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NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

August 30, 2009
5:51 AM

Post #7003723

I do not like certain weeds either, for as the saying goes "one years seeds, is seven years weeds!"
When I go up to my cottage in Oxfordshire (built in 1412), although there was an original one mentioned in the Domesday book of 1086, there are always lots of the things everywhere, that need attending to.
As a Horticulturist. it is relatively easy for me to tell what I do and do not want, then it is set to and dig them out.
However I must admit my greatest pleasure is when the local farmer does my field which he rents.
For he does not a have a smelly, noisy tractor; he has Shire Horses and still ploughs that way with them.
I go to help out; the look of these wonderful huge animals simply pulling a heavy plough is awesome, you cannot rush them, they go at their own speed. They can however go all day at that speed, and do not give up, or run out of Diesel!
To get a perfect straight line, is a wonderful sight, as the Horses pull the plough, and it slices through the weeds.
Then you stop for lunch; water and feed the Horses, then have a ploughmans lunch, which is basically crusty bread (like french bread), cheese or ham, pickles and a bit of salad, which is normally available in the fields, and of course a pint of English beer!
Then to see the finished product of a field ploughed in straight lines by hand, is inspiring, no weeds, all gone!
Then to put the Horses away and into the farmers house, where his good lady, has a nice hot steak and kidney pudding waiting to be eaten!
That is weeding in heaven!
On the walk back I dip my fly fishing rod into the farmers mill pond, if I get a couple of trout for breakfast, that is a bonus as well.
As for panty hose in the glove box, i think my wife might be asking a few questions!
Regards from England.
Neil.

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 30, 2009
3:18 PM

Post #7004517

I once talked to an elderly gentleman in Eng. who said that he was a ploughboy in his youth. People knew who had ploughed which furrow & on Sat. afternoons would go out & discuss the furrows & which were the straight ones. Talk about 'quality control'. Don't know if they used shire horses however.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

August 30, 2009
6:46 PM

Post #7005236

Shire Horses were mostly used as they are about 19-21 hands tall, and immensely powerful. They are the gentle giants of the Horse world, and I love them!
Yes even now with tractors, people discuss the tractors, and then we meet down the pub on a Saturday to talk about the ploughing, it still goes on.
In the Victorian era, the really big estates used Horses to mow the lawns. They were fitted with slippers so they did not mark the lawns; the perfect stripes in a straight line could be got with them, that is 'quality control.'
Now they still have ploughing competitions at the county shows, with Horses, Traction engines and tractors.
Although you do need two Traction engines and a lot of skill to plough a field.
There is still a much loved pickle over here called Ploughmans pickle!
Keep up the weeding.
Regards.
Neil.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 30, 2009
6:51 PM

Post #7005253

There are pulling contests with horses at the Topsfield Fair near here in Oct. I have only seen the 'lightweight' pulls so no Shires. Tractor pulls in many places. I think the horses are there just for competions, never seen any working in fields.
Pamgarden
Central, VA
(Zone 7b)

August 30, 2009
9:35 PM

Post #7005746

I really enjoyed this article, and then when I came to this thread, I enjoyed Neil's story.

Petalpants
Corpus Christi, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 31, 2009
4:59 PM

Post #7008872

Neil, I didn't know they still used those horses to work fields! I guess that's the same breed of horses that are called the 'Budweiser horses'?? I've seen them here in person, and they are Huge, and beautiful! We had horses for about 10 years, some Quarter-horses and Appaloosas; I really miss them! I can see a bale of hay on t.v. or somewhere, & it makes me shiver! Thanks for the story, Neil. =)

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 31, 2009
9:30 PM

Post #7009663

'Budweiser horses' are Clydesdales.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

August 31, 2009
11:17 PM

Post #7010059

As I have never seen a 'Budweiser horse', and I do not know what Budweiser is, I would not know!
Clydesdales are used extensively, for the same job. They too are beautiful, and I love them also.
However you see more of them up North and more shires in the South.
They in competitions are called 'Heavy Horses', for of course their size, weight and power.
This thread seems to have gone from weeding to ploughing, although ploughing is weeding, in a way!
I did get a D-mail about this thread, so well done irisMA, as it seemed to have stirred a few memories.
In London there is still a brewery not far from us, which is handy to say the least. For in your money it is $10.00 for the day visit, $5.00 for children.
For a day you get to be shown how beer is made, then how they make the wooden barrels by hand (coopers), the highlight of the visit for us, is to go to the stables. Then you get to sample the beer (not children, they get dandelion and burdock). They still use shire horses to deliver all their beer in London, all pulled by carts the apprentices have to make! It is quite a wonderful sight to see. They are cheaper than lorries, go the same speed in the City of London as the cars! Also as they have always done it for hundreds of years, it is good publicity. Car drivers are not as silly to muck with a shire horse, unless you want one or two of them annoyed with your car.
When I have to go up to the City, I always buy some peppermints, as you will normally bump into the horses somewhere.
I always ask first, then if allowed I give the horses, some peppermints. For some reason most horses like sweet peppermints.
I have been asked this question about Horse brasses, yes most English pubs in the Country have horse brasses on the walls.
Some are decorative, but a lot are not. They were won in competitions. Proudly cleaned and shown on polished leather.
Kind Regards from England.
These are Clydesdales Petalpants.





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Petalpants
Corpus Christi, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 1, 2009
3:28 PM

Post #7012812

Iris & Neil: I remember now; don't know how I got the breeds mixed-up, guess because they are both huge and pull wagons or whatever. Neil, I guess Iris told you that the Budweiser horse team pulls a beer wagon; they attend alot of fairs everywhere, not only because people like to see the horses, but it's good advertising for them! That's pretty neat that the brewery there still delivers their beer by horse & cart, and in the streets; you won't find that around here! What is a 'lorrie', Neil, like a truck or van? It'd be fun to visit that brewery and see how they make beer & all, although I don't drink beer; I don't even like to smell it, Ha! :+(
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 1, 2009
7:04 PM

Post #7013626

Dear Petalpants, no nobody has told me what Budweiser was, so upon going over my local pub, I asked the Landlord.
He told me it was an American beer that we get over here in bottles or cans, and it served Ice cold, how strange!
So whilst talking to a friend of mine as we have only "Real Ale' in our pub, he said he had tried the stuff at his brothers wedding.
He says if it is served Ice cold, it has little or no taste and is like a lager, oh dear! He also claims if it is allowed to go warm as beer should be served, it tastes and smells like something your cat has done in the garden.
Before people start writing I do not know, I was only told this as i wanted to know what this American beer was.
I stick to best bitter in the summer and Guinness in the winter, plus I do not drink what they call session Ales.
These are very strong bitters, that some people drink if they are in the pub for a drinking session.
Connie a Lorry is a truck, there are of course lots of different sizes. The really big 40 ton Artics as we call them, would not be able to go in the narrow little streets in the City of London.
The City of London is only one mile square, and is full off little lanes and alley ways, it was meant for Horse and carts, so they are ideal.
The brewery is a great day out, as they do not only make beer, they make country wines as well.
So you get to see that, and if you do not like beer, you can taste the extensive rang of wines they make.
The horses are of course quite lovely, and I love to be near them, wonderful animals and still used.
Regards to all from London.
Neil.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 1, 2009
8:21 PM

Post #7013918

I think ice cold of any drink including (if you pardon the expression, water) came about because of the heat of the midwestern & southern climates. Ice was shipped to India in the 19th century for the smae reason. I don't drink beer of any sort, first by choice & now because of a medication which doesn't allow me to drink alcohol of any sort. The Clydesdales were such a such as advertising that a Milwaukee, WI brewery now uses Belgians, but those are not as famous.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 2, 2009
12:16 AM

Post #7014917

Dear Iris, I do hope I have not upset anyone, especially you.
My father is diabetic and my mother has had a triple heart by pass, the medication they are both on stops them from drinking any form of alcohol. So they love Ice cold mineral water, which I also enjoy on the odd hot day over here.
I also admit to loving cold ginger beer, which is not alcoholic, just warm and soothing, and you can get ones with no sugar in it.
When I worked on a Victorian estate they had an ice house, although it was not used, apart from me as I was the head gardener.
This thing sunk into the ground, it may seem somewhat ancient, but that is what they used to store the Ice, brought down from London.
It made the perfect store for apples and other associated fruits, so I took full use of it.
As for beer the English in India, required a beer that would last the sea trip, to India.
So breweries made IPA, or Indian pale ale , which they still do, how they make it I do not know!
This beer when put in a cask or wooden barrel, lasted the sea trip, and the soldiers drunk it.
Tonic water was also made, as quinine, was at the time an anti malaria drug, and tonic water contained it.
Then as you say, the shipped ice was served for the officers with Gin, Ice , lemon and tonic.
Hence your Gin and tonic drink, most used by officers!
Personally, I find any horses quite beautiful, wether they be Hunters, point to point, about the same.
My Grandfather was a jockey, before the first World War. Unfortunately he was not allowed to go in the Army in in 1914 as he was too short. When conscription came in he went in the Service corps. He dragged ammunition and food for the soldiers, in the trenches, on mules.
He was a fine horseman, and taught m a lot of things.
For that i am eternally grateful.
Regards from England.
Neil.


irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 2, 2009
1:14 AM

Post #7015184

I never liked the taste of beer, but wine every now & then. Abit socially embarrasing not to drink it, but really doesn't matter. I am quite fond of ginger beer & we can't get the real stuff here & had troubles doing so in London. 'We have ginger ale,' they would say. No bite to it at all. It was a joke on a gardening trip to England & I was given a can as a present.m glad to have it in my hotel room, as our group was coming back on the train from Hampton Court Palace & could not go out to eat as it was the day of the terrorist attack in London, the cab driver didn't want to go near the hotel which was near the area of attack & we could not go out to eat. Solved the cab trip home with help of an english nurse & I dined on bisquits & ginger beer in my room. Thank heavens for the can of ginger beer. I love horses, early influence of 'Black Beauty'. We have come a long way from weeds, haven't we.
Petalpants
Corpus Christi, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 2, 2009
1:50 AM

Post #7015378

Don't like beer, not that fond of wine, maybe champagne once or twice a year for celebrations; don't think ginger-ale is tasty either (unless that's all you have to drink, Iris!); I don't drink coffee (not even Starbuck's!); but I have to have my cold Coke (Coca Cola) in the morning, and 1 or 2 in the day; plus I like Iced-Tea (no sugar), esp. at mealtimes; and Lemonade (preferably Pink! Ha!); and also keep a cold bottle of good Water with me most of the time. I'm just not a 'social drinker', but I can have as good a time as everyone else at a party or get-together; I just drink a coke or Sprite instead! I don't care if other people are drinking or not; it doesn't bother me, well, as long as they don't get drunk--- that's a turn-off to me. Now, as for the horses, I Love Horses...I had several for 10 years, and miss everything about them! I get near horses every chance I get, but I don't have any friends that have one now...I even like to Smell horses!! Ohhh...can't stand it! Have to stop thinking about it! ...Flowers...Weeds...Oh, it Rained this afternoon---Yeah!!! People were smiling, the plants were happy...Yes, Life is Good. =)
Petalpants
Corpus Christi, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 2, 2009
2:20 AM

Post #7015556

Neil, forgot to tell you this: It's quite funny actually...You like your beer warm, whereas over here, people drink their beer cold, in fact, Ice-cold; if it gets room-temperature, they don't want it--- well, unless they're desperate! In the small, convenience stores (where you run in to buy 1 or 2 items), the store usually has cans or bottles of beer in a big barrel of ice for you to buy.
Oh, I forgot, I also love hot cocoa (with marshmallows on top) in the Winter when it is cold outside---no warm ale for me, Ha!
Neil, that is really something that your grandfather was a jockey; when I was young I thought that would be so great to be able to ride fast horses--- and get paid for it! ...but, I grew too tall, anyway! Maybe sometime you can post a pic of your grandfather, if you have any; do you have any of him on a horse, with his little jockey-cap (always liked those), and those little English saddles? You know what kind of saddles we use here, don't you? (Not for racing, but for usual riding, like riding in a pasture)? We use Western saddles, which are big and heavy, like you see in 'Cowboy' movies, but I always saddled my own horses myself, & did all the grooming myself, too... except for horseshoes---had to get a farrier to do that. Here I am on the horse subject again!... =)
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 2, 2009
4:40 AM

Post #7016097

Dear Iris and Petalpants,
Yes, we have come a long way from weeds, but I will try to answer some questions. I am most sorry, you were here in London.
When theses unfortunate incidents occurred, I have been hit on two occasions whilst serving my Country, and once the shrapnel was removed, it was given to me as a souvenir, although I was not in London.
To the British public the attack on the Household cavalry was horrific, for when the bomb went off, it sent nails and everything into the horses, which was a horrendous sight.
The public campaign was immense; I do not think it was ' Black Beauty' or Dick Turpin's ride to York, it was a love for horses.
Everything this small island could send to them, was! People were just taken aback by the carnage.
I was in the Falklands at the time, then came back from that sorrow to this.
The Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment consists of two sabre squadrons,
The Life Guards Squadron and The Blues and Royals Squadron.
There is a Headquarters Squadron including the Quartermaster's Department,
the Riding Instructors, the Training Wing, the Regimental Veterinary Officer
who supervises the Regimental Farriers, and the Regimental Medical Staff.

With 250 horses, it is the Regiment's task to carry out the traditional
ceremonial role of the Household Cavalry - its duties include providing
The Queen's Life Guard daily at Horse Guards, finding all Sovereign's
and other escorts, providing mounted bands, and certain
dismounted duties for the Royal Family and visiting Heads of State.

A sad day in the Regiment's history is 20 July 1982.
On this day, the IRA were responsible for a car-bomb attack on
The Queen's Life Guard, as it proceeded along the side of Hyde Park,
on its way to Horse Guards.

Four men were killed:
Captain Daly, SCpl Bright, L/Cpl Young, and Tpr Tipper.
CoH Pitt (the Guard commander) subsequently received
the BEM for his actions at the scene of the blast.

The horses that died were: Cedric, Epaulette, Falcon, Rochester,
Waterford, Yeastvite, and Zara - three other horses were badly injured,
but subsequently recovered.

To this day, each time The Queen's Life Guard pass the spot where
the bomb was detonated, they bring their swords down from
the "slope" to the "carry" - coupled with an "eyes left" or "eyes right"
- as a mark of ongoing tribute.
I am most sorry Iris for your trip to London, as most people who do come over like the multitude of gardens and the experience.
I do not live in central London, I live on the Kent border.
Proper Ginger beer in stone bottles is easy to get hold off, and is full of flavour.
The wine in the brewery is not all alcoholic, as they use a lot of English hedgerow fruits. That is nice served cold.
Petalpants, big saddles, don't you think the horse has enough to do without more weight?
Here is something I sent, you would like Champagne wouldn't you!
My Granddad was a jockey so he was officially too small to go in the Army, however in the first World War he was conscripted, and he was given the job of riding mules, they pulled ammunition and food up to the front line.
He was a great Horseman, and had an understanding with them, way beyond anything I knew.
On the estate he worked they had a lot of Horses, one racehorse had a tendency to bite. So I was scared of it as it was nasty, he simply walked in put his two fingers in its nose put its head down and had a word with it. It never went for me again!
They had Shires; as a youngster these huge yet beautiful animals, inspired me, I do not know why, but their power and yet gentleness, filled me with a sense of awe.
He used to plough with them, and take me, which I loved. The furrows had to be perfect, not even a quarter of an inch out, as that would show.
The Shires knew what to do anyway. Straight line and keep going, although of course the plough and the Horses did need a tiny bit of adjustment, but Granddad did that!
Every furrow was looked at to make sure, whilst I fussed over the Horses.
He had sixteen Shires in the stables, not all for ploughing, some were used for cart pulling!
Every second I could spend with him was a true pleasure. He taught me how to ride, and the etiquette of riding, which has sadly been lost.
Petalpants the jockey cap is a small helmet, the colours on jockeys and on the caps are called the owners silks!
You were never allowed on a horse unless you could clean; i.e muck them out, groom, then tack them up.
As for marshmallows I do hope you make your own!
Regards to all from England.
Neil.


irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 2, 2009
1:56 PM

Post #7016833

I was not in england for the IRA attack, but for the terriorist attack on the tube & busline ones of a few yrs. ago. I do remember pictures of the down horses in the IRA one. Riding helmets should be a must & not only for jockeys. Our girls were not allowed to ride without them. Our grandaughter lives in Ohio & the same rules apply. Her state 4-H group now mandates them whether you ride English or western, starting this year at 4-H events. The western style riders , having never used them before, were upset. In GD's county 4-H show this yr during one of the riding games had a horse bolt, go through a fence, then across the grounds & crash into a waste dumpster which it had tried to jump. His rider was thrown over the saddle & could not slide back onto it because the horn was blocking her. Her feet were caught in the stirrups & she was on the horse's neck. She was finally thrown into a small equipment moving tractor type vechicle, was able to duck her head so hit it on the helmet surface, instead of her face. Result: level 3 concussion, 9 broken vertibrae. Luckily the breaks were on the side, not near the spinal cord. Her family which had opposed the helmets, now support them as the helmet is the only reason that they still have a daughter. For an eastern state it is a western style riding area which just a few hunt or saddle seat riders. I have seen the RCMP 'ride' exhibiton several times & like the guard regiments ride black horses, although smaller ones it seems. I asked one of their riders & the horses are a thoughbred/hanoverian cross. My GD rides a quarter horse/ mustang cross which was trained for barrel racing, but GD has worked on teacher her to jump, while learning herself. The horses seems to enjoy it as she get bored doing ring work.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 2, 2009
4:54 PM

Post #7017478

Dear Iris, yes I remember that terrible day when you were here, for it was a sad time!
Helmets are compulsory here, and most people wear florescent jackets as well, if riding on the road.
Although I have seen pictures of Mustang horses, I have never ridden one, though of course I would like to.
A lot of the race horses are bred and bought in Ireland, mostly I do believe from Arabic stock.
Unfortunately they can be a bit cantankerous, so I do not have a lot of time for them.
If I go down to Surrey, my friend has Hunters, which he uses for point to point races, that I do enjoy.
As I love the exhilaration, of one of these magnificent animals jumping fences and walls.
Yes I do wear a riding helmet, and because of my metal arm, protection.
I am most pleased you love horses the same way I do.
A pleasure in life so to speak.
Now the Government has banned fox hunting, a lot of the hunts, now resort to drag hunting. Where a scent is laid down for the hounds and the horses follow them.
I have never done that, but i do like point to point races!
My Kindest Regards.
Neil.
Petalpants
Corpus Christi, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 2, 2009
5:34 PM

Post #7017647

Neil, first I have to ask you, How do you make your own marshmallows? I've never seen a recipe for it or even heard of doing it yourself; have you made them before, and if so, How?? Do they taste much different than storebought in a bag? (or should I even ask that?!) Do they turn out kinda in a cube-shape, and most importantly, will they melt in a mug of hot chocolate, and can you toast them over a campfire?! Let me know. =)
That is so awful about that car bomb in 1982; I was trying to think of what I was doing about that time, then I remembered we had adopted our first baby in Dec.1981, so I was doing intense Mommy-work then. I do remember hearing about that incident and how horrible it was! That's nice that they have a 'tribute' when they come to that certain place.
Neil, it sounds like your Grandfather definitely had 'horse-sense', from the stories you told. The reason I used a Western saddle is because that's all they use around here! (I know someone now has an English Riding School here, which is good---I used to want to learn to ride English when I was younger just to see what it was like.) Anyway, I rode bareback alot also, esp. if it was hot; I would hear the horse 'sigh' when I put on the saddle, & feel sorry for him, or her...However, since I was usually around only 100 lbs. anyway, I guess it evened out to a regular person's weight, Ha! But I liked to ride bareback best, and feel the horse's muscles and strength when they moved, and the horse was definitely happier without the extra weight!
Neil, the cowboys in the old days had to have a saddle that was comfortable to ride in all day, and this kind of saddle had all the things they needed when dealing with herds of cattle or horses. Some ranches still use cowboys to round-up herds, while others may use trucks or whatever. There is a super-large "King Ranch" not too far from here; it is a working ranch, but certain days of the year they let tourists in to see part of it; have you ever heard of it?
Iris, have you heard of the King Ranch near Kingsville,TX? That is terrible about that girl getting hurt at that event; I don't know if they wear helmets or not at the 4-H events around here, as we haven't been to one in awhile. Near here (about 20 minutes away) they built a brand new Exhibition place for when they have Livestock Shows & such; it's so nice, and the horse stalls and arena are great! I didn't ever do competition things; I just did pleasure riding, but I like to watch the shows. Two years ago our city had the Lippizaners here; those are the most amazing and beautiful horses I think I have ever seen!
Well, we got rain yesterday (Yeah!), so I'm sure there are Weeds beginning to grow as I write!! =)
Petalpants
Corpus Christi, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 2, 2009
5:44 PM

Post #7017683

Neil, shoot!! Still haven't got those recipes for your Mom; I think I'll just write out the chicken-one, as I really don't have a recipe written down for it. I'll probably send it in a regular email. Tell your Mama Thanks for the nice Rainshower she must have blown across the ocean yesterday!

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 2, 2009
6:53 PM

Post #7017935

Neil- your grandfather also had to have a great sense of balance as racing saddles look like pancakes with stirrups attached. There is a hunt club in our town & they do a drag hunt. There is no open country to follow a real fox. One of the trails crosses our property, although they can't take the hounds through this section anymore because they ran down & attacked a pet scotty. For years the different houses were contacted by phone when the hunt was due so people could keep the animals inside, but the one time it was not done & the problem occurred. The trail system goes through a state park as well as several towns & our daughters used to hack over to their horse shows as we didn't have a trailer. Petalpants: I have heard of the King Ranch, mainly because of their race horses in the 1940s, I grew up in Wisconsin so saw dairy cattle. Must go out & attack weeds in the iris beds. We seem to grow both irisies & weeds this year.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 2, 2009
9:59 PM

Post #7018531

Dear Iris, yes he was very good with any horse, and as you say his balance must have been great, for he made me ride one!
They are also very fit as to stand up on the stirrups, as the jockeys do, requires immense power in your legs and stomach muscles, In fact all your muscles.
Jockeys do not get paid much, which may be surprising, but is true.
They get about $400 a race and 10 % of the winners prize, if they win.
As you may know we have a lot of race tracks here, in fact everywhere you go has one, so to race a horse for 3-4 miles is punishing, especially if you have to do it up to ten times a day, which some of them do. On different horses of course.
I am most sorry to hear that a Scotty was killed, not nice!
However our original English Jack Russell's, were taken out with the hounds and if a fox laid up, the Jack was sent in to either get it out or dispose of it
They had no trouble with the hounds, at all!
In fact my real Jack Russell, never ever backed away from anything, no matter what is was, a ferocious Terrier.
She caught a 31 pound dog fox in a baby Partridge run, and killed it.
The fox was killing the baby Partridges, not that it wanted to eat them, it just the way they are.
It made a bad mistake there, for my Terrier was more than a match for that.
I enclose of picture of her, though she lived till twenty one years old, but is no longer with us.
Petalpants I will send you a D-mail, as my mother says the chickens are still running around waiting for a recipe.
Yes it is raining here and the weeds are growing.
Kind Regards from a wet London.
Neil.



NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 2, 2009
10:01 PM

Post #7018534

My Terrier, a real Jack Russell!
Neil.

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 2, 2009
11:26 PM

Post #7018757

Most Jack Russells here are smooth coated. I can see where the rough coat would be a good protection when fighting foxes. We have foxes here, but the real danger to pets are the coyotes which have increased. They can be a danger to horses as well, but would really help if they got more white-tailed deer which are an overpopulation & need to be thinned, somehow. I have developed mild carpel-tunnel so bought a weeder with a long handle. It gives more leverage so should help. The last time I was in England was for attending the British Iris Society convention in 2007. I doubt if I can go again, as at 74 the walking would be a bit much. I have mainly been on history or gardening tours which are great fun, but a lot of walking. My daughter who lives in Ohio met a retired jockey who invented the 'exerciser' which mimics the motion of a horse & can be used between races to keep the muscles toned. He has started a therapeutic riding center in a nearby town. Grandaughter is not only interested in riding but is thinking of training in that field when she goes to school next yr. I would guess that she enjoys being on horseback so much that she would like to help others enjoy it.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 3, 2009
3:57 AM

Post #7019766

Dear Iris, as I once explained to Petalpants, The Parson John Jack Russell, saw a Terrier on a milk wagon, saw he bought it off the milk seller, that was in Oxfordshire.
As he was a friend of the then King, the King took a liking to this faithful and extremely ferocious Terrier.
So as one does, the Parson, gave it to the King.
The King loved it so much he had an oil painting made of it, our present Queen now has it, and it still hangs on the walls of Buckingham palace. The faithful dog was called "Tip."
Then in the Victorian times, they liked velvet and other materials, so long haired animals were shunned.
Then someone made a mistake, by crossing them with Italian greyhounds. This made them have smooth hair, but also, nervous and snappy!
A proper English Jack Russell, is not a barking, snappy thing, they do what they are told, when they are told.
When I got my one; my father said "only bring it round this house if it is trained," so after a year of training I took her round.
He of course put her through her paces, and she never failed one.
I admit she was a working dog for me; she never jibed at anything, totally fearless in anything she did.
As you may know on farms when they get to certain age they are disposed off.
However she was such a spirit, I could not do that. So I gracefully retired her to my parents.
They loved having her around, and she guarded them like Greyfriars Bobby.
Once whilst my father was in the pub with the dog; a man was bothering him, the man claimed that if you spat on your hand, a dog would not bite you. So he pushed my father and put his down as my dog was sat underneath the chair he was sat on, my Terrier although retired acted instantly and bit him straight through the hand and would not let go, biting deeper, every time he struck her.
My father told her to leave which she did, and instantly went to a heel position so as to protect him.
The man wanted to sue, fortunately he had been warned by the barman and three off duty Policeman, and not to do it.
In another incident; someone tried to steal my mothers handbag.Tess just went for him; getting straight in the calf muscle, and it must have hurt because he fainted.
When the Police got there, he had regained conciseness, was taken to Hospital and then sent to prison.
Tess lived till she was twenty one years old, a fair old age for such a loyal animal.
Her spirit lives on however, for she had pups and they have had pups and so on, but have never been crossed, with anything other than a real "Jack."
So now at the age of 82 years old, she feels a bit vulnerable going down to the local shops etc, as my father is blind and goes to the pub twice a week although he does not drink alcohol, he misses a terrier too.
So my quest is to get one from Tessie's stock, train it and then, it is for my parents.
As for your Grandaughter that is a wonderful and enjoying sound, to help others.
I am disabled and a caseworker of the Royal British Legion, so I help out a lot of people.
Sometimes difficult people and other one's that are most helpful and nice, so I burn the candle at all ends always doing something.
But you get a magic feeling if you can help someone out, although, we are of course not allowed to accept gifts of any sort.
Although we are allowed to have a cup of tea.
You are never too old to do anything!
Regards from a sodden and windy London.
Neil.




irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 3, 2009
2:06 PM

Post #7020639

Thank you for the history of the 'Jacks'. We used to raise cocker spaniels (American) & certainly know that different blood lines produce different temperments. If fox terriers can be rough coat or smooth, why can't others. The AKC finally recognizes them under the name of Parson Russell terriers. I think GD's interest in the riding stems from the fact that she loves horseback riding so much. She also has 'apaxia' which is the difficulty in physically forming words. It is a fairly mild case as her speech teacher says that in some people, they can't talk at all. It has been some yrs since she was teased by the other kids and a friend who has cerebral palsy has trouble with muscle control but gets along fine. She has also learned patience with horses. After a yr of lunging 'Alice' (her horse) in a round pen, she found that she will listen to the signals in a larger arena. She had been away on a class trip & asked her mother what she did to make Alice behave. Mom's reply ' you did it with all the work'. She can be seen riding on the equine forum under the 'fair results' thread. So this is her last yr of high school and 'Alice' is about the same age & still things cones in a ring mean running ,although she realizes the difference in tack for what she is asked to do; probably the weight of the saddle. My trouble walking is arthritis in my ankles, spine as well but a wrap around back brace helps that. Our heavy rain was in June, sorry that you are having so much now.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 3, 2009
8:59 PM

Post #7022266

Dear Iris, the Parson Russell also bred Fox terriers and started the Kennel club!
However he was asked to judge a dog show at Crystal palace; the Victorians who did not like rough coated dogs, as they made a mess on their velvet furniture, carpets or curtains, had bred Fox terriers to have a smooth coat.
Well as he was quite famous,he went to the show (Grand Exhibition), unfortunately all the Fox terriers were smooth coated, so he refused to judge them.
As he mounted his Horse, he was asked why? He simply replied " I have not seen a Fox terrier today, so how can I judge them."
It is great to hear about your Grandaughter, what a wonderful thing to happen, I can only wish her all the best, and please give her our Regards from England!
A friend, I served in the Army with, wife's got cancer which is a terrible thing as she is 46, and has three children.
Luckily they managed to cure her, but she was in Hospital a long time, and there was a lot of physiotherapy to be done.
To get fit she took up riding, only gentle stuff at first, in the stables near us.
She loves it, and has progressed to going round a circle.
She also took up gardening and fishing.
As many of our fishing areas have disabled access (by law), she likes the solitude and peacefulness, as well as looking at the plants.
My Kind Regards from a wet and windy England.
Neil.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 3, 2009
11:31 PM

Post #7022763

My only problem with fishing is that you have to eat them after you catch them. It is a good excuse for enjoying scenery. GD and her Mom are annoyed when they are told that horseback riding is not a sport, so were happy when they found the following (origin unknown.)

TO ALL THOSE PEOPLE MWHO SAY HORSEBACK RIDING ISN'T A SPORT

I doubt a softball will step on your foot and break a toe.
I don't think a football will run the other way when you call it.
I highly doubt your track shoes will buck you out of them.
I don't think your tennis racket will stop moving in the middle of a match and refuse to start going again, or your golf club will start swinging wildly on its own.
I don't know of many bicycles that will try and move away or bite you in the butt when you get on.
Most 'sports' equipment does not weigh 1,000 pounds and have a mind of its own.
However most equipment does not give you the love, companionship, and complete trust that a horse does
Horseback riding not a sport?
If you really think about it, horseback riding is the ULTIMATE sport...Two minds working as one.
Sorry you aren't brave enough to try it.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 4, 2009
12:42 AM

Post #7023048

Dear Iris, I have copied this and will read it to my father, as it is quite wonderful!
As for fishing, in this Country any fish (unless you are game fishing), must be put back alive.
You would be in serious trouble if it wasn't.
Trout and Salmon may be kept, but only over a certain size.
Luckily they have many waterside stands for the Disabled, with wheelchair access.
We have a reservoir near us that has them, it is $16.00 in your money for the day.
For that you are allowed four fish, which are your Rainbow Trout.
As all the fish are stocked, you can catch your amount in a day.
They are all over 3-4 pounds in weight, so that easily pays for the fee, and the pleasures of going.
Then you have the beauty of the wonderful plants and insects.
I do not know why they keep putting an edit note on anything I write.
Maybe they do not like my English?
Regards from a windy, cold and wet London.
Neil.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 4, 2009
3:25 AM

Post #7023780

Neil The edit notes have not been showing up on the screen here. I passed along your greetings to my daughter to tell to GD. My daughter had called tonight to ask about dividing & resetting a siberian iris which had developed a 'hole' in the middle of its clump. It had been in place for awhile. She said that she had ridden this afternoon, as GD had band practice. She is a member of the school marching band which plays at football games. Sorry that your rain has not stopped. We have just had a bit from the Atlantic hurricanes which rained out one day of a 2 day horse show. Cool temps otherwise which left time for garden work. Will cut back siberian iris foliage the first week in Oct.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

September 4, 2009
4:58 AM

Post #7024029

Dear Iris, it is not the rain that bothers me as we always get that, it is the wind!
I have been to Siberia whilst doing a job for my University, and the wind at the moment has such a raw feeling to it.
It literally cuts through you right to the bone, definitely jumpers and a hot pie weather.
I did ask on the recipes forum for a pecan oie recipe that you have on Thanksgiving day.
My mother who is 82 wants it, as she loves when she is well enough to bake.
So far I have had one reply, but it was in cups and I need one in ounces.
We have a Harvest festival so she would like to make it for my nieces.
If you do know anybody that can help, I would be most grateful.
I have my Grandma's diary when she was in service in a big country house in North Yorkshire, she cooked for Winston Churchill and the King, so if there is anything you want please ask.
Regards to all.
Neil.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 4, 2009
2:31 PM

Post #7025002

Neil, I was not put in as having logged in so will redo my answer in case you didn't receive it. 1 cup=8 ounces. I did realize there was a recipe forum, never looked for one as I am not much of a cook & don't bake. We can get pies had a nearby orchard (including pecan). But I hope the measurement note will help. I see by rereading this thread that they have not 'edited' out my typos. I do use an English recipe for roast beef & yorkshire pudding at Christmas. It is the type which lies flat under the roast, not puffed up.

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