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Bromeliads: Aechmea Black Chantinii, Flowering already!

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Forum: BromeliadsReplies: 17, Views: 271
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edric
Oak Hill, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 26, 2009
9:28 PM

Post #7107210

noticed this yesterday, and it's got a pup coming up, Ed

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edric
Oak Hill, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 5, 2009
6:52 PM

Post #7137862

Today! Ed

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edric
Oak Hill, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 9, 2009
7:31 PM

Post #7152165

Oct. 9

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edric
Oak Hill, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 11, 2009
8:55 PM

Post #7158564

Today

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gardenpom
Melbourne, FL

October 22, 2009
11:17 AM

Post #7196417

That's a real beauty!

ridesredmule

ridesredmule
Barnesville (Charle, GA
(Zone 8b)

October 29, 2009
12:32 AM

Post #7218477

that is just Beautiful.
Love it!
Charleen
edric
Oak Hill, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 29, 2009
9:52 AM

Post #7219596

Thanks, Ed
plantsforpeg
Ventress, LA
(Zone 8b)

July 7, 2010
6:08 PM

Post #7951010

Do you have these for trade? I would like a pup.

ridesredmule

ridesredmule
Barnesville (Charle, GA
(Zone 8b)

July 8, 2010
4:37 AM

Post #7951810

that pup probably has a pup of it's own.
But isn't it a beautiful plant???
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 17, 2011
5:17 AM

Post #8932878

Am I correct in understanding that when these bloom, the plant will eventuallly die?
The reason it produced the pup or pups is for survival?
plantsforpeg
Ventress, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 17, 2011
6:11 AM

Post #8932906

Edric, glad to see another Brom collector. beautiful!
digital_dave
Springfield, MO
(Zone 6a)

December 19, 2011
8:41 AM

Post #8935447

Bromeliads are mostly "apical dominent." That is, the bud on the main growing stem of the plant secretes an auxin which inhibits the buds on the same stem from growing. Although many Bromeliads don't look like it, they all have a stem, it is often just rather compact.

When the terminal bud changes from "growing" to "blooming" mode, the remaining buds are free to grow and they become the pups, offsets, ... There are a few monocarpic Bromeliads (that do not pup) but it is the exception rather than the rule. There are also some that produce just a single pup right next to the blooming scape (Guzmania sanguinea, Vriesea splendens, among others). These are tricky to propagate - one must be patient and careful. (We call these "upper-puppers.")

There are also the opposite types, like Neoregelia Fireball and many Bilbergias that seem to branch freely. Vive la difference!

dave
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 19, 2011
9:13 AM

Post #8935497

Upper-puppers ~ cute! Would the Orthophytum be one of those? I've seen photos of those putting pups on the bloom stalk.
Then if I understand correctly, that type wouldn't die after blooming?

I am dabbling around the edges of Broms with a developing interest and believe I am doomed. But so much to learn. Thanks for sharing that information. Kristi
digital_dave
Springfield, MO
(Zone 6a)

December 19, 2011
5:46 PM

Post #8936194

Well, not really. If you've ever tried to take a pup from Vriesea splendens you would know just what I mean. The (almost always) lone pup comes up right in the middle and it's hard to get it apart without destroying the main plant. So, most people just leave them in place. After several generations though, the stem gets pretty gangly. If you are very careful and get just enough of the pup and the mother you can sometimes coerce additional pups.

There are really very few Bromeliads that die without pupping. I just think of the branch dying and being replaced by others. The most famous exception is the largest Bromeliad of all, the gigantic Puya raimondii from Peru and Bolivia.

I did have a georgeous Orthophytum naviodes that bloomed and died without pupping. I rather suspect it was just my non-ideal growing conditions (too cool in the Winter). All the other Orthophytums I grow branch freely.

dave
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 19, 2011
6:36 PM

Post #8936250

O.K. ~ I followed that description of the mother protecting her babe. Thanks for the explanation.

Again, if I can ask ~ how cool are the conditions your Bromelaids endure in winter?
digital_dave
Springfield, MO
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2012
9:05 PM

Post #8952342

We grow in a greenhouse with the approximate low setting of 54 degrees. It's about 20x30' facing south with two separate layers of poly. There are micro-climates inside that affect growth. The furnace end is a little warmer in the Winter; the air-inlet end is dryer in the Summer; the upper benches always warmer, etc. For most of them, 54 is sufficient but some of them aren't very happy.The warmer growers like the Brazilian Vrieseas seem to withstand colder temps than Vrieseas from Peru. Go figure.

Even though Bromeliads are mostly tropical, elevation plays a big part. High elevation dessert plants like Puyas (Peru, Bolivia) are frequently subjected to freezing temperatures and cope just fine. All things being equal, the temperature drops about 3.6 degrees for every 1,000 foot of elevation. So even at the equator it can be quite cool (like in Quito). It's often difficult to know what temperature a plant prefers. I just play around with the micro-climates in the greenhouse and the fussy ones just tend to slowly fade away and eventually die. They don't get replaced (well mostly...)

Dave

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 3, 2012
4:13 AM

Post #8952446

Very good ~ thank you. I was curious (knowing you get colder than us) how your Broms endured wintertime.

I've used a GH for 3 winters now and monitored the coolest temp end. I have noticed the microclimates in the GH. Mine is smaller ( yours appears huge) but I keep a thermometer on the heater end. Also one on the cool end that has a sensor that I can read in the house. That way I can see when I need to add wood to the heater.

I asked because I was not sure it this would be warm enough. While I was researching, I did find Brom survival rates by temperature but I know there are also variables. Again, thank you... Kristi

plantsforpeg
Ventress, LA
(Zone 8b)

January 3, 2012
12:30 PM

Post #8952974

I too am nursing about 5 of my Broms that don't like winter even in a GH. I am constantly moving things around until I find a spot that seems to work.

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Other Bromeliads Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
bromeliads ..how to propogate????? pixiedust 11 Jan 10, 2009 5:14 AM
Aechmea Blue Tango giancarlo 16 Feb 4, 2008 7:24 AM
My cryptanthus collection Chris_Lorry 30 Mar 2, 2009 12:43 PM
Growing a pineapple from the store. mikekilhoffer 20 Feb 18, 2009 7:49 PM
Looking to trade for colorful Bromeliads and similar plants. bwilliams 10 Jan 14, 2008 9:03 PM


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