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Tropical Fruits: Guava

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Forum: Tropical FruitsReplies: 22, Views: 382
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SobeGardener
Miami Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

August 13, 2009
11:00 PM

Post #6943653

June 23 2008 the tree is about 3 years old a friend keep it in a pot and them gave it to me, I plant it in the ground right of way .Huge mistake from a new gardener ,the guava was in full fruit season…


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SobeGardener
Miami Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

August 13, 2009
11:03 PM

Post #6943661

Pink Guava

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SobeGardener
Miami Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

August 13, 2009
11:04 PM

Post #6943667

Dec 18 2008 I think the change almost kill it. ….I keep having hope . Giving all my love and daily attention.


This message was edited Aug 19, 2009 1:24 AM

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SobeGardener
Miami Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

August 13, 2009
11:06 PM

Post #6943672

Today August 12 - 13 2009 The tree is in his prime time sweet ,pink beautiful baseball size guava.and blooming every day . I am a happy camper. Thank you Mother Earth ..!!!

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SobeGardener
Miami Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

August 13, 2009
11:07 PM

Post #6943680

Pink Guava Miami Beach,Fl

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Jungleman
Pasadena, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 18, 2009
3:39 AM

Post #6959419

Wow, those are really nice size! Miami has an ideal climate for Guava, I think.
x4gardening
Hesperia, CA

August 19, 2009
3:17 AM

Post #6963219

You were'nt kidding. Which one is the baseball? :)
Very Nice...
SobeGardener
Miami Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

August 19, 2009
5:46 AM

Post #6963567

New update

Softball size Guava… pest free.. oh boy I ‘m heaven …
Keep on growing!..by the way also fert free.
Pure city water and ocean Breeze...

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x4gardening
Hesperia, CA

August 23, 2009
2:34 AM

Post #6977780

Do you know what kind of Guava you have growing? By name so I can check the nurseries when I go.
SobeGardener
Miami Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

August 23, 2009
2:46 PM

Post #6979033

Here is a little info/history of the florida Guava cultivar ..My is Ruby!

One of the most gregarious of fruit trees, the guava, Psidium guajava L., of the myrtle family (Myrtaceae), is almost universally known by its common English name or its equivalent in other languages. In Spanish, the tree is guayabo, or guayavo, the fruit guayaba or guyava. The French call it goyave or goyavier; the Dutch, guyaba, goeajaaba; the Surinamese, guave or goejaba; and the Portuguese, goiaba or goaibeira. Hawaiians call it guava or kuawa. In Guam it is abas. In Malaya, it is generally known either as guava or jambu batu, but has also numerous dialectal names as it does in India, tropical Africa and the Philippines where the corruption, bayabas, is often applied. Various tribal names–pichi, posh, enandi, etc.–are employed among the Indians of Mexico and Central and South America.
Cultivars


Formerly, round and pear-shaped guavas were considered separate species–P. pomiferum L. and P. pyriferum L.–but they are now recognized as mere variations. Small, sour guavas predominate in the wild and are valued for processing.


'Redland', the first named cultivar in Florida, was developed at the University of Florida Agricultural Research and Education Center, Homestead, and described in 1941. Very large, with little odor, white-fleshed and with relatively few seeds, it was at first considered promising but because of its excessively mild flavor, low ascorbic acid content, and susceptibility to algal spotting, it was abandoned in favor of better selections.


'Supreme' came next, of faint odor, thick, white flesh, relatively few, small seeds, high ascorbic acid content and ability to produce heavy crops over a period of 8 months from late fall to early spring.


'Red Indian', of strong odor, medium to large size, round but slightly flattened at the base and apex, yellow skin often with pink blush; with medium thick, red flesh of sweet flavor; numerous but small seeds; agreeable for eating fresh; fairly productive in fall and early winter.


'Ruby', with pungent odor, medium to large size; ovate; with thick, red flesh, sweet flavor, relatively few seeds. An excellent guava for eating fresh and for canning; fairly productive, mainly in fall and early winter.


'Blitch' (a seedling which originated in West Palm Beach and was planted at Homestead)–of strong odor, medium size, oval, with light-pink flesh, numerous, small seeds; tart, pleasant flavor; good for jelly.


'Patillo' (a seedling selection at DeLand propagated by a root sucker and from that by air-layer and planted at Homestead)–of very mild odor, medium size, ovate to obovate, with pink flesh, moderate number of small seeds; subacid, agreeable flavor; good for general cooking. (As grown in Hawaii it is highly acid and best used for processing).


'Miami Red' and 'Miami White', large, nearly odorless and thick-fleshed, were released by the University of Miami's Experimental Farm in 1954.

This message was edited Aug 23, 2009 10:47 AM
x4gardening
Hesperia, CA

August 23, 2009
6:49 PM

Post #6979867

Thanks...
Ruby...is what I want then...
lakesidecallas
Dandridge, TN
(Zone 6a)

August 31, 2009
12:09 AM

Post #7006147

A beautiful plant!
Did you move it from the original spot you planted it?
SobeGardener
Miami Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

October 27, 2009
4:44 AM

Post #7212626

Yes, Summer of 2008 the tree is about 3 years old a friend keep it in a pot and them gave it to me, I plant it in the ground right of way .
The tree was grow from a cuttings in the are of The Redland, here in Dade county Florida.
So ,It my be around 5 -6 years old.
jujubetexas
San Marcos, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 27, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #7214193

I bought my Ruby Supreme 10-30 this spring. I think 10-30 is a disease resistant variety.
It was pretty small but produced 2 flowers and gave one fruit.
After I picked the fruit, it produced 4 flowers and gave two fruit.
After I picked those, it produced 4 flowers and gave 4 fruit which are still growing.

Three fruiting seasons in 7-8 months.

It is in a 15 gallon pot and is a dark horse in the running for favorite potted plant.
carolyn_haack
Saint Petersburg, FL

October 28, 2009
12:23 AM

Post #7215153

I grew my guava from some seeds friends gave me as a gift. It's 2 1/2 now, and it fruited for the first time this summer.

I enjoy the taste of guava, but I really LOVE the smell of the ripe fruit.

I don't know why more people in the southern states don't grow them. They're reasonably care free.
jujubetexas
San Marcos, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 28, 2009
4:00 AM

Post #7215782

Most Guavas are only hardy to around 26 degrees at best. There is the Strawberry Guava that is hardy down to 22 degrees but it is a very small fruit. Florida and South Texas are really the only place they can be put in the ground.
carolyn_haack
Saint Petersburg, FL

October 28, 2009
11:17 AM

Post #7216164

True, but even in Florida it's not commonly grown.

You drive everywhere here, and people plant Citrus, Bananas, Papaya, and Mangos, followed by Loquats, Avocados, and Dragon Fruit.

Rarely Guava though. In fact, I see Sugar Apples and Coconut Palms planted more commonly here.


ApopkaJohn
Apopka, FL
(Zone 10a)

September 1, 2010
5:40 PM

Post #8075352

Yes we have guava bushes in Central Florida. Fruit requires cross pollination by another variety. This maybe your strawberry guava or pineapple guava.

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ApopkaJohn
Apopka, FL
(Zone 10a)

September 1, 2010
5:43 PM

Post #8075357

Guava bush survived 22 degrees this past winter.

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jujubetexas
San Marcos, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 1, 2010
6:22 PM

Post #8075431

That is Strawberry Guava if I had to guess. Pineapple Guava isnt even a real Guava and stays green. They are hardy down to 10 degrees or more. Mine took 11F this winter.
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

October 17, 2010
11:28 AM

Post #8160713

I would absolutely LOVE to get some pineapple guava seeds! I have cattley (strawberry) guava and golden florida guava. I am also looking for lemon guava.
I can trade or pay costs. Please somebody?

This message was edited Oct 17, 2010 1:30 PM
jujubetexas
San Marcos, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 17, 2010
6:14 PM

Post #8161323

Good news. Pineapple Guava comes into season in the next few weeks. I suspect they will be in some of the grocery stores that carry exotic fruit like Whole Foods. Frankly, it would be easier to just buy one at a local nursery. You can get a 3 foot bush for 20 bucks. Remember that Pineapple Guava requires 50-200 hours of chill to produce fruit unlike real guavas.
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

October 19, 2010
8:21 AM

Post #8164165

jujube- I didn't know that chill thing about the pineapple guava. We do get a longer chill here in the 'Glades than most of S. FL but can't count on it. Thanks for the Whole Foods tip. I will be going to town soon and will look.

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