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Winter Sowing: Wintersowing 2009-2010

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Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 6, 2009
5:46 PM

Post #7247744

We came from here:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/969592/

Come join us for chatting and efforts at wintersowing this season!

This message was edited Nov 6, 2009 12:47 PM

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 6, 2009
5:57 PM

Post #7247769

super... thanks...
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 10, 2009
10:34 PM

Post #7261066

I'm new to DG, do I start watching this one now and un-watch the other?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 10, 2009
11:04 PM

Post #7261145

either or, hansey... sometimes when we 'move on' to another thread, the other one does not get any more replies,... but sometimes it does.

I rarely unwatch a thread... just in case a question is asked in that thread which i can answer.

Ive been getting my seeds ready, and soon, hopefully I will be making my list of what i really want to sow this winter.

My neighbor, after me doing this for 3 yrs, said she is finally going to WS this year. She asked me about a month ago if I keep the containers in my house... [she does not venture out much in the winter, so i guess she never saw my containers til early spring]

anyhoo... i was like... are you nuts? I said, nope, just stick them out in the snow. So, now she is determined to save her DH some cash for next year and sow all the plants instead of buy them.

I will tell her to invite me over so i can show her how... though i have given her enough containers of plants over the years, she should be able to figure it all out.
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 11, 2009
2:25 PM

Post #7263058

Hansey, what Karen said. There's a lot of information on the other thread which will be helpful to you as you do your winter sowing, so please refer to it often. You'll have questions and it's probably one that's been asked before. Remember: there are no stupid questions.

Having had the success of my first winter sowing last year, I am thrilled with this method. I bought very few new plants this year (if you don't count bulbs!) and that was a good thing. It also kept me from haunting my garden centers as in the past where temptation lay around every corner. So I can assure you this method works. You will have doubt as the winter progresses and things are covered with snow and ice, but hang in there!
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2009
9:03 PM

Post #7264527

I buy very few things these days, too. Where would I put them?

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 11, 2009
9:39 PM

Post #7264642

Karen-- what's the tall purple flower?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2009
9:43 PM

Post #7264653

Larkspur, all volunteers. I have thousands out there now growing for next year.

Karen

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 11, 2009
9:46 PM

Post #7264664

Very pretty as usual. Are those your Yvonne's in the background, against the fence?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2009
9:56 PM

Post #7264694

Yes, Terese, those were my Yvonne's in June. I started the seeds inside last year, but they didn't get much bigger than the ones I wintersowed in previous years, about 50 inches. Maybe it was because the summer was so cool and cloudy last year. But I suspect that it would take some hi-test ferts to get them really big, and I don't use those strong chemicals. I try to stick pretty much to organic stuff.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2009
9:59 PM

Post #7264700

Other side, August. They were a little bigger before the frost killed them off, but I don't have a pic.

K.

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 11, 2009
10:01 PM

Post #7264708

Very nice and full... mine were scraggly. I posted a photo in the Salvia forum, and someone mentioned what nutrients i'm probably missing. The soil around my house is basically crap.
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 12, 2009
3:20 AM

Post #7265751

Oh, you have some of that, too, tcs? I thought I had the crappiest soil on earth. True story: several years ago, at least 7, we bought a dump-truck load of compost. Oh, it looked so good, black gold, nice and fine. I don't know what that stuff was, but it surely wasn't compost. It is still sitting as a layer in the soil where we placed it, not even breaking down and being absorbed into the soil. Methinks it must have been ground up asphalt. By now, it should have degraded and melded into the rest of the dirt. What a rip. You can't always tell unless you do it yourself.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 12, 2009
3:26 AM

Post #7265772

we are a relatively new subdivision... developed starting in 2001... where they scrape away all the good black dirt and all that is left behind is clay.

then when they put down the sod... they said there were be 3" of top soil... we were lucky to get an inch. It was amazing the crap that was buried under the sod, rocks [BIG rock] sticks, branches... they did a terrible job.. it's amazing our grass even grew.

most of the flower beds that i tend to is way behind my home, that was old corn fields... the State owns it.. but i beautify it.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 12, 2009
10:24 AM

Post #7266266

I'm convinced that the answer to improving soil is additions of compost and other organic matter every year. In recent years I have mulched all my planting beds with shredded leaves, but haven't found time for that yet this year. I'm not certain that I'll get to it at all, the weather is getting too cold for my liking. I even have enough leaves gathered, just haven't done it yet. I just finished yanking annuals and cutting back perennials this week.

Karen
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 12, 2009
12:47 PM

Post #7266382

I agree wholeheartedly with you, Karen. That was my goal in having that load of compost brought in. I've been using pinebark mulch lately and love that stuff. Man, is it good!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 12, 2009
1:02 PM

Post #7266407

My neighbor keeps saying she wants to bring in some horse manure... but is afraid it will tick off all the other neighbors. I know she'll never do it. for whatever reason, he DH gets pisses that she spends so much time working in the yard.

What i keep saying that i need to do... is get rid of those huge bark chips... they've been breaking down... but i need to fill in the beds with soil the do some sort of a compost.

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2009
5:08 PM

Post #7267169

tcs, have you ever looked into lasagna gardening? I bet that would be ideal for your conditions. I just learned about it, and did a huge new bed that way--you just put down cardboard or thick layer of newspaper on top of the grass or weeds or whatever is currently in the area, then layer on organic materials on top of it--leaves, grass clippings, peat, kitchen scraps, top soil, whatever you have lots of! If you do it in the fall, you'll have a wonderful bed ready for planting in the spring. I did it mid-summer, and was able to plant in it 2 weeks later. It's the nicest, most weed-free bed I have! Trying something similar in my veggie garden this fall--covered it with a thick layer of mulched leaves, then laid down big pieces of cardboard that I rescued from behind the dumpster at school. Maybe in the spring it will be enriched, and much more weed-free than usual!

Angie

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 12, 2009
10:46 PM

Post #7268222

Angie... yes, i read about it a few yrs ago on here.. and have done small areas out back. I take my broken down card board boxes that i use for winter sowing and in teh fall, lay them down with grass clipping on top... the area i did last year worked out well... it it now a small flower bed.


But i should probably do small areas around my house to improve those beds.

thanks for the input though... sometimes the easiest solutions slip your mind.

Terese
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 12, 2009
11:10 PM

Post #7268273

Terese: I use the small pine bark mulch, not those big nuggets. Those things won't be broken down in my lifetime!

I just gotta try that lasagna gardening technique. Have lots of cardboard, too.

Other Angie
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 12, 2009
11:43 PM

Post #7268394

Agreed, lasagna gardens are great. I actually prefer interbay mulch beds, which is basically the same but covering the top of the hump with burlap. Now, I use old bedsheets instead of the burlap, works just as well.

Karen
LynnPhillips
Buckley, WA
(Zone 7b)

November 13, 2009
3:30 AM

Post #7269056

Bedsheets? Tell me more.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 13, 2009
11:56 AM

Post #7269568

Lynn: I've done basic lasagna gardens as well as interbay mulch beds and I find that interbay mulch does break down much faster. The first time I actually bought burlap to use and it worked very well. Then, that genius that is my husband threw it in the garbage... When I wanted to repeat the performance I wasn't going to buy burlap again.

I had to improvise. I keep several old bedsheets, matress covers, and blankets strictly for garden use, so I have used them for interbay mulch beds and they seem to work well for me. Since sheets are old, worn, and thin, they probably don't hold as much moisture as a heavy burlap would but I do give those areas a shower with the hose or sprinkler every few days when the weather is dry. And they do keep the hump materials dark too, and are breathable to allow for oxygen.

Karen
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 13, 2009
12:14 PM

Post #7269589

Interesting use of bed linens, Karen, and one I can adapt with some really thin sheets I bought at a "deal," which turned out to be no deal at all except for the vendor.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 13, 2009
2:36 PM

Post #7269974

I missed reading this thread for a few days, wow, did I miss a lot! LOL, it's a great thread.

We have crappy soil here - clay - in fact, I could make fine pottery out of it it's so awful. Went to Iowa a couple weeks ago where I keep my mother-in-law's garden up (she passed away) and I wanted to CRY as the soil was so black, rich, amazing! I couldn't believe how easy gardening would be with real soil and NOT clay!!!!

This'll be my first year to w.s. - can't wait. I have a room full of milk cartons.
Cynthia

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 13, 2009
2:49 PM

Post #7270016

>>and one I can adapt with some really thin sheets I bought at a "deal," which turned out to be no deal at all except for the vendor.

LOL -- been there, done that!!

did a quick google and found this blog...
http://composteasy.blogspot.com/2008/07/interbay-mulch.html

super idea Karen... thanks for mentioning it.

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 13, 2009
4:41 PM

Post #7270310

Wow, thanks for the great link (and all the ones listed at the end of that one--I ended up following quite a few!). It gives me some ideas on how to improve the technique I am just tinkering with! I wonder where I could get some burlap cheap. Looking to cover about 400 sq. feet of veggie garden! Or do you just build it into "humps" here and there around the garden, instead of covering the entire space? I was hoping to do a double-whammy of preventing weeds and improving the soil.

Angie
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 14, 2009
2:20 AM

Post #7272061

That IS a great link and one I've added to my favs. Thanks tons! And guess what? I just found an excellent source of clean, aged composted horse manure nearby! {{~~~~}} doing the happy dance!!

Other Angie

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 15, 2009
4:59 AM

Post #7275418

My BIL has a wealth of aged horse manure, but I have no way to transport it between his house and mine. Somehow just not keen on the idea of loading buckets of it into my minivan, and enduring the stench for a couple of hours on the way home. :) And for some reason, he is not keen on the idea of shoveling it into his pickup and driving it all the way over here. He's said I'm welcome to it if I'll come get it. Oh, well. Maybe I'll find a closer source. LOL

Angie

gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 15, 2009
12:43 PM

Post #7275788

If the manure is well aged, it shouldn't stink- it should just smell earthy.
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 15, 2009
1:53 PM

Post #7275863

Now I only have to persuade DH or some unsuspecting strong young man to go help me load it and then unload it!

Other Angie

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 15, 2009
3:07 PM

Post #7276068

gemini_sage

I was going to make the same statement, earthy, and I think green manure isn't bad...LOL

Now a buck (male goat) is for sure one thing that is rough to deal with the smell in a van, especially for two days (don't ask me how I know that...LOL)

If I had the opportunity at aged horse manure, man you couldn't keep me away...

Janet

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 15, 2009
4:59 PM

Post #7276377

I've started to collect a few jugs, here and there... Dont want Dh getting ticked that they are collecting in the kitchen so soon... so i bagged them up, took them in the basement - and put them in a far corner... i looked over and saw a huge trash bag that was full of something -- and low and behold... it was full of milk jugs!! jack pot!! i've got a huge jump on next year. [probably 10-15 containers]

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 15, 2009
11:33 PM

Post #7277396

Since it is all my DH and I can do to drink enough milk for the jugs, I send an e-mail out to all of the membership in my garden club and ask them to save theirs and bring to our meeting, well last week I received 30 jugs, not bad for a start. now all I need is 170 more...LOL

Janet
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 17, 2009
4:47 PM

Post #7282739

Oh my gosh, only 200 jugs Janet? Let's go double, ha!
Cynthia

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 17, 2009
11:18 PM

Post #7283995

Well, my ante just got upped! My DNeice has asked me to help landscape her new home! Does she know I've only grown veggies???!!!!

So, guess who's gonna be collecting a LOT of milk jugs between now and December?

I've got dibs on both my nearby Starbuck's, and picked up jugs last night. I'll be sowing flower seeds for my niece, myself, and my neighbor. I AM my neighbor's keeper!

P.S. I am DEFINITELY gonna need ya'lls help with flowers for a front yard! Thanks in advance!! ^^_^^_^^_^^_^^

Linda
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 18, 2009
4:02 AM

Post #7285045

Starbuck's? What did I miss? Can you get jugs from them?
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 18, 2009
9:07 PM

Post #7287200

Linda, ya know wintersowing is great for most tree and shrub seeds. That could come in handy with your landscape job :-)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 19, 2009
4:09 AM

Post #7288560

G_S! PLEASE tell me more! She only has 1 tree on 1-1/2 acres. I truly don't know plants and flowers like I've learned veggies. I did stop today 2 take a picture of a shrub on someone's curb. I figured I need 2 start identifying plants that catch my eye so I'll know which seeds 2 WS! I've asked my niece 2 go thru some magazine's 2 select landscapes that appeal 2 her. We might also need 2 ride thru some Houston 'hoods 2 get some ideas. Thanks again. Here's the pic from today. I think its some kind of azalea.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
11:23 AM

Post #7289067

I've tried maybe a dozen or so woody plants with wintersowing and its worked well. The specific plants would differ for our zones, but most seed producing woody plants you see growing in your area would be worthwhile possibilities. I started Caryopteris and Vitex last year, and the Vitex even bloomed the first year!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 19, 2009
11:29 AM

Post #7289071

[quote]Starbuck's? What did I miss? Can you get jugs from them?
[/quote]

Yes, you can ask them to save milk jugs too... ya figure, they go thru a lot of milk.
My son - who works there - will just put them all in a huge trash bag and bring them home.
I'd think if you called in the Am and said you'd pick them up later... or ask when the best time to pick them up... in the evening, before they close up.. they prep for the next day, refilling all the containers with their milk. [skim,2%, whole]
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2009
1:23 PM

Post #7289238

Thanks tsc1366! I will do that as Missouri doesn't have recycling! And our church has a coffee shop, milk jugs, duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. I bet they'd love me picking them up every day.

With two friends winter sowing (I have thousands and thousands, I mean thousands of seeds) I need a ton of jugs to share!
Cyn
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 19, 2009
1:31 PM

Post #7289260

Hansey: Have you thought about daycares? I bet they have a gazillion jugs of milk and juice that they use every day!
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
1:35 PM

Post #7289270

Cyn, you could also collect the coffee grounds from the coffee shop- great compost and mulch! Our Starbucks here won't let us collect their grounds- that just seems stupid to me!
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 19, 2009
1:53 PM

Post #7289305

Neal: I'll bet it's fear that you're going to reuse them, set up your own coffee shop and compete with them!!! Maybe call it Starbucks Stops Here!
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
2:13 PM

Post #7289354

A recycled coffee shop, LOL!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 19, 2009
5:50 PM

Post #7289988

Desperate times call for "desperate" measures!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 19, 2009
7:52 PM

Post #7290322

>>Our Starbucks here won't let us collect their grounds- that just seems stupid to me!

Neil... i bet "corporate" would love to hear about that. I know Starbucks is very into 'recycling' of sorts... I'd drop them an email [at corporate] and mention that you want to use their old grounds, and they wont give them to you.

someone may get a slap on the wrist... but i'd bet you will get grounds out of the deal... if you dont want to do it... tell me which store # [location] it is.. .and i'll do it.

kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
8:13 PM

Post #7290364

Starbucks here doesn't (won't) save grounds, either. Not much of an issue for me, my neighborhood isn't classy enough that Starbucks would ever come to this part of town. But I do have a little local coffee shop a few blocks from my house that saves me all their grounds. I have a 5 gallon bucket of them in my garage to dump today.

Karen
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
9:43 PM

Post #7290611

That's a good idea Terese! I've read Starbucks is into being green and using earth friendly products, so I bet they would like to know that!

Karen, we're just lucky to have a Starbucks in town, it's in our Kroger grocery. Did they give you a reason for not saving them?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2009
9:55 PM

Post #7290649

No, just that they don't do it. I rarely get to a Starbucks anyway, so doesn't matter to me. I'm glad to have the little shop in the neighborhood saving them for me.

I just dumped a 5 gallon bucket of grounds into one of my bins. It's cold out there! 47 degrees now. One of my bins is 85 degrees, the other 95. Not terribly hot, but a whole lot warmer than air temp.

I really lose my enthusiasm for composting in winter. I did keep adding the grounds most of last winter but I'm not sure how long I'll keep it up this year. The older I get the less I like winter.

Karen
sissy70
Rushville, IN
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
6:23 AM

Post #7292005

im new at this where do you put the milk jugs after planting??????
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 20, 2009
1:00 PM

Post #7292299

Sissy: They go outside. Be sure to check out the wintersowing sticky at the top of this thread. It has lots of great info on this technique and it does work!

This message was edited Nov 20, 2009 8:01 AM
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 20, 2009
1:02 PM

Post #7292301

Here's my Gaillardia that I wintersowed last year:

Thumbnail by Hemophobic
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 20, 2009
1:04 PM

Post #7292305

Rudbeckia Irish Eyes also wintersowed:

Thumbnail by Hemophobic
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 20, 2009
1:06 PM

Post #7292307

Here's what my wintersowing jugs looked like over the winter:

This was early on as I started. Later I had LOTS more jugs!!

Thumbnail by Hemophobic
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
1:09 PM

Post #7292313

Sissy, that first year I tried it I worried myself sick over those poor jugs out there frozen solid, covered in snow and ice, but alas, they sprouted and grew beautifully with hardly any effort!
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

November 20, 2009
1:10 PM

Post #7292316

Neal's right, Sissy. You will be thinking that there's no way this will work, but it does!
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
1:19 PM

Post #7292332

Okay, stupid question ... on one WS thread, I read a gal's DH drilled holes in all her containers. They were beautiful containers - beautiful holes. I tried drilling through a milk jug - no way - do you have to actually puncture them with a nail first or what's the SECRET to getting a drill bit through plastic?

I'm totally non-tool ignorant, had to borrow the drill. Am I just drill challenged???
Cynthia

PS Our church's coffee shop is going to save their milk jugs for me so I have to get the 50 I already have cut and ready to go so I have more room. ~grin~
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
1:19 PM

Post #7292334

Starting seeds indoors has become such a pain for me, I'm pretty much wintersowing everything from now on. I used to be in such a hurry to get blooms I'd try to get an early start indoors with some things, but these days there's enough blooming to keep me happy in spring without the annuals. The annuals kick in later in the summer after my Lilies and early summer perennials are done, just when the color is needed.
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
1:24 PM

Post #7292355

Cynthia, I just use a knife. First I make 4 or 5 stabs in the bottom of the jug, and with each stab, I twist the knife to make a hole (and not just a slit that may not allow enough drainage). If you make the holes in the bottom first, the jug doesn't collapse as badly (as it does if you've already cut the jug partially in half). It's quick this way, and I go ahead and get a bunch ready beforehand.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
1:36 PM

Post #7292378

Thanks GeminiSage, I'll try that. The jugs with the drilled holes look so nice, but wow, what a pain it'll be since the drill bit won't go thru. I want to get the spare room cleaned out so I can make room for lots more!
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
2:39 PM

Post #7292533

I use a utility knife (box cutter) and just make triangular holes with 3 slits. Very quick and easy. I use a metal skewer (like for shishkebabs) to make 2 small holes ( one in top and one in bottom) to put twist-em through to keep top secure on bottom.
dennist
Marquez, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 20, 2009
2:42 PM

Post #7292541

Use a "brad point" drill bit to make the "beautiful" holes. I use a 3/16" bit on mine but, I suppose 1/4" would work...don't know for sure...newbie here.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
3:00 PM

Post #7292591

I'll google a brad point drill bit so I know what it looks like, LOL. I think I'll try the twist tie vs. the duct tape to hold the top down. Which one is easier in the long run? I don't mind spending the time now preparing the jugs.

Have you seen the winter sowing video on youtube? It's really good.
sissy70
Rushville, IN
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
3:09 PM

Post #7292619

hey guys i use a ice pick
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
3:22 PM

Post #7292648

Hey Sissy, do you cut your meat with an axe?
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
3:56 PM

Post #7292729

LOL, I want pretty holes in my milk jugs. ~grin~
sissy70
Rushville, IN
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
4:54 PM

Post #7292897

maybe and i eat it raw lol
violap
Fremont, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
5:17 PM

Post #7292946

I use an awl (like an ice pick) and heat it to push it through.
I like your idea of 2 small holes to keep the top and bottom together,Perennial
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
6:03 PM

Post #7293061

The 2 small holes with a twist tie is easier than duct tape for sure, but its not really necessary to secure them shut. I've found they keep the proper shape and shut just fine without securing. It's much better for me because I'm out there every day in early spring checking every jug- and I never can get away with doing fewer than 100, LOL
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
6:10 PM

Post #7293076

A woman after my own heart, LOL. I'm planning for 100 myself - keep one, give two away; keep one, give two away...
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
6:14 PM

Post #7293083

hehehehe...you mean "man after your own heart" LOL! Don't worry, I'm used to it- I have long hair and get mistaken for a lady from behind quite often.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
8:46 PM

Post #7293529

Woops, sorry! I assumed Gemini was a May birthday baby (like me) and Sage was probably the woman's first name. I like to try and figure out the DG names, really blew it with yours. Maybe we'll call you Mr. Gemini Sage, lol, and you can call me Mrs. Hansey Collie. (Han is my collie, duhhhh, way original in my name, not.) ~grins~
Cynthia

gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
9:43 PM

Post #7293659

Well half right aint bad, LOL. I'm a June Gemini, who just likes Sage plants :-)
Neal

This message was edited Nov 20, 2009 4:44 PM
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2009
9:53 PM

Post #7293690

Oh, that makes sense. I'm a May Gemini who likes way too many different types of plants, so I went with the dog.
:)
Cynthia

Thumbnail by hanseycollie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 20, 2009
10:00 PM

Post #7293711

quick little diddy on Starbucks... if they are in a store, like Dominicks or Krogers... or even hotels... they generally are not "Owned" by Starbucks. I know an "establishment' can pay a fee... like 15k a year... yes, HUGE money, to sell the starbucks products... even the employees are not actual Starbucks employees.

so -- that could be a reason why they would not 'recycle' the grounds.
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2009
10:01 PM

Post #7293715

I hear ya there! I don't know how I chose one plant, I never met a bloom I didn't like, LOL.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 20, 2009
10:06 PM

Post #7293729

I have to admit... i've met a plant or two i didnt like... one that jumps into my head was ... Oh geeze, of course i can not think of the name now... but it was very thistly, with white blooms... planted them with my tomatoes because i read they were 'good' for them... it'll come to me...

but i yanked them and i'm still getting volunteers.

borage officenalis

This message was edited Nov 20, 2009 4:08 PM

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 21, 2009
7:23 PM

Post #7296776

Cynthia and Gemini sage:

I'm working on almost 200 milk jugs for my first time... hate to think what that number will be after 2010 WS ...lol

Janet
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2009
4:55 AM

Post #7298609

Janet, did you see the photo above of Han and his brother Luke? Lukie came to play last weekend. It was fun - we had two others so four collies in the backyard. Will Dmail you soon!
Cynthia
antsinmypants
Marietta, MS
(Zone 7b)

December 8, 2009
1:43 AM

Post #7346956

I use a wood burning tool to cut the jugs in half & to make the holes in the bottom. Super fast & easy.

ants
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 10, 2009
1:45 AM

Post #7353872

if you are sowing a smaller amount of seeds, you can use plastic bags. i read it in the WS thread last year and it worked pretty well. Also, Dave did a video a few years ago about using newspaper as container and you can just plant that right into the ground. very cool.
bigred
Ashdown, AR
(Zone 8a)

December 10, 2009
12:03 PM

Post #7354681

Can I join in on this thread,please.

I hoping it warms up enough today so I can start WS my poppies,larkspurs and a few others. I'm using paper mache egg cartoons for the poppies,larkspurs and other that don't like root disturbance. They work just as well as peat pots for plants that don't need a long growing period and can be planted just like the peat pots.

Peggy...I get mistaken for a guy too because of the screen name.
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
12:17 PM

Post #7354705

The Starbucks in Nutley, NJ bags the grounds up in big bags to give away. He grabs them when takes his mother there, her favorite treat. I suspect that a worker at your Starbucks is a gardener!
sissy70
Rushville, IN
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2009
7:44 PM

Post #7356032

can anyone tell me what to ws in my zone thanks for any help

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 10, 2009
7:52 PM

Post #7356057

sissy... you really should have trouble winter sowing anything.

browse this site for more information.

http://wintersown.org/
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
8:57 PM

Post #7356301

Sissy, I think tcs meant you shouldn't have trouble winter sowing anything.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 10, 2009
8:58 PM

Post #7356304

LOL...thanks Neil... good catch.

sissy you would NOT have any troubles.
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
8:59 PM

Post #7356307

LOL
sissy70
Rushville, IN
(Zone 5b)

December 11, 2009
1:10 AM

Post #7357161

thank you guys sure have been a big help
sissy
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

December 11, 2009
2:19 AM

Post #7357447

Sissy: Also be sure to read the sticky notes at the top of this forum. Great information there for first timers, which is what I was last year. I love winter sowing! It really works.
dennist
Marquez, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 11, 2009
11:36 AM

Post #7358220

I'm ready...when do we start? :)

Thumbnail by dennist
Click the image for an enlarged view.

bigred
Ashdown, AR
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2009
11:43 AM

Post #7358230

dennist
Yesterday*S*...at least I did.
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

December 11, 2009
1:50 PM

Post #7358473

I'll be starting in Jan. Last year I started some in Dec. and it was too much to deal with until after Christmas, so I'm waiting 'til later this year. Think I'll try throwing a few Meconopsis directly on the ground where they're to grow and see how they do. I tried WSing them last year. They sprouted but then fizzled out. I think I didn't get them transplanted quickly enough and they got too hot. Also going to do some larkspur like this.
bigred
Ashdown, AR
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2009
2:09 PM

Post #7358509

I'd loved to do the blue poppies but it gets hot to soon for them here. Tried seeds once ...nothing.
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
2:16 PM

Post #7358527

I tried Meconopsis a couple of times, but I'm thinking we southerners may have to content ourselves with the gorgeous pics from northern gardens. Its one of the few plants that makes me envy colder regions, LOL.
violap
Fremont, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 11, 2009
4:32 PM

Post #7358871

Sissy, I live in the same zone as you and also have a lot of questions.

One I have is when to do it? I'm thinking in February ,especially for hardy annuals.But should I do perennials sooner?Is this even right for annuals?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 11, 2009
4:38 PM

Post #7358886

Viola... you and I are almost in the same zone. Perennials you can do anytime - after the holidays. I do mine Mid-Jan to Mid-Feb... or when ever i have time.

tenders a bit later than that. March or so.
I've done hardy annuals in Feb... some got 'nipped' one year when we had warmer weather then a month later we had a hard frost in April. so you have to be careful ...i just covered them with a heavy blanket to protect the seedlings.
violap
Fremont, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 11, 2009
5:08 PM

Post #7358976

the annuals would be things like snapdragons, zinnias?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 11, 2009
5:15 PM

Post #7358999

yes... marigolds, cosmos too. Cosmos were some of the babies i lost that frost we had. OH and morning glories.. but i had so many of those, that losing a few didnt effect me.

I haven't gotten to the point where i divide my tender annuals and hardy annuals... I dont think i'm that knowledgeable yet. I just treat the Perennials and annuals as such.. and do the annuals later.
violap
Fremont, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 11, 2009
5:26 PM

Post #7359044

Would sweet peas benefit from being winter sown or would they do better just sown where they are to grow?
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 12, 2009
10:52 AM

Post #7361094

I am collecting soda bottles and asked the neighbor to save soda bottles and milk jugs. I have been baking batches of potting soil after my cookies - odd but energy efficient-and filling my containers. Got my paint pens and seeds at the ready! Time will tell come spring!
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 12, 2009
12:41 PM

Post #7361193

I sow hardy perennials and hardy annuals in winter. Many HAs like poppies, larkspur, and bachelor volunteers sprout in my flower beds and stay green all winter, unfazed by winter weather, even below zero temps. My beds are now covered in larkspur and nigella seedlings, an inch tall, though we had 15 degrees this week.

Snaps are another that are very cold tolerant for me. Most last several years for me, overwintering with no protection. If sowing in a jug, I do those in winter.

Karen
muckboot
Wadsworth, OH

December 14, 2009
12:50 PM

Post #7367183

Reading back in this thread several posts mentioned bad soil in their beds and around their houses. If you have hard clay type soil, try mixing in some washed mason sand, You can get it at a building supply yard. A place that sells sand and gravel. make sure that it's washed, otherwise it has too much salt in it, that's bad for your plants. It's cheap, too. usually about 22.00/ton. I have use it for years in my vegetable gardens and flower beds. Mix in organic matter as it's available and soon you'll have beautiful soil.
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

December 14, 2009
1:08 PM

Post #7367212

Muck: Won't you get bricks if you mix clay and sand? Down here, the county agents tell us not to mix sand with our clay.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 14, 2009
7:09 PM

Post #7368208

Hello all,
I'm new to winter sowing. I am trying some seeds outside in various types of containers. I have read all the information I could get my hands on for wqinter sowing. However, I don't remember the issue of the drainage holes being addressed. How large should the drainage and vet hole be? Are slits sufficient or should I actually drill holes?
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 14, 2009
8:52 PM

Post #7368498

I use a knife, and just stab and twist 4 or 5 times. That way its a bit more of an opening that just the slit, and not as likely to get plugged.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 14, 2009
8:55 PM

Post #7368507

hey Neil... great minds think alike... I do the same thing.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
1:39 PM

Post #7370490

Ok, thanks! On the 2 liter pop bottles and the plastic milk jugs, do you just leave the top off for vent holes or do you make slits in those too?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
2:14 PM

Post #7370643

diamond... leave lids on. I'll see if i can find a image or two for you... other containers already have 1 big hole in the 'roof' ... that will be enough until it gets warmer and you can take the lids off. [sometimes temporarily]

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
2:16 PM

Post #7370651

well, i knew Karen would have an image of the 2 Ltr... looks like she puts little slits in the top half too
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=4578059

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
2:23 PM

Post #7370668

Here's a good page on Wintersown.org of various container ideas...
http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/Photo_Share.html
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
2:31 PM

Post #7370692

I never use the screw on cap on 2 liters or milk jugs. I throw them away immediately when I get jugs, I don't even save them. Therefore additional slits it the roof aren't necessary. I just find it easier to do it when I initially prep jugs (if I remember), then it's easier to poke something, anything, in and gouge it to enlarge holes. If my seedlings are going to be on the edge of "too hot or too cool" I want it to be cool. In spring, as the sun warms, the sun here can quickly heat a jug like a furnace.

I also only use 1 or 2 strips of duct tape vertically to close milk jugs so there are big gaping gaps there for air flow too. I like to breathe, I figure the plants do, too.

Karen
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
5:08 PM

Post #7371183

Thanks, from the pictures it looks like there are holes in the top of the containers. If it works for you all then hopefully, it will work for me. You all make it sounds so easy that I'm seriously thinking that I cannot mess this up, but I know I will LoL.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
5:29 PM

Post #7371232

Diamond... I have never put holes in the tops of containers, unless they were like Deli containers... like #2 potato salad... then i put holes. But milk, OJ, H&H... anything that has a "cap" ... you just toss the cap, like Karen mentioned, and that can be your hole.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
5:30 PM

Post #7371235

here is another example.. here, you can see the big yogurt and sour cream type containers.. I'll do the same with the deli with lids... I cut holes in these tops ... problem is, the holes are not visible... I'll have to see if i can find a better image.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
6:00 PM

Post #7371316

I got it now. Every container has drainage and ventilation holes, but a prexisting openings at the top will suffice. I have some food containers that fit right in with what you all have used. I appreciate the pictures and the prompt responses. I am so excited about learning something new in winter sowing! I have been starting seeds inside under grow lights for a few years. I have had some success but quite a bit of failure. I think I became so attached to the seeds that made that I was half afraid to put them outside. They felt like my own children! LoL

It sounds like you have much more successful plants when they are winter sown. At each phase of indoor sowing you had to expect to lose some plants. Hopefully, I will have some pictures soon of healthy seedlings. When do you usually see seedlings? Does the germination usually take place in the spring? Is that when I should keep a close eye and provide more ventilation or remove the lids, altogether?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
6:07 PM

Post #7371332

it all depends on the weather.

my first year, 2007, we had a warm Feb/march -- warm enough for germination.. i had a ton of seedlings.. then came 20° days and below zero nights... lost a few seedlings on that one... but i did cover them with a big blanket at night, then uncovered during the day - when they got a bit of sun warmth... that lasted about 4 days.

the hardiest of the seeds will usually germinate first... you can I are in the same zone, only 1 state away, so our weather is similar.

I'd start peeking mid-March or so, by April you should have quite a few... when the sun is really warming things up, check the containers, you may have to open the lids [but dont cut them off just yet] so the babies don't cook. Usually by May I've cut the lids off.

and for watering... this usually isn't an issue until May-ish ... when the sold looks pretty parched... give them a drink.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
6:47 PM

Post #7371431

So at what point do you remove the seedlings from th WS vessel 2 plant into their permanent home (either planters or flowerbeds)?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
6:55 PM

Post #7371461

I plant out hardy perennials and hardy annuals whenever
a. The soil is thawed
b. They have a set or two of true leaves and I can handle them
c. The weather is such that I won't freeze to death in the process. (Worrying about me, not the seedlings. I hate cold!)

Half hardy and tenders- around my last frost date.

Karen

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
7:03 PM

Post #7371483

You hate the cold and you live WHERE? Cincy? oHIo?

I went to visit my boyfriend's family in East Lansing, Michigan one year for Christmas. All the snow and the trees! Reminded me of a postcard.

The first morning I woke up, the weatherman greeted me with a hearty, cheerful, "Goooooooood Morning! The high for today will be MINUS eight degrees!"

My mom had a fur coat that had been hanging in the closet in New Orleans waiting for an occasion. So, she told me to wear it on my trip. I'll never forget getting off the plane in Michigan and how cold it was outside, and how WARM I was inside that fur coat!

Sorry, Karen. But, I'm a January baby -- and I LOVE the cold. Only thing I love more than the cold is swimming in the ocean -- I think that makes me a cold-blooded water baby!

Linda
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
7:21 PM

Post #7371539

LoL too funny gymgirl!
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
7:22 PM

Post #7371540

You love the cold and you live where? Houston? As in Texas?

Have you ever lived in the north? Spent 2 hours driving a few miles on an icy interstate? Stuck in traffic at a standstill for hours? I'm not talking snow, I'm talking ICE.
Ever shoved a foot of the white stuff off of a driveway 2 cars wide? Then found it covered again by the time you finished? Opened the garage door at 6:30 a.m. to go to work and found a 3 foot drift of white stuff blocking you in? It gets old.

I grew up in Pittsburgh, and it was colder and snowier than here. Compared to the 'burgh, this is the balmy south. We don't usually get all that much snow, though there are exceptions. It sure does get cold.

Karen
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
7:45 PM

Post #7371607

Amen from the Indiana corner. I'll take cold (only if you make me) over snow and ice any day. Not to mention the ice storms! Last year we got hit with the ice storm the week before Christmas. Thousands of families had no power, no heat and no lights. The hotels were full and would not even take reservations check-out time. The city completely ran out of generators and salt! I prefer the 70 - 80 degree weather Hawaii has year around. LoL

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2009
8:08 PM

Post #7371671

I hate the cold too... January baby too, but my blood is getting thinner...
Can not wait to move south...

anyhoo... I'll take the snow, you call can keep the cold and ice.

but Karen... being a life long mid-westerner .. been there done that with that list of questions...
My old house.. city lot ... no where to toss the snow... but drive was 110' long!! that was awful.

>>So at what point do you remove the seedlings from th WS vessel 2
Linda... pretty much what Karen said. Though I do not think I'm as quick as getting things plants as she is.

A few things go out in April, most in May, the stragglers June and later. I"m gone a lot in the summer, so they get planted when i'm home.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
8:59 PM

Post #7371845

Would you agree that most of the flowers that can be winter sown are the native plants? IE coneflower, rudbeckia, butterfly weed, butterfly bush?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
9:16 PM

Post #7371899

Terese: I'm pretty far south of you though, that makes a big difference on when you plant out.

Diamond: Those natives do well, to be sure. But lots of other things do well too. Anything that reseeds in your area should do well, too. You never know until you try. Or maybe I should say until you try several times.

Rudbeckias are always among my best.


Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
9:37 PM

Post #7371972

Your flowers are beautiful! Are those the Irish Eyes Rudbeckia? Are the orange flowers butterfly weed or Lanata? If those are Butterweed we have made my day! I was unsure of the growth habit of Butterfly weed. It looks like they are mounding???
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
9:53 PM

Post #7372009

Yes to both. They are offspring of my wintersown green-eyed ruds from my harvested seeds. I had both Irish Eyes and Prarie Sun, so probably a cross of the two.

The butterfly weed, also WSown, is A. tuberosa. It stays short and mounding. That is a fourth year plant.

I also wanted to add that those pictures of my 2 liter bottles above that tcs linked are several years old; I don't cut them like that any more because I prefer this method

First, cut jug in half. Cut 2 or 3 big upside down "V's" on the bottom rim of the top half.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
9:54 PM

Post #7372011

Shove top half on bottom and put outside

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
10:02 PM

Post #7372035

Sorry, I just can't retrieve the second picture now. But if you just shove top on bottom, you can pull up on the top to add vents in spring without cutting.

Karen
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
10:33 PM

Post #7372112

Excellent idea! What do you use to make the cuts and vent holes, utility knife? I tried a kitchen knife and I was lucky not to cut my hand off.

I see I have alot more to learn about plants. I have seen the term "tuberosa" but didn't investigate further to understand that it meant low and mounding!
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
10:40 PM

Post #7372129

diamond> "tuberosa" is just that sort of butterfly weed, there are others. If you google "butterfly weed" and/or "milkweed" you'll find other kinds, too. Milkweeds come in varying heights, colors, and hardiness. Some are annuals.

I make my first stab in a 2 liter with a utility knife. Then I finish with a pair of scissors. Always remember drain holes in bottom.

Karen
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
10:55 PM

Post #7372159

Ok Karen, one last question? Do you sow your seeds in seed starter mix or potting soil?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 15, 2009
11:10 PM

Post #7372208

Potting soil. I like several- ProMix, Fafard, Sunshine Mix. Often I lighten it up with extra perlite.

Karen

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 17, 2009
6:18 PM

Post #7377339

[quote]You love the cold and you live where? Houston? As in Texas?[/quote]


Karen,
Did I not mention the global warming trend has made our winter a little different than yours? ^^_^^_^^_^^
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 17, 2009
6:47 PM

Post #7377396

Gymgirl, I lived off FM 1960 by the airport for 23 years and then moved BACK to Minnesota. The cold is amazing. We're currently residing in Missouri trying to get back to MN. I do like the longer growing period here, and it's almost time to WS. Woohooo!
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2009
4:29 AM

Post #7392348

Hey Karen, have you used the one gallon milk juggs for WS? If so did you cut them in the same way you did the 2 liter bottles? I just put out some milk jugs. Do you draw a straight line around the bottle? What's the purpose? I have one heck of a time trying to get my bottle sealed to put the tape on once it was cut. LoL The 2 liter was much easier but the gallon jugs has more room so more potential flower and greater chance of success. LoL
LynnPhillips
Buckley, WA
(Zone 7b)

December 23, 2009
5:54 AM

Post #7392497

Diamond, I cut my milk jugs freehand, so they were not straight at all! I didn't tape them tightly shut, just a piece of duct tape as a hinge. I used just about every plastic item I could find that would hold a couple of inches of potting mix.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 23, 2009
6:00 AM

Post #7392502

Diamond... here is the way i do my milk jugs... and i too just cut free hand... i poke it with a small knife on either side of the lower 'handle' slice all teh way around... it cuts very easily, then i stop just on the other side of the handle, leaving that as my "hinge".

I twisty tie mine closed, but a piece of duct tape works too.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LynnPhillips
Buckley, WA
(Zone 7b)

December 23, 2009
6:06 AM

Post #7392503

I'll have to try the twisty ties this year. I think I will make holes on top also. I saved a bunch of my jugs from last year, don't know if they will be a time saver or not.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2009
7:25 AM

Post #7392534

Thanks TC and Lynn. I'm sure I'm making this harder than it has to be. LoL I'm stressing over the seeds I planted as though they were my children.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2009
1:27 PM

Post #7392753

Is it normal to become obsessed with winter sowing? LOL - I have 200 jugs ready to go - 144 ready for 16 friends who are coming over for a few Bring-Your-Own-Soil parties! My kitchen is full for my own use in two gardens. "Hi, my name is Cynthia and I'm addicted to milk jugs."

Our Starbucks will give you both coffee grounds and milk jugs - they are amazing. What do I do with the coffee grounds? Can I just sprinkle them on the gardens or do they need tilling and sit over winter?

The real Santa and Mrs. Claus
(sadly, the costumes fit, booo)

Thumbnail by hanseycollie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2009
1:56 PM

Post #7392836

The coffee grounds are supposed to be good for your garden, especially Rhodos in zone 5.
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2009
6:20 PM

Post #7393469

I like winter, but not the ice. Around here, we sometimes get "wintery mix" of rain/sleet/snow when the temperatures hover around freezing. They are predicting ice on Christmas day. Snow is fun, ice is treacherous. Started a couple of containers, plan to do more.

Glad to read that you just cover your containers with blankets during surprise Spring freezes. I am a new gardener, first time winter sowing. I was so sick of carrying trays of seedlings in and out this Spring (a record wet, cold spring).

I hate hot, humid weather. I used to travel for work to Puerto Rico and Miami. Walking out of the airport felt like entering a sauna. Yuck. Don't get me started on bugs, snakes and lizards. The best part of winter is that it keeps insects in check and reptiles in hibernation!
LynnPhillips
Buckley, WA
(Zone 7b)

December 23, 2009
7:35 PM

Post #7393621

Hanseycollie, that is a cute picture. You are very photogenic!
Diamond, I know how you feel. I stressed over them, and then I was nervous to take them out of their containers and plant them.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2009
7:46 PM

Post #7393636

Does anyone use the "dunk" method when planting or transplanting? Lynn, how did your WS flowers transplant?
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

December 23, 2009
8:51 PM

Post #7393792

Diamond, you mean hunk? HOS, hunk of seedlings. Yes; you'll get some pots that look like chia pets and no way you can separate all those seedlings. Just plant them out in hunks. They do fine.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2009
8:59 PM

Post #7393811

LoL @ Hemo No I meant the "dunk" method. This is supposed to help with transplant shock. I got this from a gardening class but I have never tried it and just wondered how and if it worked for anyone else. When planting or transplanting flowers, soak in a sloution of water and fertilizer while preparing the new planting site.
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

December 23, 2009
9:51 PM

Post #7393900

Diamond: This is the first I've heard of a "dunk" method. Feel free to post more info.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 23, 2009
9:59 PM

Post #7393920

I have this stuff called SuperThrive, and i used that for transplant shock.
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2009
10:40 PM

Post #7394001

I have been looking for superthrive locally. Ironically, I saw it in Walmart last year, read the flyer, thought it seemed "too good to be true." They didn't stock it this year.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 23, 2009
10:54 PM

Post #7394027

I've heard wallyworld carries it, but i have yet to find it.

I have this local... Brew and something... and they carry a lot of seed starting, hyponics stuff... found it there.
wasn't cheap, but a lil bit goes a long way.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2009
11:35 PM

Post #7394111

Hemo,

I copying and pasting the info from the class.

The ‘Dunk Method’

Best method because on some plants it brings them to life in about a half an hour. They just perk up.

Fill a bucket ˝ way with water, then put in ˝ a dose of the fertilizer you usually use. I.E. fish emulsion and organic root start if I want the roots to take off, normally uses fish emulsion.

Submerge entire potted plant. It will start to bubble. When the bubbles die down, then you take it out. Don’t pull it out of pot. Turn it sideways and kind of maneuver it out gently.

Use the ‘dunk method’ when transplanting as it saves the plant from shock. The plant will not go into transplant shock with this method.


This message was edited Dec 23, 2009 6:37 PM

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 24, 2009
2:14 AM

Post #7394510

I have found that many of the plants/seedlign are still small enough that there isn't any 'shock'.

I did use the SuperThrive on some Yvonne Salvias that I grew in a south window ... so those needed to be transplanted twice before getting them in the ground.

BUT -- during the spring, when it was warm but before I had started planting out... I had this gallon jug with SuperThrive, Compost Tea and water that i would water my seedlings with.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2009
3:14 AM

Post #7394651

I hear that compost tea is the best thing since sliced bread! Hopefullt, I will get the chance to try it next year. How did you make your batch?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 24, 2009
3:16 AM

Post #7394656

I have a compost "tumbler" and it has a base on it, where it rolls, the base collects the tea that drips off the compost as it cooks... I think it holds about 2 gallons... but i collect it maybe twice per year. I always have a milk jug in the garage with tea in it for watering.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2009
12:12 PM

Post #7395334

Do you have pictures of you flowers?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2009
12:40 PM

Post #7395377

Sorry I missed your question Diamond, I haven't had time to be on the forum for several days. I use mostly gallon milk jugs and a few 2 liters. I cut my gallon ones around the equator and leave a hinge, as in the picture tcs posted. I tape shut with one or two short vertical strips of duct tape.

Karen
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2009
1:45 PM

Post #7395501

diamond, I've been amazed how well wintersown seedlings transplant into the garden. They seem to be extra hardy started this way. I just water them in well and thats it. They usually don't even wilt.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 24, 2009
1:47 PM

Post #7395506

diamond... i have literally hundreds of photos from the past 3 yrs... anyone on particular you are thinking of?
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #7396264

Whew! I am glad to hear they transplant well. I think that information was geared more towards store bought plants. TCS I think I have seen some of your plant pictures. Do you have a favorite?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 24, 2009
8:23 PM

Post #7396349

I have a lot of favorites... here is one of them.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 24, 2009
8:25 PM

Post #7396353

I mostly post in the Cottage Garden "PIggy" threads...

here is one... scroll towards the bottom... Nov 3rd... i have 4 images posted here.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1052728/

This message was edited Dec 24, 2009 2:33 PM

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2009
8:58 PM

Post #7396421

I kinda think disturbing the roots ends up being a benefit- seems the seedlings develop deeper root systems into the native soil. After noticing that, I've become practically OCD about removing most of the nursery soil from any purchased plant before it goes in the ground. I use the hose sprayer to wash it off as I fill the hole its going in.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2009
9:02 PM

Post #7396433

Mine sometimes pout for a few days after transplant but then they acclimate. I think weather plays a part in how they react to transplant, too. In cool or cold weather they settle in fast. Warmer weather is more of a challenge.

Karen
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2009
9:55 PM

Post #7396558

Good point Karen, I wasn't thinking about those poor babies that get planted late (that I always have plenty of!). Typically after a couple of days of wilting those take off too. I try to get seedlings planted when rainy weather is in the forecast, some cloudy, drizzly days are great right after transplanting. Of course, that's luck of the draw, LOL.
jadajoy
Newport News, VA
(Zone 11)

December 25, 2009
12:30 PM

Post #7397413

Hey all,
I'm sorting seeds now for my January sowing. I was wondering if Morning Glories would wintersow well? I have so many different kinds from trades, I would like to see some of them blooming this year now that I have some time.

Merry Christmas All!!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 25, 2009
12:40 PM

Post #7397423

I did them ... trays of them [got about 80 seedlings] the cold snap we had in April killed a few, so do not sow them too early... but yes, you can winter sow them.

Merry Christmas.

Terese
jadajoy
Newport News, VA
(Zone 11)

December 25, 2009
12:41 PM

Post #7397427

Thanks!
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 25, 2009
2:44 PM

Post #7397573

TC, I'm in love with the Rudbeckia in one of your pictures. You have 3 varieties in one picture. It's the Rudbeckia with the orange/brown and yellow petals. I probably have it already but I has to tell you how pretty I think it is. I hope its one of the varieties I have WS.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 25, 2009
3:15 PM

Post #7397627

like these?

and yanno... i have absolutely no idea 'who' this is, and most of my Rud seeds were probably mixed together... and i'm not even sure if they 'come true' from the seeds.

they are pretty though.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 25, 2009
3:18 PM

Post #7397632

another one...

like i said... there are A LOT that i like.

but -- 99% of the plants 'out back' are WS'ed or direct sow, or fallen from the year before.
it looks chaotic at times... but very pretty with the variety of colors.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 25, 2009
5:40 PM

Post #7397877

LoL I love it! Now, I feel the need to have a garden that has a pattern or theme. I love the cottage type garden that are a controlled chaos. I want a little bit of everything in my garden but I may need a field to have it that way. LoL
LynnPhillips
Buckley, WA
(Zone 7b)

December 25, 2009
6:28 PM

Post #7397925

Merry Christmas everyone! Just popping in for a few minutes of peace and quiet to myself before the chaos starts.
I, too, had never heard of the "dunk" method. I will try it this spring.
Last year, I was so behind in planting out my babies, that I ended up just breaking them into hunks and plopping them into the ground. The fascinating thing was, the poor little straggly seedlings of salvia, 4 o'clocks and agastache that were the left over runts, grew into beautiful flowering plants. I planted them only because I felt guilty just tossing them out and not giving them a chance. Boy was I surprised. Love the WS'ing!

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 25, 2009
7:48 PM

Post #7398042

Merry CHRISTmas to everyone.

This day has been wonderful as I was able to spend time on SKYPE with son who is in Iraq right now... the day couldn't get any better.

Hope this day is just as grand for everyone else.

Janet
Indygardengal
Brownstown, IN
(Zone 5b)

December 25, 2009
8:31 PM

Post #7398077

Terese
I love chaotic.
Merry Christmas everyone.
Veronica
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

December 26, 2009
1:02 AM

Post #7398343

Oh, Janet, the very best gift of all was the visit with your son via Skype! So happy for you and I know you are still euphoric.

Merry Christmas to all. Now let's get busy with that winter sowing!

Angie
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 26, 2009
2:34 AM

Post #7398485

Janet, I am happy for you and your son. What an amazing gift!

Angie, I'm seriously going to have to find places to plant my winter sown flowers. LoL Hopefully, I will have lots of pictures this spring to share of healthy, beautiful flowers. I know most won't bloom the first year but I plan to throw in some annuals for a little color. If I am in zone 5, when do I WS the annuals? I'm sure I read it but sometimes I can only recall what I need to remember right now. LoL
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 26, 2009
11:11 AM

Post #7398948

Star of Yelta morning glories should winter sow well. Mine reseed every year in zone 5-6. Other varieties may be less resilient.

bigred
Ashdown, AR
(Zone 8a)

December 26, 2009
11:19 AM

Post #7398958

Checked my WS containers yesterday and spring has sprung in the winter! Poppies and dianthus sprouting in this weather. Maybe hi-30's yesterday w/ 20's at night.

Picture of poppy Black Peony...I also have poppies Thai Silk Rose and Jelly Beans coming up as well as dianthus Sooty and Idea Violet.I don't really start potting up or planting out until March. THREE MONTHS from now...I can't wait. Poppies ,pansies and violas will go out in Feb. though so maybe I can hold for that long...LOL

Thumbnail by bigred
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 26, 2009
11:26 AM

Post #7398960

diamond: Start annuals in spring. I start them around late March, early April in zone 6. I've started some as late as early May. So for 5a I would think around mid April. Most of them germinate fast at first sign of warmth. Just be prepared to give them a little protection in case of frost.

Karen
Hemophobic
Kannapolis, NC

December 26, 2009
1:17 PM

Post #7399040

Diamond: You'll be wonderfully surprised by your results and have flowers to fill in bare spots, new beds, and some to give to friends and neighbors!

For information regarding germination requirements, check out this link:

http://www.backyardgardener.com/tm1.html

Or you can simply use the plant guides here on DG for your annuals. If they require stratification or scarification, you'll need to know these things. Most of them can be wintersown, though, unless they're very tender tropicals or houseplants. I WS'd Clarkia Confetti last year, along with Nigella, Salvia viridis Palisades, which is supposed to be an annual, but I'm hoping it's perennial here. We'll see come spring!

The sticky at the top of the wintersowing forum has excellent information for first-time winter sowers, so be sure to read all of those. You're going to be amazed at your results! Trust us.
dennist
Marquez, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 26, 2009
4:19 PM

Post #7399467

Peggy, Contratulations! I planted my poppies (oriental) a little late...on Dec. 21 :} I think you planted yours around the 10th. Will be watching over the next couple of weeks for sprouts. Same weather here 20-30ish nights and 40ish days.
Dennis
bigred
Ashdown, AR
(Zone 8a)

December 26, 2009
4:24 PM

Post #7399479

Yea...around the 8th or 10th.
CrabgrassCentrl
New Milford, CT

December 27, 2009
2:19 PM

Post #7401456

This will be my second year of winter sowing. Last year I had success with about 25% of the seeds I put in. Does that sound about right, in general?

Got a couple of questions. I tossed last year's jugs into the yard shed with the lawnmower etc. Never washed them of residual dirt or algae, but they've sure been cooked during the hot days of summer. Can I just re-use them, or do I have to wash & sterilize them? I just figure nature doesn't sterilize anything, but then again I'm pretty darn new to gardening!

Also, my DH has what seems like a peculiar idea. He wants to try sowing in jugs with the lids on and NO holes at all. His theory is that the moisture you put in when you first sow the seeds will just stay there all winter, and he won't have to worry about watering during stretches like we just had, 3 weeks of bone-dry air, no precip whatsoever and frigid temps. Has anyone ever tried it this way? Personally I don't remember watering much last year, thinking that frozen soil doesn't need to be watered, until toward March-April when stuff started to thaw out. But he's got the scientific mind, not me, so I thought I'd run this by the group.

Crabby
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 27, 2009
2:29 PM

Post #7401482

My germination runs a lot higher than 25%, I'd say more like 80 to 90%. but I don't count seeds sown.

Are you talking about no holes in the top or the bottom or both? Never did that either, but I've never seen a plant than can grow without any drainage or any air. Also, seeds might rot with all that moisture, especially larger ones. I like sharp drainage and lots of air. Big containers like gallon jugs don't need much watering even in spring but mine get only morning sun.

I never sterilize WSing containers, but I don't like that algae stuff. If they had algae, I'd sanitize well with bleach, or get new jugs.

Karen
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

December 27, 2009
2:42 PM

Post #7401504

I agree with Karen about the necessity for drainage and air/moisture holes in WS containers. I've never watered in the colder months, especially when the soil mix is frozen. And later in the spring the air vents let spring rain in (or a gentle sprinkle from your watering can or hose.) You can generally tell if moisture is needed by the color and texture of the soil: dry soil is lighter in color than adequately moist soil, and sometimes pulls away from the sides of the jug or bottle.
I'd also worry that the seedlings might cook in the spring sun without ventilation holes. It can get pretty warm in there and the holes in the top let cooler air inside.

I used to bleach my milk jugs and plastic bottles before using them, but haven't for two years and can see no difference in germination. Mostly I discard the used ones after one season because I have to cut them up to get out my seedlings at planting time!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2009
2:54 PM

Post #7401517

>>about 25% of the seeds I put in

are you referring to the amount of seeds per container... say 1oo seeds, 25 seedlings?
or 100 containers and about 25 containers with germination?

last year i had a lot of 'duds'. containers with zero germination... I think some of it had to do with seeds rotting, not enough holes in the bottom... some -- i have no idea why.

Some containers I had about 50 or 100 seeds... [ i will count the seeds if i can. small/dust like seeds, obviously I can't]
but may have gotten 1-5 seedlings. I usually track this in my spreadsheet.

as for the milk jugs, I only rinse mine out. Have never used bleach. and mine always get tossed at the end of the season because they are usually cut to get the seeds out, but the lids are always cut off -- so they would be unusable.

But i would think any with algae to clean out, if it is only dirt... you are just putting dirt back in it again - so why bother with cleaning it?
CrabgrassCentrl
New Milford, CT

December 27, 2009
3:00 PM

Post #7401529

*sigh* I was pretty disappointed with last year's results, but I did pretty much what everyone else does after reading reading reading as much as I could here. So I don't know what to do differently except pray harder. :-)

I've shared your comments with DH but boy is he is stubborn about his ideas. I don't think I quite follow what he's really thinking so I'll just let him have at it and let y'all know what happens.

Crabby
CrabgrassCentrl
New Milford, CT

December 27, 2009
3:05 PM

Post #7401537

I'm giving a general result. I had 3 containers of foxglove seeds that turned into chia pets, and quite a few others of rudbeckia, echinacea and other hardy perennials with just a couple of seedlings out of 15-20 seeds. I'm too lazy to count much!

Since this is a science I suppose I have to content myself with doing pretty much what I did last year, just one more time, so I have results to compare. The early spring weather really sucked -- FREEZING for the time of year -- last year, so I assume/HOPE that's one variable that will change.
JanieP
Jacksonville, AR

December 27, 2009
3:44 PM

Post #7401599

Crabby
I didnt like my results WS for the first time this year. Like you I am going to try again. I dont think I put enough drainage holes in the jugs- one of several things I believe I did wrong. We also have had the wettest year on record.

What your husband wants to do works with cuttings such as Hydrangeas or Gardenias. I have used 2 liter coke bottles to start those cuttings. The bottles are never placed in the direct sun. If we are having a normal summer, the cuttings may "cook"-even out of direct sun-in July or August
Janie.
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2009
4:51 PM

Post #7401754

you'll need drainage holes but you can keep the lids on the keep the moisture in. Even when I sow my seeds in a sandwich bag, I cut some holes on the bottom.
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

December 27, 2009
5:12 PM

Post #7401805

Hi CrabgrassCentral (love your moniker):
Ya know, I think you're right to let your DH do his "closed container" thing--and you do the usual vent and drainage hole procedure--and compare! If you do some of the same seeds, you will have an experiment going! Keep us posted on the results of both.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 27, 2009
6:57 PM

Post #7402002

Okay, you guys really have my attention. I have 16 women coming for bring-your-own-soil parties and have 9 jugs each ready for each of them. I have a lot of drain holes in the bottom and holes in the top for ventilation. I was thinking 30-40 seeds/jug (coneflowers, rudbeckia, easy flowers). Is that a good number or more?

I've read all I can on WS. Now I'm freaked after reading this that they may not germinate, though mostly I've read that you can't fail. Does anyone else find some of these threads contradictory to each other? I guess it's maybe a trial/error system to find what works in your area? I'm north of Kansas City an hour - hoping for good results with my ladies. If not, how embarrassing! (Worst case scenario, we'll have fun planting seeds.) Cynthia
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 27, 2009
7:15 PM

Post #7402056

I am amazed that Big Red has germination already but is it because of the climate? I was under the impression I would even have to check containers until early March? We still have snow here in northern Indiana. Once you see sprouts is that when you remove the lids or just crack open for more air?
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 27, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #7402100

Cynthia, I'm no expert on WS this will be my first time but I have been playing with seeds for a long time. There is no guarantees for 100 percent germination of all of your seeds. You can mimic the perfect conditons and environment but seeds still may not germinate due to something being wrong with the seeds. I'm always surprised by what grows easily from seed and what doesn't. I have started a lot of plants from seeds and you can have them in the same enviroment but only get a protion of them to germinate. It sounds like you have something planned that is going to be a lot of fun! I would enjoy the event. Even if some have success where others fail, you can trade with one another which may be a reason for another party. LoL

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2009
7:40 PM

Post #7402118

Cynthia... I've been reading your BYOS thing... sounds like fun.

I'd think any 'wild flower' type flower you shouldnt have a problem with germination.

here are my Cone Flowers from 2007 -- per my notes, i had 5 rows of 20 seeds. so there were 100 seeds in here.
Rudbeckias are another where i'd have good germination.

as for 30-40 seeds per gal... i think it also depends on the seed.

Take Poppies for instance... you're not going to count them... they are dust.
Some seeds, you'd just take a 'pinch' and sprinkle it.

I guess you just use your best judgment.

It is sort of trial-N-error... but regardless, it's fun and it's fun to watch teh seedlings grow... and you will be getting more ladies into winter sowing.

Our weather probably is not that different... Just sow the seeds. stick them outside, and start looking for babies [weather depending] around March/April or so.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 27, 2009
8:30 PM

Post #7402218

TC when u see sprouts do you vent or completely remove the lids?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2009
9:20 PM

Post #7402329

no... i leave them be until it's warm out... really warm, like they would cook with the lids on.
once it's spring... and the temps are up... possibly 50's or so with full sun, and the containers are in the sun... i may take the lids off... but again, much of this is weather depending.
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 27, 2009
9:44 PM

Post #7402395

tcs, did you keep notes on how those Rudbeckias grew once into the beds? Your pan looks great. Did they all continue to grow well? Any pics?
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2009
10:07 PM

Post #7402447

it's trial and error. Some seeds will only germinate once the weather is warm. Many time I dump the soil in my container to reuse and find stuff sprouting up later.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2009
11:01 PM

Post #7402560

drapelady... those were Purple Coneflowers. and i have tons of photos of them on my main PC. [on the laptop now]
I do not believe i have any notes on them... they are second year bloomers, though i did get 1 single bloom in 2007
with this being their 3rd year... i have LOTS of them. I'll post an image when i get upstairs.

I like'em and the butterflies love them.

My notes pretty much ends with..."planted out" or did well.

the Ruds are a are first year bloomers... they always do well too.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2009
11:09 PM

Post #7402573

Here are the Eastern Coneflowers

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2009
11:16 PM

Post #7402588

creating a new thread... gimme a min or two...
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2009
11:18 PM

Post #7402592

tcs, if you have windows 7, you can share folders on the same network. I just tried it. it's the coolest thing!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2009
11:20 PM

Post #7402599

New thread...

and lili ... I'm still with XP.
i could set it up to share on my network... i have some 'shared' but dont think i have all my gardening images.


Come on over... http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1065142/
bigred
Ashdown, AR
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2009
11:49 AM

Post #7403504

My first experiences with WS were pretty sad too. Just keep plugging all and you'll suddenly find yourself with more plants than you know what to do with.
Indygardengal
Brownstown, IN
(Zone 5b)

December 28, 2009
3:24 PM

Post #7403872

Sorry to be off topic but I have tried 2 or 3 times to sow larkspur directly but if they come up I don't know what they are and I know they should be sown in the fall so they will come up and bloom in the spring. My question is can I go out and scratch the top ;of the earth and sow them now and if I do will they bloom this spring. I guess if mine have come up I thought they were weeds and pulled them. I am anxious to get a stand of them started..

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 28, 2009
3:27 PM

Post #7403878

Veronica... good to see you.

if you do do that.. stick in some sort of plant marker so you will know there may be seedlings in the spring.
a plastic knife with "Larkspur" on it should do.
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 28, 2009
4:38 PM

Post #7404030

Hiya Veronica! Check out these pics- image results from googling "larkspur seedling pictures"

http://images.google.com/images?q=larkspur+seedling+pictures&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=d944S4bsIseVtgfElYWLCQ&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CBAQsAQwAA

I wish every seed catalog would include seedling photos- it would save a lot of heartache!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 28, 2009
4:47 PM

Post #7404052

Don't forget to move on to the next thread... http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1065142/
dial-upers have problems with pages loading when they get too long.
Neal -- thanks for the link.

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


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