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Nasturtium seed pods

BEDFORDSHIRE, United Kingdom


Hi,
can anyone give me advice conserning my nastertiums. i had a magnificent display this year and have many many seed pods from them.
my question is: can i re-plant the seeds for next year?.
i live in England (south) in the uk. i have left the seed pods on the soil but i am not sure if i am doing the right thing.
advice greatly received.

South of Winnipeg, MB(Zone 3a)

I don't know what to advise for your climate, but yes, you could save and replant the seeds. Here, I would pick the seeds up and dry them well and then store till spring. They may not come back exactly like the parent plants, but if the seeds are good, you should get plants. Did you start these from seeds or buy them as plants? Nasturtium seeds aren't sown on the surface though. Whenever you plant them, they should be planted about 1/2" deep.

Sorry it took so long for you to get a reply.

Winchester, KY(Zone 6a)

I collected seed from mine last year, and had good results with the offspring this year. I found several ripe seeds laying on the ground, then was watchful to collect them as they ripened. When the seeds have turned from green to yellow-tan, they fall away from the plant easily, and are ready to collect. Some I gathered while still showing green shriveled up during the drying process. I planted them in different places this year, and had no reseeding where they grew last year. I have a feeling seed would easily rot during winter, so collecting and sowing again next year is a good idea.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

I'll keep my eyes open for pods this fall.

Winchester, KY(Zone 6a)

The seeds look like little brains to me, LOL. You'll see 1-3 of the "little brains" connected, and not really in a pod, but with a papery husk lightly covering them. The husk has naturally fallen away from most I find.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

So when neighbors ask what I'm doing I should reply, "Looking for brains"? I'll follow your directions, Neal. You can tell I trust you.

Winchester, KY(Zone 6a)

LOL...no one would be surprised to hear me say that, they all know I lost my own brain years ago!

Greensboro, NC(Zone 7a)

I collect my seed on a paper plate and let them cure/dry completely then store and label till the next spring. None of the seeds that fell off into the soil ever sprouted through self seeding so I wouldn't rely on that.

Rio Vista, CA

Quote from echoes :
I don't know what to advise for your climate, but yes, you could save and replant the seeds. Here, I would pick the seeds up and dry them well and then store till spring. They may not come back exactly like the parent plants, but if the seeds are good, you should get plants. Did you start these from seeds or buy them as plants? Nasturtium seeds aren't sown on the surface though. Whenever you plant them, they should be planted about 1/2" deep.

Sorry it took so long for you to get a reply.


I just picked some green nasturtium seed pods in a park I visited; can these be dried, and will the seeds be viable? Or do they need to dry completely on the plant?

Greensboro, NC(Zone 7a)

I always let mine dry on the plant. I've had that same situation with seed collecting away from home.
Give it a try is my best advice:) I would set them on a paper plate or in a shallow container in a warm dry location--for me that was on top of the TV or fridge--and let them turn tan. If the seeds inside have turned black then I would store them and try planting them next season. If they haven't then I wouldn't bother with them.

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