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Canning, Freezing and Drying: applebutter

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Catbird423

Catbird423
Odenton, MD
(Zone 7b)

November 2, 2009
5:38 PM

Post #7233883

I made applebutter in the slow cooker this weekend. While it was still hot I put it into sterilized jars, put on lids and rings. As it cooled the center of the lid went down (vacumm seal?) My question is are these jars sealed or should I keep them in the fridge or freezer? My grandmother made applebutter when I was a child, hers was so so good.
daugenet
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

November 2, 2009
5:56 PM

Post #7233949

When I made my apple butter I made sure to process it in a boiling water bath (BWB)

I would reprocess the apple butter, add a little lemon juice, use a new lid, and put it in a BWB according to your elevation (which appears to be below 1k feet so it would be 10 min)

If you think you will eat them soon enough the fridge would be fine. I am not familiar with its ability to be frozen but seeing as it is really close to apple sauce I would think you would be fine. Make sure you have freezer safe jars!
Carolinorygun
St. Helens, OR
(Zone 8b)

November 2, 2009
6:59 PM

Post #7234189

Although the center of the lid went down, this kind of open kettle canning doesn't create a strong vacuum; there is still unexpelled air in the jar. It's also possible without heat processing that certain bacteria (spoilage agents) will survive in the apple butter.

There's no particular health risk with what you did; apple butter is an acid product. But you risk wasting a lot of your hard work because the shelf life is reduced and the possibility of molds, etc. is higher. It's not fun to open a jar and smell mold.

daugenet's suggestions are good ones.

Carol

Catbird423

Catbird423
Odenton, MD
(Zone 7b)

November 2, 2009
7:49 PM

Post #7234338

Thank you folks so much! I think this batch will go into the freezer and the next into a water bath. I love applebutter!
patgeorge
Nurmo
Finland
(Zone 4b)

November 3, 2009
6:38 PM

Post #7237666

Perhaps I should ask this question in a different forum; but what is apple butter?
Pat
Carolinorygun
St. Helens, OR
(Zone 8b)

November 3, 2009
10:36 PM

Post #7238440

Apple butter is what in the UK would be referred to as a type of fruit cheese, though slightly less dense.

It's apple puree cooked down slowly with sugar and spices. Recipes vary widely.

For my recipe I use 2:1 apple puree to sugar (combining Caster and Demerara). Sugar is sometimes reduced depending upon sweetness of apples.

Spices I use are 4:2:1:1 cinnamon, mace, allspice, cloves. I use far less than many recipes. With long cooking the flavor intensifies and large amounts of spices can turn bitter. For 14 cups of puree I use as little as 1 teaspoon cinnamon and other spices in proportion.

I begin cooking on the stovetop and finish in the oven so as not to worry about spattering. For a more intense flavor and to prevent initial sticking I add a little cider or boiled cider.

When it's done the color will be dark and the puree can be mounded on a spoon with no liquid running out around the edges.

Apple butter is a wonderful accompaniment to pancakes or crepes.

Carol

daugenet
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

November 4, 2009
12:34 PM

Post #7239978

Its like apple sauce except a more condensed. If I had to call it by another name I would almost call it apple jam
patgeorge
Nurmo
Finland
(Zone 4b)

November 4, 2009
6:48 PM

Post #7241224

Thanks. Sounds delicious. I'll give it a go.

Pat
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2009
11:37 PM

Post #7245564

I use apple butter when I bake bread in the breadmaker. It retains the moisture in the bread. Fresh for a long time. I use it for French toast. It is wonderful.
patgeorge
Nurmo
Finland
(Zone 4b)

November 7, 2009
6:55 PM

Post #7250728

How do you use it in your breadmaker Jnette? Do you replace a part of the water?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 7, 2009
10:51 PM

Post #7251311

I have a recipe for applesauce bread. It calls for not only the applesauce but apple concentrate. Since I roast my applesauce on low for so many hours, (untimed) Just until it is the consistency I want, it is pretty thick. I replace the applesauce with the butter and then I use applebutter with water mixed to replace the concentrate. Lol, I'm sorry, no specific measurements. Just "by guess and by golly" as my grandpa used to say. And let me tell you, if he were alive today he would be pretty darned old, so you have probably never heard that saying.

patgeorge
Nurmo
Finland
(Zone 4b)

November 9, 2009
6:30 PM

Post #7256539

I've heard "by gosh and by golly" - but then I am 'pretty darned old'.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 9, 2009
10:37 PM

Post #7257285

In FINLAND yet!! That makes me feel like a world traveler. LOL

Jeanette

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