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Fuchsias: When/How are you most successful at propigating fuchsias?

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Rarejem
(Julie)South Prairie, WA
(Zone 7a)

September 2, 2009
8:14 PM

Post #7018200

OK Melody, I won't wait for the popular crowd to jump out on the dance floor...I will be brave and get things started myself.

I love my hardy fuchsias and would love to hear peoples suggestions on the best ways to propigate them. I find that in our area, now is the perfect time to try cuttings, but I am definitely a novice as far as fuchsias go. When do you propigate? How do you do it? I am sure that lots of us would love to know.

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PNWMountainGirl
(Sharon)SouthPrairie, WA
(Zone 7a)

September 2, 2009
8:15 PM

Post #7018211

Yes, Melody, thank you for this forum.
Here in the PNW it is definitely prime time for fuschia pictures, propagation, and discussions. We are fortunate to have a climate that is good for both potted and hardy plants.

It is now getting cool here, with temps in the 70's and nite temps in the 50's. Fuschias love it. Liz, I think you are hotter, I think I would wait a bit, though I haven't had experience elsewhere with fuschias.
lizzipa
Emerald Hills, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 2, 2009
9:32 PM

Post #7018453

I think someone talked about the proper method to propagate fuschia's in the old thread (that requested the forum), but I would love it if someone would repeat or bring that info. over here. I know that I've never had luck starting them in water, but I recently stuck several pieces in the dirt in the pot, where my fuschia was growing , & one of the pieces appears to have rooted!

Liz
hummer_girl
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 2, 2009
9:53 PM

Post #7018516

Here's a link to one of the threads mentioned in the Discussion Forum on propagating F. Gartenmeister. Should work for other fuchsia varities, I would think. I'm going to try it.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1028348/

This message was edited Sep 2, 2009 4:53 PM
lizzipa
Emerald Hills, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 2, 2009
10:17 PM

Post #7018560

Thanks hummer_girl. That's exactly the discussion I was thinking of... as I thought it mentioned it mentioned spring as the best season to propagate.
hummer_girl
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 3, 2009
12:26 AM

Post #7018919

I've sent Melody a list of the fuchsia threads we all listed in the Discussion Forum, so she can switch info into our new forum.
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

September 3, 2009
12:45 AM

Post #7018983

I always just stick my fuchsia cutting in the ground in the fall. Always do more than you want and most will survive. I don't use rooting hormone, just clip off the leaves and make sure the soil is firmed-up around the cutting. THis is for hardies.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 9, 2009
10:42 PM

Post #7045397

I am going to be making cuttings. So I will take some photos of them as examples of what I consider a good cutting to look like. And I'll write a bit about why I like or dislike which ones.
Sometimes, if I am in a big hurry and accidently break a branch off of a plant, I do the same thing as Willowwind2, with just my hands (if I am not holding clippers, ha, ha) I removed all of the leaves except for a couple at the end, then I jam it as far down into the soil of pot as I can. If there is a stick nearby, I'll use that to make the hole instead, to lessen the damage to the branch when it gets shoved into the soil.
Most of the time, these survive and add to the bush.
Occasionally, I will strip the broken piece, leaving a couple of leaves at the end, and bury it lengthwise just below the surface. But only if I am going to be watering right away and if the weather is going to be cool and/or foggy for a couple of days. When these survive, they put out new growth all along the length of the buried branch. I especially do this with new varieties that haven't grown into big bushes yet.
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

September 9, 2009
10:45 PM

Post #7045402

That's good to know about the lengthwise cutting. I also do some very nicely in pots.^_^
hummer_girl
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 10, 2009
5:01 PM

Post #7047800

P.C.: niffty trick burying the cutting length ways. Thanks!
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

September 11, 2009
12:54 AM

Post #7049450

PC, The fuchsia plants I am going to send you have bloosoms on them. And they are just a year old. Stuck in the ground last year. They are also about eight inches high.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
1:09 AM

Post #7049511

Cool! I am glad you are feeling up to it now :-)
Let me know if I have anything you'd like!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
6:49 PM

Post #7051962

For some stupid reason, the first time I try and send anything with a photo attached, my computer hangs up on me. So, I am going to send the photos first, then write about them. I don't want to have to write it all again!
Here are cuttings 1 and 2

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
6:49 PM

Post #7051965

3 and 4

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
6:50 PM

Post #7051966

5, 6 and 7

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
7:03 PM

Post #7052022

Okay! Now, fyi, everywhere a leaf connects with a stem on a plant, there are embroyonic stem cells call Apical Meristem. These cells can become anything the plant needs. And it is why, for most plants, it is very important to have at least one node in contact with the soil or buried in the soil.
I won't be tossing out any of the cuttings shown, because sometimes you have to go with what you got and just hope they all make it. But some are better than others and here is why.
1. This cutting has too much stem below the bottom node and if it rots, it will take the whole cutting down.
2. This cutting is perfect. Not too much foliage left to support with no root system, there are two nodes instead of just one to go below the surface, and the distance between the nodes is not too long. If there were any flowers or flower buds, they were removed.

This message was edited Sep 11, 2009 12:17 PM
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
7:08 PM

Post #7052034

3. This one is iffy. Yes, there is all of that bare stem below the node that could rot, but this time the stem is needed for stability. And I needed this cutting, so I didn't want to chance destroying it by trying to seperate them into two cuttings. One of which would have been far too small.
4. This is a classic cutting. Two nodes. One with foliage, one for the new roots. It will also produce two new shoots instead of just the one for cutting number 2. But cutting number two is way ahead in terms of the number of apical meristem cells turned on and going for growth at the tip it already has going!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
7:10 PM

Post #7052041

5. This looks like a great cutting. And if it survives, it will make a great plant. But it is a bit too big and has too much to support with no root system. So I am going to be sure to bury it deep.
6. This one is very weak. The stem is very thin. But it could make it.
7. This one is way too small. Again, it could make it. But it is going to take longer for it to become a plant than a better cutting would.

I hope this helps! ;-) And good luck!
PC
lizzipa
Emerald Hills, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
8:38 PM

Post #7052329

PedricksCorner,

Thanks for the illustrated lesson - great info.!

Liz
PNWMountainGirl
(Sharon)SouthPrairie, WA
(Zone 7a)

September 11, 2009
8:44 PM

Post #7052354

Yes, thank you, PC. Do you also have thoughts about timing?
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
9:55 PM

Post #7052561

Now!
Ha, ha! It is still warm enough for them to get rooted and grow just a bit and then be tucked in for the winter. They might be too small to survive the winter outdoors in areas like your PNW, but I hear they can be grown indoors and I am going to try it this winter for the first time!
Getting them started now is going to give you a huge jump on next spring.
The only thing I'd have to ad about keeping them indoors for the winter is to make certain rooted and growing plants get at least two hours of direct winter sun from a window.
PNWMountainGirl
(Sharon)SouthPrairie, WA
(Zone 7a)

September 11, 2009
10:05 PM

Post #7052600

I keep the sensative ones in the greenhouse for the winter. But...they do seem to be whitefly magnets there. What to do?
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 11, 2009
10:17 PM

Post #7052625

I've rarely had a problem with whiteflies. Sometimes the maggot of a little gnat gets intot the soil indoors and I see them when I occasionally pour liquid fertilizer over the bark in my dendrobiums. Then I see them floating in the liquid down in the pepples of the trays. But that is usually just because of the constantly moist soil. I don't believe those do any damage and are just eating dead plant material like our friends the earthworms do. U have never seen anykind of damage from them.
Have you actually seen White flies, not just gnats? Because there is a tape they are attracted to that you can use. Or SaferSoap spray. But you must be careful to really soak underneath the leaves where they like to hang out and lay their eggs.
I hope you don't have White Flies!
hummer_girl
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 11, 2009
10:35 PM

Post #7052693

P.C.: great demo. Do you use root hormone? Can't remember if you said whether you do, or not. I think Willowwind2 said she didn't.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 12, 2009
1:02 AM

Post #7053394

Nope, haven't used it in over 25 years! But, that doesn't mean it wouldn't be useful for plants that are difficult to root because they just are naturally slow growers and tend to rot before they can put out roots. Usually woody perennials such as herbs and other plants that are drought tolerant types. I just compensate by making more cuttings than I need from those plants. Fuchsias though, shouldn't need it.
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

September 12, 2009
1:31 AM

Post #7053507

If you use root hormone you should dip it and tap most of it off. Too much is bad for the plant. I don't use it because I don't care to have a bunch of new plants. I just stick in a few cutting once in a while to see what they do. Usually hydreangea and fuchsia because they are easy.
Azorina
(Linda)Gig Harbor, WA
(Zone 8a)

September 12, 2009
4:07 AM

Post #7054114

PC= Thankyou for the lesson...I have gained a new passion for hardy fuschias and I finding my self ripping out plants to make room for more. This is Fuchsia exoniensis.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 12, 2009
5:39 PM

Post #7055514

Wow, that is a really cool fuchsia!
I hear that the species are getting very popular, but I had no idea they could be that colorful!
I wonder what the berries taste like.
One of my most recent purchases is a Fuchsia boliviana which is not the alba and according to the Northwest Fuchsia Society it is mislabeled as Fuchsia corymbiflora. They say that according to Berry (the bottom line in the fuchsia world) that name is not to be used any more. I also have the alba form. But it is the fruit from this one, with the long red flowers, that they actually sell in the fruit markets of Brazil. It is supposed to have a dried fig like flavor. I can't wait for it to get bigger and produce!
Ha, ha, someday, we can have a big RU here and we can all do a fuchsia berry tasting party! What cheese goes with that berry!?

This message was edited Sep 12, 2009 10:40 AM
Azorina
(Linda)Gig Harbor, WA
(Zone 8a)

September 13, 2009
11:10 AM

Post #7058231

I guess we would have a do a cheese/wine testing and get a new culunary perspective going! LOL
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 14, 2009
9:12 PM

Post #7064078

Hmm, I know they dry the berries and I know they have been made into jams, now you have me wondering what a fuchsia berry liquor or wine would taste like ;-D
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 27, 2009
6:40 PM

Post #7109873

Here is an example of how resiliant fuchsias can be. These fuchsia cuttings arrived completely wilted, despite the best efforts of the person who sent them.
If I didn't know better, I'd of assumed they were "toast."
This photo was after I had them totally imersed in cool water for about an hour.
Then to speed their absorbtion of water, I cut each branch in half.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 27, 2009
6:42 PM

Post #7109880

This is about three hours later.
Remarkable difference, eh?
They have been made into cuttings and this Wednesday, the cuttings will be a week old. I will take of photo of them then and post it here. Then I will try to document their continued progress.

This message was edited Sep 27, 2009 11:43 AM

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GardenersCorner
Palm Bay, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 29, 2009
1:20 AM

Post #7114775

Wow what a difference !
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 30, 2009
5:22 PM

Post #7120193

As promised, here are the cuttings one week later, they are the ones in the two bottom rows of the photo. Progress reports will follow! Which reminds me, I should also take another photo of the Gartenmeister cuttings. Actually, since they are growing so well, I guess I can call them plants now ;-)

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 30, 2009
5:24 PM

Post #7120201

Ahh, wrong photo! Ha, ha, they will let you edit your post, but not the photo!

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GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

October 2, 2009
10:21 PM

Post #7128120

Pedrick
Thanks for posting the Flash cuttings and the progress!
It amazing how quickly they revived from the shipping. I really didn't think they would wilt so badly because I cut them then placed them in water for an hour before packing them up. Even spritzed them with water before rolling them in the newpaper.

They sure look like they are doing good in the last photo! Hope you will have plenty to grace your beautiful Fuchsia Garden.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 3, 2009
12:26 AM

Post #7128604

I'll send another photo next week. Let's see if you guys can tell when they have made the transition from cuttings to rooted plants that have begun to grow.
I don't have a greenhouse (yet!) so I use the cool ground on the north side of the house. I keep them covered with a breathable "seed" cloth and there is a timer attached to the faucet with a misting nozzle on the end of a hose that goes off every two hours. I just turn the water off in the evening to keep it from misting them at night. Especially now that it is getting cooler.
As the danger now is more from mold and fungus than from drying out. It is also the time of year when I can hope for 100% survival rate if I am careful and monitor them.
One important aspect of making cuttings one needs to bear in mind, is that not only do different types of plant root at different rates, even different varieties of the same species can have radically different growth rates. This is absolutely true of fuchsia varieties.
Grace McCarthy, Walz Bella, and a mystery fuchsia is in the same tray with Flash. It will be interesting to see who roots first!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 7, 2009
8:27 PM

Post #7145332

Here we are one week later! Everyone is doing okay. Lost a few leaves. That is to be expected. And it is VERY important to check once a day for dropped leaves because they will rot and spread mold and fungus all around them!!
So these are two week old cuttings now.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 14, 2009
2:06 AM

Post #7166646

Well, I built spiffy new digs for cuttings and seedlings. And so far, everyone seems to like it in there. With todays high winds and torential rains, I was really afraid my little "greenhouse" would blow away!! But nothing even flapped around :-)
Must be all the clamps I put all over it. All of the fuchsia bushes were getting tossed pretty good though. I almost got a shot of a hummingbird trying to hang onto a branch of F. magellanica, but then that twig broke and I don't know where he relocated to. We had over 4 inches of rain so far in the last 24 hours and it isn't over yet.
So if the weather permits, tomorrow I will take that weekly photo of the tray of cuttings to show how they are doing.
I am hoping to be able to trap some of the heat that escapes from the window above. Later on, I am going to extend the plastic to up above it.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 14, 2009
8:41 PM

Post #7169066

Three weeks and doing okay! There were a couple of casualties, but that is to be expected. It is very rare to get 100%. I've probably already mentioned this, but different fuchsias ( just as all plants) grow at different rates. The ones that grow the fastest have the highest survival rate. Grace McCarthy is in the back of the tray and just trucking along fine! I am not using my breathable seed cloth on them anymore, as they are in my mini-greenhouse now. There is better air circulation. Which is both good and bad. Good because the fungi don't like it, bad because the newer cuttings can handle it. So the really new ones, will still get covered.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 14, 2009
8:43 PM

Post #7169074

Here is a side view. In a couple of weeks, I'll give them a very, very gentle tug to see if they are rooted. If they don't give, they are. If they slide out, of course they are not. The bright green leaves lead me to believe they are indeed growing though!

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GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

October 17, 2009
12:23 PM

Post #7178767

Looking Good!
Like your little Greenhouse! Hope you didn't get too much rain and bad weather!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 21, 2009
5:16 PM

Post #7193884

Yes, we got over 4" of rain and it got very windy, but my little greenhouse didn't even flap around in the high gusts of wind. I used very heavy clear vinyl and lots of clamps, so far so good! There is now a plastic roof under the clear plastic. I bought what is actually supposed to be a ceiling cover for flourescent lights. It is like a square honeycomb. White and about 1 inch thick. As the weather here goes to both extremes this time of year. One minute it is in the 40's and by midday it's in the high 80's. The greenhouse needed a breathable roof and this is working very well along with some black shade cloth I can drape over the sides to keep the full sun from hitting the new cuttings. Cold winter sun is going to be essential later on.

Here are the Flash cuttings at 4 weeks now.
I know it doesn't look like there has been any changes, but that is a good thing!
No more loses, no mold and fungus, and everyone is a bright healthy green. They are just busy making roots and we'll know when they suddenly start to grow, that they have been successful.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 29, 2009
1:56 AM

Post #7218774

Here we are at five weeks and these guys are already doing much better than the poor neglected Gartenmeister Bonstedt's did! This is the difference more care can make. These guys have also been benefiting from my new mini greenhouse. It gets up to the 80's in there even on a cold windy day like today. Because the sun it out.
If you look close, you will see that both Flash and Grace McCarthy have also formed a few flower buds!
I gave them a gentle tug and they are definately rooted. And if you look close, you can see that they have new growth.
Time for them to move up into a sunnier portion of the greenhouse :-)

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 29, 2009
2:04 AM

Post #7218797

A bit of a closer look.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 29, 2009
2:32 AM

Post #7218904

Willowwind2 sent me some beautiful cuttings and one rooted plant. They arrived today in wonderful condition. I believe the rooted one (which I potted up before the photo) is Fuchsia magellanica.
Of the cuttings, she mentioned the one with foliage like the magellanica, has larger flowers, so I am thinking perhaps it is F. magellanica var 'Riccartonii.' We will find out!
The one with tiny leaves, I believe is F. minutiflora. I have a F. microphylla and it's flowers aren't quite as tiny and don't have the so very bright "cerise" sepals this one does. Making cuttings for minutiflor and microphylla is a bit of a challenge!
I will post photos of everyones progress.
I'd also like to mention Willowwind2's use of a beverage cup with it's lid as a means of transporting the bareroot plant. It worked great! And the base of the cuttings were wrapped in wet papertowels. Sopping wet and in plastic bags with the foliage inside of the bags as well. It worked great!

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 29, 2009
2:38 AM

Post #7218928

PS The stake in the photo is actually a dried stem from my Jerusalem Artichoke harvest this year. They can grow to over 8 feet tall and be over an inch accross at the base. So when they die, I cut them and stack them to dry so I can use them in place of bamboo. They don't last as long as bamboo, and aren't as strong. But most of the time, what I am using them for, doesn't require permanent support anyway.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 7, 2009
3:10 AM

Post #7249294

Here is the Magellanica Willowind2 sent me just over a week ago. I cut it back a bit after potting it up. And I've decided to keep it indoors as part of my experiment in growing fuchsias indoors. So far, it is doing very well! It not only arrived in bareroot form, the soil was regular soil from the ground, not potting soil. As you can see though, it didn't mind at all, it arrived in excellent condition.

This message was edited Nov 6, 2009 7:28 PM

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Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 7, 2009
3:15 AM

Post #7249311

Is it better to have them growing in potting soil? Mine are all out in the garden.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 7, 2009
3:17 AM

Post #7249319

And here is a photo of the tray of cuttings made from the three varieties Willowwind2 sent, including the cuttings made from the plant I potted up. They are just over a week old now and are being kept out doors in a mini-greenhouse with no heat yet. So they are exposed to a temperature range of low 40's to high 80's almost daily.
The tray with Flash is doing well also. Those haven't changed much, so I am waiting for the flower buds they are producing to put on a bit more color before I post another photo of them.

This message was edited Nov 6, 2009 7:26 PM

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 7, 2009
3:25 AM

Post #7249343

Willowwind2, don't worry, you did fine starting that guy! Yes, they would grow better in potting soil. But it doesn't have to be potting soil. Potting soil is isn't really soil at all if you look closely at it. It is just better for rooting cuttings and potted plants because it is lighter and can hold both more water and more air than regular ground soil. So there is room in a pot for more roots. Which is vital for potted plants. Because a plant in the ground will generally have a root mass twice the size of the plant you see above ground. That can't happen in the small containers and pots we ask plants to grow in!! So we have to help them out by providing something to allow for more roots in a smaller space. The plant you sent was very, very healthy and doing just great!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 12, 2009
6:39 PM

Post #7267494

One of the Flash starts is blooming :-)
When making cuttings, I do my best to remove any flower buds from tip cuttings. Even little tiny green ones. As the cutting needs to be putting energy into growing rooots, not flowers. But it is not unusual for fuchsia starts to bloom as soon as they have a few roots. They are not quite ready to transplant. And if it was spring, I'd say it wouldn't be long now. This tray gets to stay in the mini greenhouse for the winter. I might transplant one Flash to bring indoors. I am going to start a new thread today about growing fuchsias indoors.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 12, 2009
6:50 PM

Post #7267543

And Willowwind2, here are your little babies in their second week. The row in the back is a lantana I have been meaning to make cuttings of. It is a rosy orange one and has been swallowed up by the plumbago it was potted with. This summer, it finally made it's way up throught the plumbago canes into the sunshine. There is no way to seperate the two. They have both (as well as a struggling Princess Bush) grown down through the bottom of the pot and the pot itself is falling apart.
The Princess Bush (Tibouchina urvilleana) was supposed to be the main plant in that container years ago...
Anyway! Everyone is doing well in this tray :-)

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Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 12, 2009
10:54 PM

Post #7268238

They are looking good. You are brave to take so many small cuttings off the larger ones.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 13, 2009
12:01 AM

Post #7268466

Thanks! I felt that the plant would adjust better to being transplanted, if the root system didn't have as much foliage to support. So since I needed to trim it up a bit anyway, I figured I might as well make some cuttings.
And it turns out I was able to sneak a few Princess Bush cuttings in there as well. Tibouchina urvilleana is one of my favorite plants and I was really sad that the person who decided to prune that container some years back, almost destroyed it. Just a few wisps have been able to squeeze their way out of the plumbago and as soon as I see a bit worth making a cutting of, I do. I have two one gallons now and one of those is about to bloom! I was looking for sources here at DavesGarden today, and a nursery in Canada sells them as houseplants! I would never have thought of them as houseplants.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

November 14, 2009
11:17 PM

Post #7274450

Love all the pictures and information about rooting fuchsias. I love F. also. Thank you for taking the time to share the pictures and information.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 15, 2009
8:40 PM

Post #7276894

Thanks! I hope we will be hearing from you!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 18, 2009
8:20 PM

Post #7287065

Here are Willowwind2's cuttings in their third week. Every single one is doing fine. Even though the temps get down into the high 30's at night now. The temps in the mini greenhouse oftern get up to almost 80 in there when the sun is out.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 18, 2009
8:25 PM

Post #7287088

And here is one of the Flash cuttings right before I transplanted it to bring indoors. Future photos of the progress of the Flash cuttings will be posted to the thread I started on growing fuchsias indoors. So will photos of the F. magellanica Willowwind2 send with the cuttings.
You can see that after 8 weeks, this Flash start has a nice ball of healthy white roots! If you saw how they looked when they arrived (photos were posted here in Sept), then you can see how tough fuchsias can be and what they can survive.

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GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2009
10:52 AM

Post #7292150

Thank for keeping us informed and providing photos of the progress on your cuttings. They sure look good and I'm impressed with the root system on Flash. The stem and leaves sure look healthy too!!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 3, 2009
8:31 PM

Post #7332078

Here are Willowwind2's cuttings in their 5th week. Everyone is doing fine. I lost a few of my Princess Bush cuttings, but I was expecting that. They don't root well in the cold. The lantana look fine though.
Sometimes it is a bit dicey to combine different plants in one tray because the growth rates and needs can be so different. But fuchsias themselves have a wide range of differences also. You can have 100% success with one cultivar and have every single one of another cultivar right next to it, die.
Still haven't identified these guys Willowwind2. All I know is that the Encliandra type you have, is not the same as the one I already had. I think it is a F. minutiflora instead of a F. microphylla. The leaves are so much tinier!

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Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

December 3, 2009
11:00 PM

Post #7332566

Aw, they look so good.

GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

December 16, 2009
2:09 AM

Post #7372759

Lookin Good! Sure hope your cool spell hasn't caused any problems with them.

We started getting some freezing weather the end of November so I took some cutting of 'Flash and Margaret'. I knew it was late in the season for doing this but thought I would give it a try.
I found some peat pots I had stashed and a clear tub type container and so far they are doing really good. I noticed some roots growing out of two of them today so I will have some indoor Fuchsias for the winter.
:)

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 16, 2009
2:27 AM

Post #7372809

Yours are looking very healthy and vigorous GGK! I will make sure to post an update tomorrow. The minigreenhouselet (as my friends call it) has been doing a great job. And I am very glad I used clear plastic roofing. As I was able to take the shade cloth off of the southern side of it and now every shelf is getting lots of winter sun. The seed warming pad under the lowest shelf, did a great job of keeping the temps above freezing in there. Ha, I look forward to your posts in the "Indoor Fuchsia" thread now!
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

December 16, 2009
3:58 AM

Post #7373035

Hi PC, I took a couple of tiny pieces of that miniature and just stuck them back in the pot when I took your cuttings and they are still alive. They are outside so they aren't growing.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 17, 2009
2:47 AM

Post #7375771

Here are Willowwind2's cuttings in their 7th week. I know they look the same as before, but that is a remarkable thing. As they are outdoors and it is winter. The little minigreenhouselet is not heated. It only has a heated seed warming pad under the very bottom shelf that keeps them from freezing because heat rises. If it is a sunny day, it can still get up to 80 degrees in there and some fuchsias are blooming. But again, I am just thrilled that everything is alive!

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 17, 2009
2:54 AM

Post #7375796

I am sure yours are doing well out there Willowwind2! They probably had plenty of time to send out good roots and will surprise you in the spring.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 30, 2009
11:47 PM

Post #7411148

Here is one of the Flash's at 14 weeks. He is busy getting ready to bloom. And he is being grown indoors in a southern facing window. For progress on other fuchsias being grown indoors as blooming houseplants, we have thread here called, "Indoor Fuchsias." I can't wait to see him bloom!

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GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2010
9:26 AM

Post #7415666

PC
They are all looking so good! Nice to see a healthy bunch of cuttings turning into future bloomers! Flash is sure doing good. I was thinking about growing a couple of standards for this year and Flash is one I want to use. Another one is Lady boothby.

Both Flash and L. boothby are really avid growing fuchsias from what I've observed so I may get good quick results.

Here is an update on my cuttings I lost 3 but they are doing quite well.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 2, 2010
2:58 AM

Post #7418386

Yes, yours are looking good too! I wonder, are you fertilizing them and if so, with what and how much? They certainly are a healthy green. And when you make your standards, how are you going to over winter them? Did you read the home page article, where the author even uses warm Christmas lights to keep things warm?

GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 2, 2010
9:39 AM

Post #7418966

Thanks PC
I have not as of yet fertilized any of them. I was thinking about doing just a foliage spray feeding. I have miracle grow do you think that will be ok to use? I'm new at this winter time propagation, I usually do it during the late Spring outdoors.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 2, 2010
11:18 PM

Post #7421052

I realize that there are fertilizer which advertise feeding via the foliage. But I don't like the idea in general. I would be concerned about excess salts drying onto the surface of the leaves. I prefer to use a solution with even numbers like 18-18-18, but that is hard to find unless one orders it. So I usually rely on Miracle Gro and during the winter, I use a 1/4 strenth solution with every other watering.
Time released fertilizers are not good for our purposes because it is not possible to determine when it has run out in these conditions. I don't like time released in general because plants have such a wide range of growth rates. Even if one didn't factor in the affect of weather on how often a plant gets watered, and thus the granules releasing fertilizer, how do they factor in the huge range of differences in growth rate?
I wouldn't want to find out my plants had run out of fertilizer sooner than anticipated by their sudden lack of growth or overall health. Because by then, you have lost weeks or maybe even months of potential.

GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 3, 2010
12:30 PM

Post #7422415

Thanks PC!
Good input on the fertilizer. I don't use the time release for anything else than my annual baskets like lobelia petunias and such. I use the Miracle grow most of the time for the feedings.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 14, 2010
7:47 PM

Post #7461874

Here are Willowwind2's cuttings, now in their 11th week. I know they don't look much different, but remember, these ones are growing outdoors in the winter. If it is a sunny day, it might get up to the high 70's in there. But at night, the only source of warmth is a seed warming pad on the bottom shelf as insurance against freezing. If you have been tracking the thread on growing fuchsias indoors, you will note a huge difference in growth between the two! I am just thrilled that most everyone is alive and the tiny one even has an open blossom. Which is, much to my delight, is not the same as Lottie Hobby. Now I need to find out which one it is! The photo isn't very clear, but the flowers sepals and petals are two different colors.

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GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2010
2:07 PM

Post #7463936

Your little GH has worked out really well for you this winter. They all look so green and healthy and when the time comes for there move they will be instantly ready! I hope you find out the ID of that little one.

Well after our big freeze I noticed that F. Sharkie still had some life left in a few branches. So just after Christmas I did some cuttings and they are rooting. I seem to have the bug for trying cuttings late in the season. Just after I had them indoors for a week I noticed a serious infestation of aphids and sprayed them with Raid House and Garden spray and it took care of the problem.
Here is how they look today.

Thumbnail by GardenGuyKin
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GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2010
2:26 PM

Post #7463987

I forgot to add that I sprayed then allowed about 30 mins. time for the product to work. I then used a spray bottle with plain water to spray off dead aphids and the product.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 16, 2010
6:23 PM

Post #7467416

Those Sharkie's look like they recovered very well and will be ready to go outside as soon as it is safe! Yes, you have done very well with late winter cuttings. I have considered it a few times these last few weeks, but have told myself to just wait. All of the sunshine indoors is occupied and I don't want to move anyone out of it.
But last year I was able to start rooting cuttings outdoors by February, and that is just a few weeks away, I just have to be patient... I have about 12 varieties which didn't get big enough to make cuttings from before winter set in, and I am anxious to get at least a couple off of each plant as soon as I can. One never knows when something is going to happen to one specimen and it is good to have back ups. My Pink Pearl and Mood Indigo's are both examples of this!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 12, 2010
8:46 PM

Post #7625042

Hey GGKin, how are your cuttings doing?
skellogg
Sundance, WY
(Zone 3b)

May 1, 2010
10:08 PM

Post #7756105

Just found this thread, and am delighted to get this info. I am in a much colder climate than you, and have tried wintering my pots for the last 2 winters now. The first time, I had absolutely no luck, and none of my plants made it. I tried it again this last winter, and to my surprise, I do have 3 or 4 that are now putting on new leaves. So glad that I can try to take cuttings and see if they take! Do you know, does this work with the fuschias that are not necessarily hardy? I am not sure if mine are hardy or not, as here, they still would not be hardy enough to winter in the ground.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 3, 2010
9:19 PM

Post #7762226

Wow, zone 3b! I have family in Laramie Wyoming. Do you know the names of your fuchsias? And yes, you can make cuttings of any fuchsia, hardy or not. I have learned a lot from reading in the forum here also. Before this winter, I'd of declared it impossible to grow them indoors at all. But I did it myself this winter in a sunny southern facing window and they did great, they even bloomed. So now I am keeping a couple of the smaller and slower growing varieties indoors as blooming houseplants permanently. I hope you post photos of your fuchsias here.
skellogg
Sundance, WY
(Zone 3b)

May 3, 2010
10:34 PM

Post #7762291

I really don't know which ones they are, as they don't tell us much here where I got them. She had 3 kinds, or rather, 3 different names. Dark Eyes, Swingtime, and I dont remember the third. I had them all in seperate pots, but over the winter, some of them did not make it, and DH repotted them into 2 pots, and didn't keep them seperate, so I don't know what lived and didn't, until they bloom. LOL! Frankly, I really didn't expect any to live, as I haven't ever been able to keep them alive inside, especially for that long. Last fall, our first hard freeze was in August!! Way too early. And we are still having freezes now.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2010
9:19 AM

Post #7967791

Willowwind2, I still haven't identified one of the fuchsias you sent me! I don't think it is one of the magellanicas, because the leaves are so small. But it also isn't one of the Encliandra's! Here are a couple of recent photos in the hope that someone out there can tell me it's real name. For now, it is still "Willowwind2!"
I tried to focus on the ball shape of the red flower buds before they open. So nice and round, not like a magellanica at all.

This message was edited Jul 14, 2010 8:21 AM

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2010
9:20 AM

Post #7967796

And another shot with more foliage.

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Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 14, 2010
9:58 AM

Post #7967897

That's looking good. Happy it did well for you. Mine has made a full recovery from its winter disaster.

Thumbnail by Willowwind2
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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2010
4:31 PM

Post #7968849

Very nice! I am going to send a photo to the American Fuchsia Society to see if they can id it for us ;-D

Willowwind2, I think your photo is of your F. magellanica and it certainly looks like it recovered very well! The other fuchsia has much smaller and thinner leaves. How is that one doing?

This message was edited Jul 15, 2010 7:41 AM

GardenGuyKin

GardenGuyKin
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2010
3:22 AM

Post #7969787

I'm wondering if it possibly could be 'Vielliebechen'

Tube and sepals red. Corolla purple.
Single Upright HWP
Garden or Container
Vielliebechen
(18"-4 ft) Common Hybrid
http://www.nwfuchsiasociety.com/hardies/hardies_v-y.htm

Willow and Pedrick
Your Fuchsias are looking fantastic! My poor fuchsias have sunburn spots on many of the buds from the heat spell we had. Here is a close up of Vielliebechen taken back in June first blooms to open of the year.

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PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 15, 2010
8:37 AM

Post #7970316

Beautiful little fuchsia GGK, and the fruiting portion of the blossom is distinctive in it's early purple pigmentation instead of the normal red or green. Willowwind2's doesn't have that. And the unopened flower buds on hers are so very round. It has a very definate upward growth pattern with tiny little leaves. As small as the Encliandra's but not shaped like them at all.
We had a bit of a heat wave up here also! And some of the newer additions to my collection got sunburned on their leaves and buds also, as they had been grown in a shadier location and hadn't adapted yet.
But we know they'll recover and produce plenty of new blossoms!
It is going to be hot again here today, I'd better get outside and water!
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 15, 2010
4:54 PM

Post #7971222

Both of my other ones are doing fine. The mini one isn't blooming yet but has healthy foliage and growth. The paler leafed one is finally growing and the deer topped it yesterday. No blooms on it either.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 17, 2010
2:42 PM

Post #7976111

I wrote to Salli Dahl of the Northwest Fuchsia Society and she thinks the fuchsia in question could be F. campos-portoi or a hybrid derived from it. And I think she is right.
I went to the website for the Fuchsia Research Institute and the photo they have for F. campos-portoi comes closer than anything else I've seen. She is going to verify this for me and let me know.
I should check to make sure there is a link to that institute in the sticky's!
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 18, 2010
12:12 PM

Post #7978248

Willowwind2, I heard back from Salli of the Northwest Fuchsia Society. She and I would really appreciate it if you could get a photo of the parent plant you have growing in your yard from which you sent the cuttings to me. Here is another photo of it. We are wondering how tall it gets. She said that F. campos-portoi hybridizes freely and has practically become a pest in some areas of northern California. I had to laugh at that! Imagining an invasive form of fuchsia never occurred to me! True F. campos-portoi has a bit thinner (as in width) than yours does. But it is certainly close!

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Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 18, 2010
3:41 PM

Post #7978792

That doesn't look like anything I have growing. The condition the plant I sent is in, is not good enough for a photo. Is it possible you are working with one I didn't send to you. I don't recall those little round buds but they sure are cute.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 18, 2010
6:03 PM

Post #7979186

Yup, you sent me three kinds of cuttings. One was F. magellanica, one was F. microphylla, and this was the third one. I have it growing out in the full sun and it is heading straight for the sky even faster and straighter than the F. magellanica I have right next to it. So I hope yours improves enough for a photo soon!
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 19, 2010
6:20 PM

Post #7981856

I have mine planted in almost full shade. I worked in the bed the other day and made it deer proof. I will move it to a sunnier spot in the fall. It has put up several new starts.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 19, 2010
7:45 PM

Post #7982065

I heard from the Northwest Fuchsia Society today and Salli Dahl confirmed it is a F. campos-portoi hybrid. I am very happy to hear that. I think it is one cool fuchsia! And I'll be looking forward to seeing the parent plant here someday.
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 20, 2010
10:21 AM

Post #7983449

Thanks for all your work on that. I'll get a picture ASAP.
PNWMountainGirl
(Sharon)SouthPrairie, WA
(Zone 7a)

July 20, 2010
5:29 PM

Post #7984329

Willow, is that the hardy fuchsia that you shared when we visited your home earlier this year? If so, I have a nice healthy start of it too.
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 20, 2010
6:41 PM

Post #7984503

No this was another one that was on the golf course side. When I was pruning the one I shared with you, I stuck a few pieces into the ground again, in May I think, and they all grew and are blooming. Six to twelve inches tall. That one is so easy to root.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 20, 2010
11:13 PM

Post #7985002

I think the hummingbirds are going to crazy over this one if it gets as tall as my magellanicas and lycioides. It has so many red flowers, I can't wait to see. I need a good video camera so I can take some footage of the territorial battles that go on in the evening when they are competing over who gets the last sip from the lycioides and it's masses of little red flowers. I've even begun another hedge with the lycioides this time instead of the magellanica molinae. This time I am going to espalier along the chain link fence on the hillside.
Willowwind2
Union, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 21, 2010
3:31 PM

Post #7986620

Espalier should be beautiful. Shouldn't have to wait to long for it to be all filled in, the speed it grows.
PedricksCorner
Freedom, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 29, 2010
7:47 PM

Post #8184301

GGKin, I just finished laying down a 30 foot brick walkway to prevent myself from falling on the slippery clay slope after the rains. Finally! Even the cats really like it :-)
When I stood at the top of the slope to view my work, I realized there stood Flash at the bottom next to my new shade room for making cuttings and transplanting seedlings. And I realized I should post a photo here of what has become of those wilted cuttings that arrived here in September of 2009 that I posted photos of in this thread.
My photography skills are still waiting for a better camera, ha, ha. But I hope you can see the big fuchsia at the end of the walk way. That is Flash in a 15 gallon pot! In bloom, but you can't see them well in this photo. He is almost to the top of the fence! A recent storm threatoned to knock some of the branches off, so I had just tied him up a bit. I considered moving him so the brick path would continue straight to my new work room, but then decided I like him there so much, the path can go around him!

This message was edited Oct 29, 2010 6:48 PM

This message was edited Oct 29, 2010 6:49 PM

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Other Fuchsias Threads you might be interested in:

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Amazing fuchsias Zanymuse 84 Sep 3, 2009 2:19 AM
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help with my fuchsia jjpate 2 Jun 8, 2009 5:38 AM
Fuschia - do I trim this? blackThumbz 15 Sep 4, 2009 4:03 PM


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