How to propogate perennial dianthus?

Albany, ME(Zone 4b)

I find that my dianthus desmond and dianthus inchmery produce almost no seeds. Is there another way to propogate them? What do the professionals do?

TIA
LAS

Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

Layering has proven the easiest and surest way of propagating Dianthus. You can also root them in water, which will need to be changed DAILY.

Albany, ME(Zone 4b)

What do you put in the water? A growing tip with those pseudo roots at the bottom? How long? Take off the leaves at the bottom? Use rootone? It seems much more obvious for dianthus inchmery, which spreads and looks like it wants to layer. But my dianthus desmond have so far stayed in clumps with no obvious pieces to layer or put in water.

I didn't mention dianthus fenbow, because it looks like it might produce lots of seeds (seed pods still green), but if it doesn't, how would one do that? Just clumps with very tall leafy flower stems.

tia
las

This message was edited Aug 28, 2009 6:32 PM

Winchester, KY(Zone 6a)

Las, Dianthus cuttings typically root easily as tip cuttings (they root at the leaf nodes), but I've found them very easy to just pull out pieces with those pseudo roots you mentioned, and just replant them. They take right off and start growing. I usually take several and plant them as one little clump for a fuller look faster.

Bensenville, IL(Zone 5a)

If I take pseudo pieces now would they root in zone 5a or should I hold off until spring?

Winchester, KY(Zone 6a)

I've only done it in spring, so not really sure. They're very tough, so it would be worth a try.

Tulsa, OK(Zone 6b)

The pro's do both tip cuttings and tissue culture. I agree with gemini...it would be worth trying. I am a fan of try everything and see what you get. I know I am having some difficulty with dianthus seeds but I am sure they will start once we get cooler temps. I amthinking they prefer cool weather to propagate and germinate. Just my opinion
Dave

Winchester, KY(Zone 6a)

Dave, I believe you're right about the cool temps- wintersowing has always worked well for me with Dianthus.

Tulsa, OK(Zone 6b)

It just sounded logical to me

Nutley, NJ(Zone 6b)

gemini_sage,

Would you please provide more details about you’re rooting method and do you have any photographs of those pseudo roots you mentioned? Which Dianthus species do you perpetrate?

Mike

Winchester, KY(Zone 6a)

Mike, I've mostly used the method I described with Dianthus gratianopolitanus, 'Bath's Pink' and 'Firewitch', and a few times with another species I haven't identified that has a growth habit and appearance similar to Sweet William (Dianthus barbatus), except it is perennial.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/73553/

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54644/

I don't have any pics of the process, but it's really easy, and they're such tough, forgiving plants I don't think you'll have any problems. Established clumps tend to form a mat that increases in size. If you yank a growth tip from the edge of the mat, its likely to pull away from the clump easily, as the leafless part of the stem that lies close to the soil line is wiry and somewhat brittle. That wiry, leafless part of the stem is where I sometimes see dark colored roots, just kinda hanging there and not rooted into the soil, and that's the part I plant as though it was completely rooted.

Good luck! Hope that helps :-)

Tulsa, OK(Zone 6b)

Gemini:
i apreciate the insite. I've thought about gently removing some of the outer mat with roots and poping them into cells. I guess the question is and it will have to be an experiment unless someone has done it. How well will the harvested sections do? would mis help them to take hold and improve there survival?
Just some thoughts
Dave

Albany, ME(Zone 4b)

Pughbear, I have had good luck with pinning those leafless stems an inch or so under the soil. By the next season they have developed a good root system and can be moved as separate plants.

LAS

Tulsa, OK(Zone 6b)

Thank you for the info.
Dave

Nutley, NJ(Zone 6b)

At the end of last spring 2010, I purchased a pot of mixed colors Carnations at a closeout sale. Of interest were two white Carnations, one with a single row of petals and the other with a double row of petals. The different colors were separated and the two white Carnations put into separate pots and the unwanted colors planted into my garden. None of the Carnations had any seed pods so I know I was dealing with the Carnation pollen sterility gene which I have discussed previously.

All through the summer the stalks were too stiff to attempt layering without breaking them. By the end of August the old growth was dying-off and the new growth was soft and flexible. I fashioned 2.5” long by 0.5” wide staples from old lightweight hangers, of the type one obtains from the cleaners, and used the staples to pin the new growth into depressions in the soil of the pot which was then backfilled. When the original Carnation stopped producing new grown I covered each pot with an additional inch of soil. Attached is a picture of one of the pots with two unused staples displayed for size comparison. The new satellite Carnations are doing well and will be protected during the coming winter. The second pot was so full of new Carnations that it was difficult to see the individual plants.

One unnamed Dianthus which may have been in my family for 70 years produced soft stems throughout the growing season and the propagation rate was unbelievable. I will post pictures when I get a chance.

Mike


This message was edited Nov 18, 2010 7:12 AM

Thumbnail by Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ(Zone 6b)

The two pots of white Carnations which I discussed last year flowered and I had a bit of a surprise. In the attached photograph the pot on the right is loaded with 12” single-flower white Carnations as I expected. The pot on the left contains 12” double-flower white Carnations and 18” single-flower white Carnations towards the back. As the 12” single-flower Carnations need more room, I will move them to a larger pot and again divide the pot on the left into two pots. The lesson to be learned is that when you start separating a mixed lot of Carnations or any Dianthus species, make sure that you only have one plant with each division.

All three Carnation forms are pollen fertile which is what I was really after. By next spring, if all goes well, I will have:
• 12” double-flower white carnation.
• 12” single-flower white carnation.
• 18” single flower white carnation.

Mike

Thumbnail by Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ(Zone 6b)

While looking for Dianthus seed sources in the UK, I came across this fantastic video on Dianthus propagation from cuttings. I have been reading about how to do this but there is nothing like a hands on video. Not only are your shown what to do, you are shown what not do and why.

Whetman Pinks – Propagation
http://www.whetmanpinks.com/propagation.html

And no, they don’t ship to the United States either!

Mike

Albany, ME(Zone 4b)

Oh, wow, Mike. This is the best! How was it that you happened to read this post which was last active a year ago??

I was interested to see that that wonderful site did not have any dianthus Desmond or Inchmery. There must be so many dianthus!!!

Thanks,
LAS

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