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Article: Getting To The Root Of Things. The Rutabaga: Its History, Uses, and Culture: RUTABAGAS

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Forum: Article: Getting To The Root Of Things. The Rutabaga: Its History, Uses, and CultureReplies: 3, Views: 42
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SIVAD331
Winthrop, MA

November 9, 2009
11:52 AM

Post #7255333

COOL WET SUMMER,AND WAS AWAY FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER . STARTED TO BRING IN RUTABAGS AFTER ARRING HOME NOV 02-09 BIGGEST WAS JUST OVER TEN POUNDS NO TOPS OR ROOT. CUT UP COOKED IN PRESSURE COOKER MASHED. ONE OF THE SWEETEST EVER. MOST WERE BETWEEN 5 TO 8 POUNDS. GAVE MANY AWAY TO FAMILY AND FRIENDS. SPENT ONE DAY COOKING THEM THEN BAGGING AND VACUUM PACKING BEFORE FREEZING . MAY NOT PLANT NEXT YEAR AS CROP WAS HUGH.
SIVAD331 BOSTON MA.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

November 9, 2009
12:53 PM

Post #7255440

Just a comment or two ,I am new to Rutabagas so I tried some last spring without any success made nice healthy plants but never did get any roots,probably grew for 4 months ..decided would try this fall planted the first week in September and it is looking to be more of the same news ,The ground is slightly rocky with some clay ,maybe I need to fertilize ????? Any hints will be tried...
annhelen
Townsend, GA

November 9, 2009
5:11 PM

Post #7256262

We have been growing and eating rutabagas in the deep south for generations. At first, the recipe for roasting them sounded wierd to me, since we are used to peeling them, boiling (preferably with ham or bacon bits), draining and then mashing them like potatoes. if they are large and mature, it takes them quite a while to cook until tender. However, I guess you can teach an old dog new tricks, so I will try the roasting method. I have tried adding them to roast meat and vegetables and was not happy with it. As for the ground they are grown in, it really makes a difference. Rocky clay would have to be conditioned with some compost to loosen it up. Rutabagas grown in new (prev. uncultivated) soil are superb. They can be grown in low-lying areas, and a field that was previously a pasture is heaven for them.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


November 9, 2009
5:15 PM

Post #7256281

As a Child of the South, I totally understand about the ham or bacon...any 'hog du jour' will do. We Southerners feel that nothing can be properly cooked without a hunk of it.

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Other Article: Getting To The Root Of Things. The Rutabaga: Its History, Uses, and Culture Threads you might be interested in:

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Rutabagas (swedes to Aussies) in soups Beverlyiris 5 Nov 10, 2009 9:07 AM


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