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Article: Garbage Gardening: Grow a Pineapple Fruit Tree Plant!: different varieties

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Forum: Article: Garbage Gardening: Grow a Pineapple Fruit Tree Plant!Replies: 3, Views: 18
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stellamarina
Laie, HI

November 4, 2009
1:27 AM

Post #7238995

A recent happening in Hawaii has been the new varieties of pineapple coming on to the market in last few years. Now pinapples grown in Hawaii are only for table and not for caning so there is less need for a high acid fruit. The new varieties coming out are a lot sweeter. From my own experience, I find that pinapples that have not been kept in the fridge are easier to root. I also have ended up growing them in a large tub with lots of old wood chip mulch in the soil...seems to work better than when I grow them in our local sandy soil. Maybe it is just that I know I have to tend to their needs more in a container. The type I grow has small fruit and has white flesh. It is very low acid and is very sweet. My favorite pinapples are the type they have in Samoa. Can get very big and are supper sweet and have red leaves. Aloha
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

November 4, 2009
4:43 PM

Post #7240714

Thanks for your comments, stellamarina! It is interesting to know that Hawaii will now be growing pineapples only for fresh consumption rather than canning. I have noticed in the pineapples that I have grown that the sugar content outweighs the acid content. Pineapples grown at home always seem much sweeter and more delicious that store-bought pineapple fruit and certainly far superior in taste as compared to canned pineapple.

I have a red-leaved pineapple that I got in a Dave's Garden plant swap a few years ago. I haven't yet checked to see what species it may be. I'm still waiting to see what the fruit will be like from the red pineapple (photo attached). We had an especially cold winter here last year (sustained temperatures in the low 20s F for several hours on several nights), so all my pineapple plants got knocked back some by the cold weather, but most of them have bounced back nicely and are growing strong.

Edited to add: It is also interesting that you have found that cooling the pineapple fruit in the refrigerator will help the bromeliad crown to root when planted. I know that tropical orchids tend to flower better whenever they have a brief period of temperatures in the 40s F, and it may be that the cooling of the bromeliad crown to the high 30s/low 40s F temperatures of a typical refrigerator may also inspire the bromeliad to more vigorous growth and earlier flowering.

Jeremy

This message was edited Nov 4, 2009 11:46 AM

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stellamarina
Laie, HI

November 5, 2009
12:05 AM

Post #7242160

Will be interesting to see what kind of fruit your red leaf pinapple has. Please note that my add on actually said it is is better Not to put the pineapples in the fridge. :o) just to make sure that you are not getting the wrong idea there. A further note about pineapple growing here in Hawaii. Last night on the news they announced that the Maui Pineapple plantation that has been selling the very sweet Maui Gold table variety is going broke and closing. Too much competition from other countries, the econonmy and the dollar exchange rate to blame. Sad and a sign of the times. I does mean though that small family farms might want to get into the business though. They would not have the big overhead of huge equipment etc. and could just sell locally. Aloha
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

November 5, 2009
1:45 PM

Post #7243695

Thanks for the clarification on the fridge cooling, Stella. I read that one wrong. It is distressing that so many businesses are failing during this current economic crunch. I see it happening even in our own neighborhood where businesses that have been operating for decades can't make enough profit to keep going. It is very sad.

Jeremy

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