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Garden Hortiscopes & History: herbs meanings

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Forum: Garden Hortiscopes & HistoryReplies: 12, Views: 141
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Kylaluaz

Kylaluaz
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 11, 2009
3:59 AM

Post #7156807

Nice to see the significance of Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme, from the folksong... I had always known they must have meanings but never searched out what they were. Really nice to know. No longer have my old herbals that would have told me that stuff, either. Interesting that Parsley is for bitterness... hmm.

thanks!
Kyla

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


October 11, 2009
1:55 PM

Post #7157375

I thought it was quite interesting as well. Did you know that there was an actual Scarborough Fair? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarborough_Fair

Kylaluaz

Kylaluaz
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 11, 2009
10:05 PM

Post #7158783

Thanks for the link. I did not know that but it doesn't surprise me. Reading the article though reminds me that I had known or heard of that earlier version of the song... the Elfin Bride.

"Sober and grave grows merry with time."

nice. very nice.

thanks again,
Kyla

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


October 12, 2009
2:02 PM

Post #7160844

Apparently the song has dozens of verses and interpretations from what I can gather.

I thought the history tidbit was a fun addition to break up the dead botanist list.

Got a neat hummingbird note coming up later this month (not a song) so stay tuned.

Kylaluaz

Kylaluaz
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 13, 2009
1:35 AM

Post #7163182

I shall!

Yes, the dread dead botanist list does get kind of repetitive, but then, it is still interesting to learn bits about those who prepared the way for what we can do and know now... I remember reading one time about when houseplants were introduced as a concept (to the Western world that is; in Japan of course bonsai are quite old tho not as ancient as some would think) -- and being surprised that no one had ever thought of it before whatever era that was, maybe early 1900s or even later, people started bringing stuff to the US from Brazil, women started sharing "slips" which is another word for cuttings I think -- can't remember now where I read about all that.

Good thing I am not the historian around here. ;-)
ZoarGardener
Bolivar, OH

October 17, 2009
12:53 PM

Post #7178840

Interestingly, plants have been imported from South America since the 1500's. The earliest reference that I have found indicates that Mirabilis jalapa made its way from its native Peru to Europe sometime in the 16th century. Thank God for explorers and botanists! ;-) Our plant selection would be significantly reduced were it not for them.

Kylaluaz

Kylaluaz
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 17, 2009
7:57 PM

Post #7179899

Yes, but they didn't pot them and put them around their house til later, I believe.

But I am sure you are correct. As I said, no historian here. ;-)

Kylaluaz

Kylaluaz
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

November 2, 2009
6:20 AM

Post #7232596

Welp. Guess I missed the "neat hummingbird note", must've been one day I did not look... Guess there is no archive? I was looking forward to that, but it has been a way busy time, so, musta missed it. :-(

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


November 2, 2009
1:16 PM

Post #7233020

10-21-1492...Christopher Columbus wrote in his log "little birds...so different from our own, it is a marvel" in his first European description of a hummingbird.


It will be back next year on that date.

Kylaluaz

Kylaluaz
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

November 2, 2009
4:23 PM

Post #7233601

Awwwww... Thank you, Melody!

they are indeed a marvel. ;-)

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


November 2, 2009
4:33 PM

Post #7233628

:o)
chin123
LUNAS
Malaysia

June 27, 2010
4:37 AM

Post #7924147

Can anyone let me know fingerroot in bahasa Melayu,

Thanks

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


June 27, 2010
7:08 AM

Post #7924471


Here is what one website has to say about it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uvaria_chamae

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Other Garden Hortiscopes & History Threads you might be interested in:

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