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Article: Cut, pot, repeat: Saving annuals for next year's garden: HOW timely, Sally!

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Forum: Article: Cut, pot, repeat: Saving annuals for next year's gardenReplies: 7, Views: 72
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Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

August 30, 2009
3:56 PM

Post #7004642

Just today, I was outside looking for cell-packs, my mind set on--FINALLY_ taking my Coleus cuttings. Been meaning to do it for a couple of weeks...
Then i remembered seeing your article this morning and I put the brakes on all my ambitions until I read your article.

I DO want to save my beautiful, colorful, Sun Coleus. Those things cost $3 each in the Spring--as they are considered "specialty annuals"...
What did I learn from your article??? That ONE cutting NOW will give me 4-5 cuttings in late Winter.
I was thinking of taking 2-3 of each now--and wondering just how well they would last through the Winter????

Question: In late Winter--after you take cuttings again--do you allow the mama plant to continue growing and plant her/him as well? Or, do you discard it? Especially if they have been growing in water. I am, more and more, preferring the directly in the soil mix method.

Thanks for a wonderful article--like ALL that you write!

Gita
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

August 30, 2009
4:26 PM

Post #7004742

Gita, I take several cuttings of each, just as insurance. If my mother plant has been growing in a pot (except for the really big combo pots) I bring those in also and treat as house plants. I have some mother coleus plants going on their 3rd year.
I start all my cuttings in damp soil and also use rooting hormone, but they root so easily you could skip the hormone.
This year I plan to mix up a large batch of insectial soap and spray everything. Last year the spider mites and fungus gnats gave me a hard time.

Sally, keep those articles coming.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

August 30, 2009
7:36 PM

Post #7005411

Thanks as always for your kind comments!
Gita to be honest, I know the technique works but haven't done it with Coleus with enough experience to advise YOU. I see ladygardener does!

I kept the mama of that Begonia in her pot last fall , took cuttings, and also potted her up this spring--she has grown beautifully but is probably getting kind of congested at the base, you know how the wingy, caney Begonias do like your giant one. She's getting kind of bigfor me to keep in winter so I'm only going to keep cuttings of her.
Last winter I had a green and gold Plectranthus mama. from which I took cuttings and took those plants to the Swap. The mama Plectranthus was becoming kind of rootbound--I think that's the real test, if the soil in Mama's pot is still in good shape, she will probably grow fine in spring, If not, then just use babies and let her retire.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

August 30, 2009
11:33 PM

Post #7006043

Thank you both for your advice...
For me, taking cuttings and propagating is the bane of my existence! I am always running out of room in the Winter to keep things in. Now, I am adding pots of Coleus--and who knows what else! Yikes!

Gita
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

August 31, 2009
1:18 AM

Post #7006416

Gita, I'm in the same boat, every year I seem to add more and more. I have run out of window space and in the basement I need to add more lights keeping in mind that I have to reserve room for my seed starting in Feb and March. There are the MUST haves and the "I want to just try this" . Plus growing the extra tomato and pepper plants " just in case some don't grow and the Oh well, the girls at work will take the extras.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2009
1:39 AM

Post #7006518

I agree! SO hard to let anything die in the cold if you know you could let it live overwinter in the house. But why? There's a yard full of stuff that dies every year and I don't feel bad about them.
stefpix
Brooklyn, NY

August 31, 2009
12:56 PM

Post #7007880

if "Annuals" can survive indoors as houseplants then they are not annuals! just plants that not survive a cold winter!
I bought some annual Geraniums at Home Depot. I always thought that Geraniums are perennial.

anyway at these big stores they sell Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium orchids whose labels suggest to discard the plant after it is done blooming "... we'll grow more".

Anyway I like the idea of saving the plants and saving the bucks!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2009
2:47 PM

Post #7008333

Right you are stefpix! As I said, the term annual is not really a botanical differentiation for certain plants; it's more a description of how they are usually cultured for landscaping purposes I suppose. Therefore, the door is wide open to experiment.
Geraniums (zonal) ARE tough. Just not cold hardy. They can be allowed to dry out in the pot, or even uprooted, for winter in a basement and then often can be revived --but that's a topic for another article--which may have already been done in DG, I'm not sure offhand.

Here's a thought--next time we see that label on the done-bloomed clearance orchids at Home Depot etc, lets point it out to manager and stand by the dumpster with open arms, instead of paying the ten bucks or so they still ask!
Thanks for reading and adding your comments!

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Other Article: Cut, pot, repeat: Saving annuals for next year's garden Threads you might be interested in:

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