and I could not. Well, I could not anyway because of my conscience

the city gardeners can be the worst in chem use due to the small yards and a lot of chems are uncalled for. You can control weeds in the lawn by mowing. But most opt for lawncare. Too lazy or age issues to pluck by hand and many are just not savy to the environmental impact they do when they chem it.

The worst abuse in the city lawns is fertilizing. Most do it to excess and either burn their lawn or it washes to the sewers. Same with the weed killers... Sewer water gets reprocessed... then you have problems with chems in the water that are not easily removed. YEP, its in the water and cant come out. Course the road traffic in the city has ha, nothing to do with any pollution there either now does it.. haha..yes it does, but they forget that. They forget the high concentration of folks on small bits of land and then because everyone is doing it, its ok.. NOT.

They chem it and have to mow it double time since its growing more due to them fertilizing it. Mulch mowing will dang near do the same thing.. mow less too and stillbe GREEN. Saves fuel, saves chemical abuse and still makes for nice. But a lot of city folks are brainwashed into chemicals. Me personally, I like dandelions. I like the bees too that come with them. We need them.

Most farmers that I know farming small farms under 1000 acres virtually cannot afford to put enough chemicals and fertilizer on the ground to grow a perfect weed free well fertilized crop annually. Then on a bad year...it gets worse. There is not much profit in much farming. Its a lot of expense. Anyone farming less that a grand in acreage probably has antique equipment or they borrow/share with a neighbor whose bigger and still cant profit.

Did we use chemicals when we farmed yes we did. You cant avoid it. But did the chemical companies follow the PAT to the letter... hell no. They cant avoid it either. They spray when windy and make their runs to get as much acreage sprayed for their money. Did we see clients burned. Hell yes. We got burned. Poor application ruined many a crop by the pros too by either too many weeds, overspray or weak chemical
application wasted due to wind or watered down. Its a deal if you want it done right you have to do it all yourself. And you cannot afford to do that either the way the government got their claws in all the pockets. And if you dont have excess money, you cant do it all right because you have to have some to spare to bail yourself out.

Farming today aint like it was years back.

And I tell ya what, composting on a large scale is the biggest joke of the century. Those big compost farms are nothing but large glorified garbage dumps and probably got more chemicals in them then you can shake a stick on since some of those blam places take yardwaste from the city and the city waste is a devils brew. I know, because I also used to farm nextdoor to a dump of one and so what can I say. Land pollution if I ever saw it and it was not done right. It couldnt be. Too much dang blame politics in it.

When folks like that take in city waste to the country, its nothing but a glorified garbage dump. Its not GREEN and not good for the environment. There is not enough control to make it so especially when the fuel is greed. YUP G_R_E_E_D

Im sorry, but that is the way of some of the large heap farms. And its a dirty shame they ruin it for the smaller farms. I would love to say something encouraging about being a farmer, but unless you got a hell of a lot of money to spend you shure the hell will not make any. You have to have it first to spend it. One lousy year can take you down a full seven if not more and you will be eating crows if you are not aware.

Well, I guess we best get back to yaking about IRIS... that was what this thread was about and I humbly apologize for ranting on the PAT and other issues, but thats the truth from our end. Been around too many years to candy coat the truth and just get plain royally fed up with the politics.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

May 4, 2010
11:48 AM

Post #7763575

His and other friend have with stood 50+ MPH winds. As they start out this way and do a lot of modifying on them...plus they use the steel channels with the zipper links

D
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2010
12:32 PM

Post #7763702

Yeah, we have to put the end walls on them yet too. Occasisonally we will just take a tarp over for shad e on the perennials.

I wanted to get the 25 footer plasticed first. Where its at the wind would have to be reallllly bad to take it. On the 100 footor, its more out in the open, but has a tree line that protects it from the west. What I need is a mountain of gravel so I can use it too. needs a good floor. Rightnow its grass so I just mow it! LOL!

The GPS, I just put wood chips in it and clean it out periodically. Neve had trouble with bugs in it.

I think my iris are starting to bloom. Saw some in town so must go see my grassy eye-rye bed! LOL!
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2010
11:08 AM

Post #7790039

I have a bag of corn gluten and will sprinkle among my iris & other perennials to prevent new grass. I forgot I had this in the dark corner of my garage.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 13, 2010
3:21 PM

Post #7790673

Corn glutten? S'plain yerself Lucy!?

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

May 13, 2010
4:22 PM

Post #7790791

I have never used corn glutten for preventing weed seed germination, but I am tempted to do so. I have been told that it helps & is not chemical.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 14, 2010
4:45 AM

Post #7791772

SO ok, how too?????
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2010
7:58 AM

Post #7792206

http://www.extension.umn.edu/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/h531cornglutenmeal.html

The above is a link explaining corn gluten and below is a link discussing it in the iris beds.

eveysblissfulgarden.com/Iris/PlantingInstructions.htm

I 1st heard about it 5 yrs ago as research coming out of Oregon State Univ. but I think lots of state Universities are involved in this research. There is a patent now on it for one of its uses. I p/u @ local feed store where I get my alfalfa pellets for the garden. It is day-glow yellow (corn). There is a ton of info on-line re: corn gluten for the lawn/garden.
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

May 15, 2010
5:48 AM

Post #7794333

will have to give it some thought! Thanx
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

May 15, 2010
6:25 AM

Post #7794403

For the commercial beds did not do much but you are talking 3 acres!

I use Ronstar and another product can not think of name...only thing that it does not seem to work on is pearlwort and chickweed...but vinegar water is killing the pearlwort and starting to kill the chickweed and you can spray it on top of the iris without a problem, just can not do it often or will change the PH in the soil.

D
estrail1rider
Melfa, VA
(Zone 8a)

May 15, 2010
6:42 AM

Post #7794425

Right now my irises are in beds just around the house but I want to make a "real" bed next to the space for our veggie garden. I know of some ways to stop weeds/grasses from growing between the rows but wondered what the rest of you used? In some places I have the landscape cloth and it does well except for the infernal wild onions. Yep, would take a sledgehammer to them if I thought it would work.
JOHNSON GRASS!!! Of what a pain. The roots are HUGE and DEEP!
DH idea of a new bed is just tilling. Breaks the roots up and then I have a gazzilion more! We have tried just about everyhing on it. Round-up kills everything down to bare ground with a great amt. used and then the Johnson grass just pops right back up.
Anyway...what to use in the walkways between the rows?
deb
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 15, 2010
7:15 AM

Post #7794520

Deb

I'm using the heavy fabric, polypropylene. It lasted great through the winter, and the only weeds are some that came up through the clips.
And then I'm mulching around the beardless and around, but away from, the bearded with straw. It's working fantastic.

Here's the fabric I'm using. Well worth the cost.

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/Weed-Barrier-20-year/productinfo/GR-WB20/

The best price I got was at AM Leonard. Shipping was very reasonable. It's an investment, but well worth it.
estrail1rider
Melfa, VA
(Zone 8a)

May 16, 2010
6:42 AM

Post #7796964

Thanks! I took a look at that and hubby said we could do that with not much trouble. I try to do as much as I can when I am able...he is working so hard putting in pasture fences...I hate telling him I need something else. Matbe this fall. Haven't done anything to that bed yet so is ok for now. No irises in there yet.
estrail1rider
Melfa, VA
(Zone 8a)

May 16, 2010
6:45 AM

Post #7796970

Hmmmm...maybe I should spray weed killer over the area this summer before I start planting! DH says water table is down far enough and it is over our septic field where we can't plant much or graze anything there.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 16, 2010
6:54 AM

Post #7796993

How about putting a tarp over the area until you want to use it? That will kill anything.
bonjon
Raleigh, NC

June 12, 2010
3:11 PM

Post #7882544

well, either I'm doing something wrong, or my pre-emergant that cost and arm and a leg didn't work. my gardens are just as weedy now as before I weeded.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

June 12, 2010
3:49 PM

Post #7882626

I sprayed my beds with Poast. It took a while but grass is dying off. Even quack grass.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

June 12, 2010
6:39 PM

Post #7883080

DH read the Preen label, didn't like it so took it back. We have a weed which is easy to pull, but shoots its seed around. So I pop it in a second bucket so it won't go into the compost. Grass is harder to pull & its pollen is out at the moment.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

February 19, 2011
9:20 AM

Post #8380563

The other day I pulled out all the grass among my barely emerging iris. Maybe some corn gluten later?

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

February 19, 2011
11:23 AM

Post #8380762

Not yet weeding here as we still can't see the ground.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

February 19, 2011
4:30 PM

Post #8381298

As we are now in a new season, I thought a new thread would be in order.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1159594/
See you there!
Bernie
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

February 20, 2011
2:12 PM

Post #8382866

Thanks Bernie.. see you guys there!

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