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Winter Sowing: What have you tried?

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McGlory
Southeast, NE
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2009
4:26 AM

Post #7265893

I'm participating in the Summerhill co-op, and was trying to pick seeds good for winter sowing. I don't know about some of them...

Is there some way to use the WS database that's easier than what I'm doing? I seem to have to wade through all 27 pages only to discover (sometimes) that what I'm looking for isn't there. I figure I'm not using it right. Any suggestions?

This is what I've tried that I KNOW works in my area or zone:

Nigella (I ordered two kinds from the co-op)
Hibiscus (I only tried hardy types)
Viola
Cosmos
Hollyhocks
Penstemon
Zinnia
Columbine

I had no luck with sweet peas, but I ordered some Lathyrus anyway. Only 8 seeds to a pack, so I ordered three. Gulp! With $10 worth of sweet pea seeds prior to discount, something should work! I ordered Thunbergia with the plan to direct sow in the spring. Is that best? Thunbergia vines are $20 each around here. I refuse to pay that much for an annual vine. Two years ago I had pansies blooming in the milk jugs before I figured out they'd sprouted.

Just babbling now. If you'd share your experience here, I'd sure appreciate it.

9kittymom

9kittymom
Bartlesville, OK
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2009
5:07 AM

Post #7340582

I am just posting so I will be watching. I haven't tried winter sowing but once. It was two years ago and I had milk jugs all over. Everything grew, BUT, it was so thick in there that I never did get them all out. I didn't do it again. How's that for encouragement. LOL

I start mine inside in March, april and May. I can start them outside but in starter cups in mid April and May too. With a hundred and some odd to start, I don't know how I am going to do it.

Susan
=^..^=
McGlory
Southeast, NE
(Zone 5a)

December 6, 2009
5:10 AM

Post #7340590

My luck outside with wintersowing has been MUCH better than my luck with starting seeds inside. I get the mildew, or damping off, or whatever the heck it is, every time.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

December 6, 2009
6:16 AM

Post #7340678

I tried with several different kinds of Sweet peas. Out of 4 flats I ended up with maybe a dozen plants. As you said, very expensive. I didn't try it again. I do believe it makes a difference as to how much snow you get, and how cold it gets.

Jeanette
mollymistsmith
Valdosta, GA
(Zone 8b)

December 6, 2009
7:04 AM

Post #7340761

I have had a problem with dampening off in the past but last year I started using coconut coir and it made a tremendous difference. I have not winter sown before but I might try this year during what winter we have here.

My family is in WV and they have had snow and freezing temps. Tonight is our first freeze warning.
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2009
7:07 AM

Post #7340762

I have never tried wintersowing before, but will try this winter. I am reading to see what kinds of seeds are successful.

I have always planted peas/sweet peas mid March, around my grandmother's birthday. It always worked, until last year when we had unseasonably warm weather in February, then freezes in April. I may wait until April 1 this year, depending on the weather.

I was so tired of carrying trays of seeds in and out this spring that I vowed to try a better way!
the1pony
(Pony) Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 6, 2009
8:34 AM

Post #7340865

I'm going to try wintersowing for my first time- I've been saving milk jugs and deli containers. I just don't have hardly any space at all indoors for starting seeds, so I really hope this will work for me.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2009
11:02 AM

Post #7340930

I've had extremely good results from wintersowing, much better than seed starting inside. I started in 2006 so this will be my fifth year. With wintersowing I have never sterilized the jugs or the planting medium but have never seen dampoff. Honestly, I don't even wash the jugs before using; I just rinse with water.

Dense seedlings don't have to be hard to remove from a jug. It works best to water the jug ahead of time so the soil is fairly moist; it will hold together better. Dump the jug into an old flat. It's OK to dump them on their heads for a minute, they won't notice. Then flip the whole blob right side up in the flat. Take a knife and cut them into hunks whatever size you want, and plant into the garden. Sometimes my hunks are as small as an inch square, sometimes I cut into 6 or 8 hunks. I've even been known to plant the whole blob into one planting hole. When working with very small hunks I plant them into the garden with a spoon.

This stuff is all explained on Trudi's site. She has spent 10 years perfecting these methods and posted them on the web for you so take advantage of it and review her site. A little time spent studying her information will increase your liklihood of a fun and successful WSing year. It will make things a lot easier.
Trudi's HOS: http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/Hunk-o-Seedlings.html

Karen
glevely
Sanford, MI
(Zone 5a)

December 6, 2009
11:09 AM

Post #7340934

thanks Karen this will be my first year ws and to say the least I'm nervous But I keep telling my self the first year is the hardest cuz I'm nervous ;0) this will be fun !!
Gloria
mollymistsmith
Valdosta, GA
(Zone 8b)

December 6, 2009
11:29 AM

Post #7340948

Karen,

Thank you for the information. :)
violap
Fremont, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2009
12:44 PM

Post #7341000

I plan on WS.I did a few last year but didn't really know what I was doing,but did have some success.With all your great advice I should have lots of success this year.
For my zone,when would be the best time to start?
violap
Fremont, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2009
12:48 PM

Post #7341002

McGlory,
I would think that any perrenial or Hardy annual that is normally good for your zone could be wintersown.As far as an easier way to look it up - its beyond me!
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2009
1:01 PM

Post #7341015

I live in Cincinnati and usually start in January after the holiday mess is over. Or, since I'm not doing so many, maybe it will be February this year. In the meantime I have some coleus, hypoestes and geranium cuttings I'm overwintering under lights to play with. I'll probably play with a few seeds started indoors, too, if I have space under my lights.

Some of my favorite candidates for WSing are rudbeckia, echinacea, penstemon, agastache, columbine, butterfly weed, digitalis, snapdragons, nasturtiums, nigella, petunia, salvia, marigolds, zinnias, forget me nots --- oh heck, I love 'em all.

Karen
violap
Fremont, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2009
1:08 PM

Post #7341033

The main things I'm trying to ws this year is for a shade garden th at I am starting basically from scratch and I want a large amt of plants in a short time so I thought this would be the fastest and least expensive ay to go.

I've done some geranium cuttings.I had a beautiful coleus that I should have taken cuttings of.But every time I try coleus it doesnt work.Any suggestions?
mom2goldens
Carmel, IN
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2009
1:27 PM

Post #7341062

I'm also trying WS for the first time this year. I have way too many seeds to start indoors, so hope this will work for me. Lots of good information in this forum, but I'm sure I'll have more questions.
Can't wait to hear about everyone's experience with this.
klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

December 6, 2009
1:36 PM

Post #7341079

I tried it last year for the first time. Had fairly good success. There were a handful that never came up, so I will be saving back some of each to try inside if the WS doesn't work with a particular kind of seed. My best successes were with Cleome, Columbine, Liatris, Echinacea (though they came up slow), Cilantro, Campanula, Calendula, Foxglove,
and Stock.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2009
1:36 PM

Post #7341080

violap: when you say every time you try coleus it didn't work, are you talking about wintersown, indoors under lights, or cuttings? I'm pretty new to coleus but find them easy. I only tried WSing coleus once, sown in spring. They stayed way too small until about late July or August when the heat and humidity started cranking. I did start a few indoors last year and they did well. I really prefer to play with cuttings.

I find coleus to be about the easiest plants to grow. Indoors, cuttings under lights do so well with benign neglect- just keep them dry with good light and they take care of themselves pretty well. Just keep them pinched.

Karen
violap
Fremont, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2009
1:50 PM

Post #7341099

Karen,I did cuttings.Maybe I kept them too wet.No lights.I have a room with skylights that I did them in.I ordered some seed that I'm going to start indoors.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 6, 2009
4:21 PM

Post #7341457

Hey everyone:) Made it here finally:lol:

I will have to stop myself from doing way too many jugs--I already forsee that being a problem. I have terrible luck starting anything indoors and really don't have the patience to devote to them.

I'm in a townhome and have a small front bed and a bunch of containers out front as well, a back patio full of containers and I've started digging up alongside the building as I am in a corner/end unit:lol:

Planning to try:

Rudbeckia Tiger Eye
Hollyhock Queeny Purple
Hollyhock Black Currant Whirl
Snapdragon Frosted Sunset and Animation Cognac (Johnny's)
Zinnia Zahara Rose Starlight
Heliotrope Marine
Penstenmon Electric Blue and Violet Dusk
Dianthus Raspberry Ripple and Poem
Various Salvias coccineas (peach, pink, red and white)
Salpiglossis Scarlet and Chocolate
Pansies and violas

Uh, yeah, that is way too much for me:lol: I may end up doing the 2 liter containers rather than the gallon milk jugs.
McGlory
Southeast, NE
(Zone 5a)

December 6, 2009
4:34 PM

Post #7341497

Dmac, are those all varieties you've tried winter sowing before, or are you experimenting?
angele

December 6, 2009
4:49 PM

Post #7341534

Butting in... right smack in the middle of a conversation

Brand new to wintersowing so I'm watching this thread too. The only thing I've sowed so far out of my purchase is 3 of the 35 Chocolate Streamer Sweet Pea seeds. Talk about baby steps, lol. I figure I would stagger the sowing and maybe I'll get some
McGlory
Southeast, NE
(Zone 5a)

December 6, 2009
5:58 PM

Post #7341738

This is what I ordered from the co-op that I have successfully winter sowed before (or at least the same genus):
Alcea Hollyhock 'Peaches ‘N’ Dreams'
Aquilegia Lime Frost, variegated
Leucanthemum 'Crazy Daisy'
Nigella Love in a Mist Dark Blue
Nigella 'Red Jewel'
Viola, Fuji Dawn variegated foliage
Zinnia Cherry and Ivory Swizzle
Zinnia elegans Envy

These are ones I ordered that I think I'm going to try winter sowing unless someone tells me I'm stupid for trying :-)
Penstemon Electric Blue
Amaranthus 'Early Splendor'
Centaurea Chocolate (C. moschata ssp.suaveolens)

This is what I ordered that I will not winter sow unless someone tells me they have had success:
Thunbergia Susie clear-eyed yellow
Thunbergia Whopper Orange
Basella Rubra, Climbing Spinach
Mina Lobata Exotic Love

These I have no idea what I'm doing: :-) Angele, how did you sow your sweet pea seeds?
Lathyrus Azureus

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 6, 2009
6:18 PM

Post #7341783

out of these two... .
Penstemon Electric Blue
Centaurea Chocolate (C. moschata ssp.suaveolens)

the Electric Blue... i had 21 seeds and i have 1 seedling. the plant is now in my DR window and i'll baby it thru the winter. I'ts about 5-7" tall. I just want to see it bloom. It's hardy to zone6, where i am 5a. I was thinking i could try it against my south facing foundation and it MAY come back, but since it has not even bloomed yet, I dug it up.

the Centaurea... I know I did these, got them in the Co-Op last year ... i'd have to check my notes, to find what happened, but i do not have them in the garden. I think i may have shared with someone, i should try to track them down and see if they had luck.


Amaranthus sow easily... i've done them the past 2 yrs.


dmac... Nice list...
angele

December 6, 2009
6:27 PM

Post #7341808

McGlory, I just planted them outdoors; one in a pot, two in the ground.. is that wintersowing?
toofewanimals
Trenton, MI
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2009
6:31 PM

Post #7341817

The Centaurea Chocolate I tried inside and wintersowed last year. Nothing from WSing, and from 5 seeds indoors got only 2 plants.
McGlory
Southeast, NE
(Zone 5a)

December 6, 2009
6:37 PM

Post #7341833

tcs, shoot! I never noticed the hardiness, or lack thereof, of the Electric Blue Penstemon. I hear "Penstemon" and I think "hardy." Darn! No, I'd guess winter sowing won't work for those.

Angele, I think that's called direct sowing, but I'm no expert. Maybe someone else will chime in.

toofew, your experience speaks volumes! Let's see what tcs1366 finds out from notes. I'm finding everyone's input very helpful!
angele

December 6, 2009
6:47 PM

Post #7341867

you are right, I searched 'what is winter sowing' and wintersown.org clearly says it involves the use of "mini-greenhouses"
I thought it was simply sowing in winter.. we have winter temps even though the calendar says Fall

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 6, 2009
7:02 PM

Post #7341917

OK... I found my printed spreadsheet... .my notes on the "Chocolate" says...

date sown 3/4/09 - 16 seeds sown, 5 germinated on 3/19/09... and "No idea what happened to them"

I'm sure i planted them out somewhere... I guess I could go out back and see if i can find the plant tag - if i even did one.

I'm not having much luck finding too much inf on this, like annual or perennial or zone.
I did find this... http://davesgarden.com/community/journals/viewentry/226617/

I could drop SW a note to see how they worked out for her.

Here is a link to my spreadsheet on Google
http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0Avcsp97ckJSUcEZ2ZmZPZUhQc1RxeEEzc29TQzNpYUE&hl=en

it should be updated from 2009. I'm currently working on 2010.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 6, 2009
7:09 PM

Post #7341940

crap -- they are annuals... so i certainly wont see any blooms.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 6, 2009
8:14 PM

Post #7342104

McGlory--I've never done it before even though I've been reading and lurking in this forum for a couple years:)

I put my sweet peas directly in the giant container I would like them to grown in a few days ago. I've tried them inside and we seem to rush right from winter/ frost warnings to a steamy spring and my seedlings never get a chance at mild spring temps. I'm hoping the little guys will know when it's right for them to do their thing and I get some sweet peas this season. Gave all my sweet peas collection away a few years ago so I gathered again this year so I could give in situ a try.


I've looked up some of the lists of seeds that are suitable for WS so I think most qualify. I'm more of an annual girl who likes a few perennials due to my space constraints. Can't deal with big stuff either for the same reasons. I've got my TB iris, daffs, daylilies and hosta addiction I've got to juggle with my seed luv:lol: I'm babying a couple of brugs inside and am thinking of bringing in the two tropical hibiscus on the patio:lol:

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

December 6, 2009
9:31 PM

Post #7342330

I will be reading this thread with interest to see what everyone does. I bought mostly annual seeds, but I guess you can WS annuals, too??? Probably start them in Feb. is my guess.
I do have a cool greenhouse but most of the space is taken up with tomatoes and peppers, squash and basil, etc. I have always started my own veggies, but haven't started annuals and perennials very often.

How do the jugs fair in wind? We have windy days here quite often. I have an outdoor slated bench. Maybe I could tie them to the bench somehow. Hmmm

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 6, 2009
9:40 PM

Post #7342354

>>How do the jugs fair in wind?

that is why i put mine in cardboard boxes. I have heard some tie a bunch of gallons together to keep them from possibly blowing around. Milk crates will work too.

I think i have a photo around somewhere... http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=6233412
roserairie
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2009
10:35 PM

Post #7342507

I wintersowed a lot of Summerhills seeds last year and they did well. all the columbine especially did well. I plan to to the same this year. The annuals I started in early spring and perennials I did from Nov to January.
Rose

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 6, 2009
11:29 PM

Post #7342679

My Summer hill seeds were hit or miss... more on the "miss" end. the coleus did well.
I'm still hoping I can get the Black Current Whirl HH to germinate... i really wanted to see what those looked like.

About half of what i bought, i used all the seeds... I think 4 varieties i still have some left.
toofewanimals
Trenton, MI
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2009
11:50 PM

Post #7342739

tcs, didn't the cardboard boxes begin to fall apart?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 6, 2009
11:52 PM

Post #7342756

not the thicker ones... actually, most of them held up pretty good. I just threw one of them away today, as the bottom was shot... but most I will reuse this winter. They were the heavy duty type you get from the grocery store/produce.

but -- all the ones i've used have made it thru one season.
klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

December 7, 2009
12:00 AM

Post #7342783

I had trouble with cardboard getting mushy. But, this summer I bought a giant black tub in the concrete and mortar section of Lowes, to mix mortar in. It's will probably hold 6-12 WS containers, and the sides are high enough that I can fill it to bottom water. Tougher than the flats I used last year. They were under 5 dollars, so I got a couple, just to have some to haul things around in. Can't wait to give them a try. Moving containers around, and bottom watering them one at a time in a foam cooler I had was a bit of a pain last year :)
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 7, 2009
12:48 AM

Post #7342943

I keep mine in plastic bins, holes drilled in the bottom. 2 liters are lighter and get blown easily but gallon jugs pretty much stay put even in very high wind.

Karen
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 7, 2009
2:25 AM

Post #7343257

McGlory, I am so glad you gave us this link. Thank you. I don't think I can contribute, but I can sure ask questions. LOL First time I've ever planted seeds. Thank you all for your wonderful input.


Debbie
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 7, 2009
3:20 AM

Post #7343445

violap: I hope you have better luck this time with the coleus. Then maybe you can try cuttings from those next winter.

There is a coleus forum here at Daves, lots of nice people who share their expertise. I lurk there sometimes, always enjoy all the pretty photos.

Karen
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 7, 2009
1:57 PM

Post #7344304

I found this wonderful info. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=7184334 From what she says, she just plants her seeds where she wants them to grow and covers them with a jug. Anyway, it makes for great reading and it sounds easy enough for this newbee. Of course, I have 2 acres and I can always paint the outside of jugs with translucent paint to try to hide the ugly. LOL

This link is also on that thread. http://tomclothier.hort.net/index.html

This message was edited Dec 7, 2009 8:05 AM

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 7, 2009
2:23 PM

Post #7344373

ah - yes, i love Clotheir's site. great seed info.

boy -- havent seen scicci in quiet some time... wonder where she's been.

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

December 7, 2009
7:17 PM

Post #7345543

tcs--Thanks for your picture of your cardboard boxes. Really helpful. Besides wind, we get scads of rain in the spring. I'll try to find really sturdy ones. Thanks
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 7, 2009
11:23 PM

Post #7346485

There are waxed boxes for something, can't remember what now, maybe fruit? Those would last a while.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 7, 2009
11:31 PM

Post #7346511

here was my Rubbermaid tub with holes drilled... i filled it with nursery pots. Most did pretty well. I should have put more holes in the lid though... some areas were quite dry and I had to water a lot in the spring.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 7, 2009
11:49 PM

Post #7346589

Wonder if I could use my 4" cow pots in a plastic tub like that...they may be too small and dry out too fast though...1/2 gal and 2 L containers I think will work best for me I think:)

Great photos tcs1366!!
DenverJude
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 8, 2009
12:03 AM

Post #7346630

I only did one container last winter. It was cosmos. They grew like crazy and got _huge_ in the yard after transplant.
I also did a bunch of direct sow and planting of perennial seedlings with just the top of the jug over them (pressed into the ground an inch or so). For this I did coreopsis from seed and a couple of different agastaches & sedum from small seedling plants I bought at an end of season sale, along with some small divisions of linum/blue flax. They all did fantastic. I did have to water a bit when it got warmer in early spring. We're pretty dry here.
glevely
Sanford, MI
(Zone 5a)

December 8, 2009
12:18 AM

Post #7346662

we get chicken in waxed boxes where I work there nice thick ones I'm going to get some of them I bet if you ask at your markets they would have some too ;0)
Gloria
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 8, 2009
7:09 AM

Post #7347794

The strongest boxes are the waxed ones bananas come in. Every produce dept has them, if you can get them to give them to you.
glevely
Sanford, MI
(Zone 5a)

December 8, 2009
11:28 AM

Post #7347908

I don't know about other stores we have to save our banana boxes for returns to the grocery co.
Gloria
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 8, 2009
10:51 PM

Post #7349824

Well, being new to seeds this year, I took an extra long time to look up all the ones that I ordered to make sure they were either sown in spring after last frost or sow outdoors in fall. Because Summerhill's does not give that info to order by. I really didn't want to start any indoors. I based my selections on info in Plant files, Renee's Garden Seeds, Parks Seeds and Thomas Seeds. I confirmed each finding to at least one or two others, to make sure. But much to my dismay, none of the instructions on Summerhill's seed packs match those that I found in my research before hand. Almost everyone of the 31 packs I purchased have these instructions : Sow in moist potting mix keep at 68-72 degrees and bright light. Transplant to 3" pots when ... etc

Now I'm really confused. What to do?

This is my list
Can anyone tell me there experience with these different ones on wintersowing.

Alcea Hollyhock Summer Carnival
Arctotis Grandis, white
Asarina scandens 'Sky Blue'
Clitoria, Blue ternatea
Cosmos Cutesy Mix
Cosmos 'Double Click'
Crape Myrtle Little Chief MIx
Dahlia Figaro Red NEW FOR 2009
Dianthus Valentine NEW FOR 2009
Echinacea 'Double Decker'
Flying Saucers Morning Glory
Geranium Pinto Quicksilver
Geranium Ringo Rose Star
Geranium Tornado Fuchsia
Hibiscus mutabilis 'Confederate
Hibiscus 'Southern Belle' mix
Impatiens Carousel Red double blooms
Lupin Morello Cherry
Penta Starla Deep Rose
Petunia Avalanche White
Petunia Double Cascade Mix
Platycodon Hakone double blue
Platycodon 'Hakone White' double
Plumbago Escapade Blue
Plumbago Escapade White
Ptilotus Joey NEW FOR 2009
Verbena Romance Scarlet Eye
Verbena Tuscany White
Vinca Mediterranean  Mix (SHS-0
Zinnia Cherry and Ivory Swizzle
Zinnia Wedding Bells White
Zinnia Zahara Rose Starlight

Thanks for any info. Maybe it will help someone else as well.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 8, 2009
11:03 PM

Post #7349855

I have not purchased a lot of seeds in the past 3-4 yrs, but it does seem their directions are for indoor or direct sowing.

I do think most of what you have can be winter sown, though the more tender annuals just do a bit later.
OH -- i see our location... geeze -- you could probably do your annuals in Feb, when i'm doing my perennials.

I'll check back in a bit... if no one else has not gone thru your list... i'll pick thru what i have tried already.

Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 8, 2009
11:10 PM

Post #7349875

Thank you so much tcs. So much.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 8, 2009
11:22 PM

Post #7349908

Alcea Hollyhock Summer Carnival Hollyhocks have been hit or miss for me. But still a great candidate for WS or direct sowing.

Cosmos Cutesy Mix Cosmos... easy to WS
Cosmos 'Double Click'

Dahlia Figaro Red NEW FOR 2009 I couldn't WS Dahlias to save my life... but others have no troubles at all

Dianthus Valentine NEW FOR 2009 Dianthus WS'ed easily

Echinacea 'Double Decker' Easy to do, 2nd year bloomers


Petunia Avalanche White I couldn't WS a petunia to save my life... but others have no troubles at all
Petunia Double Cascade Mix

Platycodon Hakone double blue No troubles with Platycodons
Platycodon 'Hakone White' double

Ptilotus Joey NEW FOR 2009 Trying JOEY for the first time this winter

Verbenas I have had luck with Ws'ing.
Verbena Romance Scarlet Eye
Verbena Tuscany White

Zinnia Cherry and Ivory Swizzle Zinns do very well WS'ed as a tender perennial or direct sown
Zinnia Wedding Bells White
Zinnia Zahara Rose Starlight

Hope this helps,

Terese

This message was edited Dec 8, 2009 5:24 PM
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 8, 2009
11:25 PM

Post #7349918

Really not necessary. Just do the basics- moist potting mix in jug, adequate drainage, sprinkle seeds, toss it outside. That's it.

perennials and hardy annuals-winter
tender annuals- close to your spring

That's it. The beauty of wintersowing is it's simplicity. Don't make it harder than it has to be. Seed pack instructions are for indoors under lights. You are not sowing inside, this is a whole new animal. A simple process.

Karen
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 8, 2009
11:35 PM

Post #7349941

Now this is what's so interesting, funny really. I had no problems at all with hollyhocks. But I can't get platycodon to sprout to save my life. I've WSown it 4 times and never a sprout. Just about every wintersower I know has grown balloon flower with no problem. But it seems I'll never have one.
Petunias are no brainers for me and I was overrun with volunteers last year.

Rule of thumb: A petunia is a petunia is a petunia. If one type wintersows, all will. Same with any type of flower, be it echs, foxglove, hollyhock, cosmos, whatever.

Karen
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2009
11:50 PM

Post #7349997

I know some stuff that people have WS, I've just planted in the containers I plan for them to be in once frost is over and let em do their thing so I'm not sure I'd wintersow those--nasturtiums, lobelia, cosmos and thunbergia. I think since I have a "longer" summer season those must work OK sown in situ. Might try a bit of those both ways and compare results...
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 8, 2009
11:56 PM

Post #7350011

Most years those things do OK even direct sown here in my zone. But we get really warm weather some years, whereas last spring and early summer were ususually cool. My direct sown nasties didn't do well at all, barely grew, but most years it works great.

Karen
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 9, 2009
12:07 AM

Post #7350032

Hmm, I'm waiting til it's warm for the nasturtium and put them straight in the ground. They were the first thing that died when we had our first cold snap, and I don't think they'd sprout til it's warm anyway. If I thought they'd be ok starting inside I might since they take forever to get going here, but I've had no luck with that, even with cowpots.
Dahlias and Zinnias I started inside did well, I'm going to try Zinnias WS this year. I think it may take too long for the dahlias to sprout outside to get flowers in time, so I'm doing them inside again.
My lobelia (trailing type), petunias, and cosmos lived on long after it got cold, in fact the lobelia only just got icky when we got snow, so those i'll WS this time. They should make it thru a late frost.
Anything that is a hardy perennial here is going outside this winter. Some of them are going to need cold to get going anyway and if i put them in the 'frige I'll just forget them.
Keep in mind I don't start many of any one type b/c I'm in a townhouse (and the end unit wasn't ready when we needed to move or I'd be starting way more). If i needed gobs of anything I would almost have to start it outside.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 9, 2009
12:47 AM

Post #7350161

Karen -- isn't that just ironic... another thing i can't grow to save my like is Joe Pye ... 3 yrs running and ZIP. Little Joe, Chocolate Joe, none of them... but i wont give up. OH .. and "Snaps" -- they grow like weeds, but not here.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

December 9, 2009
2:03 AM

Post #7350359

grrlgeek, I left you a message on the Summerhill shipping thread telling you we expect pictures and good notes to tell us how you do. Jeanette
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2009
2:44 AM

Post #7350486

grrrlgeek-sounds like we're in almost the same housing/garden situation except I do have and end townhome. I have also started digging up alongside the end of the building. Landlord doesn't mind as long as I maintain it.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 9, 2009
3:31 AM

Post #7350636

Terese, I've never tried Joe. But snaps do grow like weeds for me!

Karen
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 9, 2009
3:36 AM

Post #7350652

dmac, I saw you post that somewhere, that's what made me remember why I wanted an end unit. We own ours, so as long as it looks ok to the home owners association, and I can keep the "landscapers" off it, I can grow it. I did veggies in tubs on the narrow balcony in front this year. Gotta get creative!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 9, 2009
3:38 AM

Post #7350658

at our old house, where homes are stacked on property lines... our neighbor had Snaps on the north side of his house... with in 2 yrs, the whole area was full and they started growing in my south bed... they grew like crazy for years. when we were moving, DH grabbed a lot of seed heads and sprinkled them all in my back flower beds... not ONE grew. and since then, i've attempted to WS them twice, still nothing...
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2009
10:42 PM

Post #7353214

That sounds like some of the stuff I try:) Can't grow a decent tomato plant to save my life...mom grew them like weeds and canned all summer.
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 9, 2009
10:49 PM

Post #7353228

Veggies I can do. Actually, I have pretty good luck with anything outside. It's inside plants I kill. Cats are a bit of a handicap there.
klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

December 10, 2009
12:40 PM

Post #7354742

hmm, know what you mean grrlgeek. Thought I had it bad last year with two cats, but this new kitten, he eats EVERYTHING! Haven't found something he won't take a bite of. Unbelievable. He'll even clean a plate with curry sauce all over it! My bougainvillea's that are supposed to be overwintering inside are NOT happy. Their thorns don't even stop him.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
11:20 PM

Post #7356739

I once had a dog that ate an entire rosebush thorns and all. Animals are just stupid.

Karen
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 11, 2009
1:19 AM

Post #7357207

OMG, was he bleeding? I think even my one ignatz cat wouldn't do that. He prefers long skinny leaves--lemon grass, ponytail palm, etc.

To get back on topic (i'm such a trouble maker), I think I'll try to WS the Piggyback plant. Somewhere I read that it may need cold to germinate. It's not supposed to be hardy here, but I might try to overwinter some in a sheltered spot, as well as bring some inside for houseplants. For those of us that are going to try Ptilotus Joey, J.L.Hudson lists it as a genera that may benefit from smoke treatment, he describes what to do at http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/Germination.htm , scroll down to "Smoke Treatment". Looks pretty easy to do.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 11, 2009
1:42 AM

Post #7357295

>>benefit from smoke treatment

oh, now that is odd. I do have liquid smoke on hand...
roserairie
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

December 11, 2009
6:51 PM

Post #7359256

I ordered Ptilotus joey also. I know I tossed my liquid smoke out but I guess I'll have to buy more.
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 11, 2009
7:28 PM

Post #7359346

And this is the only thing I'll use it for. I wonder if it freezes?

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

December 11, 2009
8:00 PM

Post #7359425

Doesn't liquid smoke have a huge shelf life?
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 11, 2009
8:10 PM

Post #7359456

True. That was my Scottish side. Wonder how long it takes to get gross? I guess I could spring for a new bottle every few years ^_^
glevely
Sanford, MI
(Zone 5a)

December 12, 2009
12:45 AM

Post #7360214

liquid smoke has a shelf life of almost forever !!! but a small bottel of it only cost .99 most any where ;0)
Gloria
roserairie
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

December 14, 2009
1:56 PM

Post #7367303

Liquid smokes does have a long shelf life. I bought it for one recipe and never used it after that. Maybe its one of those products that lasts indefinitely. I wonder if I could use it on other seeds.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 14, 2009
2:21 PM

Post #7367379

we only use it for it for making BBQ sauce... So, i've probably had the one in our cab for 15+ yrs.

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

December 17, 2009
3:54 AM

Post #7375920

Yes, at least. Glad to hear others save things as long as I do. LOL
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 26, 2009
4:47 PM

Post #7399530

Ok, Christmas is over... time to start wintersowing my seeds. Yahhhh...

I must keep in mind... 'keep it simple, keep it simple'. LOL

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

December 26, 2009
4:51 PM

Post #7399537

I'm still trying to get enough gallon milk jugs and I will probably wait until the end of Jan or beginning of Feb. But, I'm thinking about it every day.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 26, 2009
7:50 PM

Post #7399858

I'll probably start slicing and dicing my 2L and other random containers (from cider, Ocean Spray juices...whatever!) tomorrow and maybe do some seed choosing tonight.
The Coke vendor where I work was kind enough to give me a few of the trays that are molded to hold the 2L bottles secure (each tray holds 8 2L bottles) so at least they won't be in danger of blowing over AND I'll be able to pick them up and move them in the trays.
toofewanimals
Trenton, MI
(Zone 5b)

December 26, 2009
11:24 PM

Post #7400270

dmac, that is a great idea ... the trays for the 2 L bottles!!!!!
McGlory
Southeast, NE
(Zone 5a)

December 26, 2009
11:26 PM

Post #7400278

I agree. Great idea! I'll have to talk to a friend who works for Coke...
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 27, 2009
6:58 PM

Post #7402005

My husband and son always buy 8 bottles at the time, in a the black plastic tray that holds them. We drink alot of soda, so I have about 15 of the black trays with the empties now. I am going to get some Krylon paint for plastic and spray the holders white to match my little pickets fences. I'm also painting a 1" line around the split I'm slicing in the bottles, the color that the flowers will be. (Great way to use up older acrylic paints) and it just takes a sec. A one inch brush, dip, twirl bottle, done. That way I can place them where I want that color flower after it gets closer to spring and they have sprouted. I'm doing the same thing for my spring bulbs, only I'm cutting the bottle top totally off, about 3" from the top and putting a 1/2 " chicken wire over the top so the squirrels don't eat for free. I'm just going to let my bulbs grow and bloom in those containers and then when they start dying back, I can just move them to the shed for next year.

The only thing I am still not sure of, is how many of each seed to put in the bottles. LOL The bulbs, depending on what type and size , I am only putting two or three per bottle. But I am clueless on the seeds.


This message was edited Dec 27, 2009 1:00 PM
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 27, 2009
7:11 PM

Post #7402041

Wow, Drapelady, I never thought of planting bulbs in containers like this - I have some allium that didn't make it into the ground so think I'll try your thought.

Great idea on painting a color on the jug - never thought of that but wow, would that make planning the garden easy! GREAT GREAT IDEA. Off to Hobby Lobby tomorrow for different colored paint pens. This made my day.
LynnPhillips
Buckley, WA
(Zone 7b)

December 27, 2009
7:14 PM

Post #7402051

What a great idea Drapelady! I think I will try painting a little strip of color on some of the jugs. I also need to add something that will give me a clue of their size. I oopsied and have some tall plants where I really wanted something shorter.
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 27, 2009
9:10 PM

Post #7402306

Lynn. I thought using the 1" acrylic paint line around the split line would give me a place to write the name and height of the plant with a paint marker in a different color. (hollyhock-36"-sun)

hansey, remember with the bulbs, I am cutting off and leaving open the top 3" or 4" of the jug. In other words, I'm just using them like pots. But I am still going to add the paint line at the top edge.

with the W/S seeds I am splitting the bottle and leaving a portion uncut for the hinge.

mollymistsmith
Valdosta, GA
(Zone 8b)

December 29, 2009
2:23 AM

Post #7405550

You are so creative. What a wonderful idea. Thanks for sharing.
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 29, 2009
3:54 AM

Post #7405781

Well, I have all of my supplies, paints, bottles, paint pens, seeds. And Christmas is behind me. Now, Molly, tomorrow I start separating the seeds and sending yours on to you. When are you going to start W/Sing yours? Or have you already started?
mollymistsmith
Valdosta, GA
(Zone 8b)

January 1, 2010
7:24 PM

Post #7417076

I am starting today! If it's true that whatever you are doing on New Years you will be doing all year I figure I want to be gardening all year. LOL.

Tami :)
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2010
1:34 AM

Post #7418214

What are you all WSing? I have clematis, malva, foxglove, hollyhocks, rud, btterfly bushes, delphs ,d something I'm sure I'm forgetting. In a couple of months I want to try WSing the annuals.
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 6, 2010
2:39 AM

Post #7432970

I am also trying clematis, hollyhocks and foxgloves. Have rudbeckia, echinacia and rose of sharon in the wings. I am unsure if I am doing annuals outside or inside, depends on space and schedule. I will start tomatoes inside, I need as much of a head start as I can get ! It is so helpful to see what plants are successful in my zone.

A bird was peeking in the top of one of the bottles today. I didn't see any bugs, bird must have been curious or thirsty.
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 12, 2010
10:34 PM

Post #7456387

I need to get my butt in gear and get my containers rinsed out and ready. Mostly 2 liter bottles since I have a dedicated Coke drinker in the house. What are you guys using? How are you cutting them up?

ps--Summerhill's 2010 seeds are up

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 12, 2010
10:42 PM

Post #7456413

grrrrrl -- I started a thread on 2 ltr bottles, i put up photos on how i cut them.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2010
1:12 PM

Post #7457752

I'll be checking that thread out too:)

I got my email from Summerhill and looked at the new stuff---I want more petunias! I won't ever buy petunias but I fall so in love with the catalog photos:lol:

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 13, 2010
2:08 PM

Post #7457884

one can never have too many petunias.. but I would never winter sow them outside.. they take too long

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

January 13, 2010
10:34 PM

Post #7459252

onewish---Do you start your petunias on a heat mat?
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 13, 2010
10:42 PM

Post #7459272

I was thinking about that. Others say they've had good luck with WS petunias but i wonder when they bloom. I want at least some if them to bloom ASAP, so maybe I'll start some inside and some outside.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
12:44 AM

Post #7459665

I've never found that. Petunias have done very well for me. They sprout at pretty low temps, tolerate frost after sprouting early, and start blooming early. I'd rather WS them. I start a very few seeds inside, but not petunias.

Karen
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
12:44 AM

Post #7459666

How easy are Petunias to start inside? Do you start them 6 or 8 weeks before the last frost date?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
12:56 AM

Post #7459695

I found a picture. These petunias were WSown last year. Picture is dated June 15, looks like it had probably been blooming for a week or two and weather was cold last spring. I don't have an earlier picture.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
1:02 AM

Post #7459709

Excellent! You have convinced me--they are all starting outside. So far, only coleus and pelargonium are starting inside.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
1:08 AM

Post #7459736

diamond, I have never tried winter sowing. And, I would never try petunias. The seeds are too expensive to take chances with them. I plant mine inside. I have been planting mine too early. Our last frost date is supposedly the end of May, but you never know.

This year I will start mine about mid March. I have almost 100% germination, however I did have problems with Parks Italian seeds a couple of years ago so I emailed them and they replaced the seed.

Sometimes I use heat mats and other times I don't. I think they do germinate faster with it. But you don't need that if you start them early enough. The trick is to not let them dry out.

There are 2 ways to start them. Individually, one seed in each small pot, if I do this I use 6 packs, or sprinkle them all in 6" pot, cottage cheese container, or something like that. (a foil square cake pan in a gallon ziplock bag works real well too) But you have to pot them then when they get 2 leaves.

One more secret to petunias, is potting up. I do this 3 times before they go outside. And, the last secret to them, is pinching out the middle leaves. I do this several times before planting out, using tweezers. Each time they put out new shoots I pinch the center leaves.

This makes for real full plants.

This is what I do, and others probably do it different. Whatever works

Jeanette
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
1:10 AM

Post #7459741

Mine go from milk jug to ground. No potting up.

Karen
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
1:12 AM

Post #7459745

gg, lol, looks like we cross posted. All 3 of us. Kqcrna, you and I. Let us know how yours turn out wintersowing.

Jeanette
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
1:14 AM

Post #7459751

They would need all the potting up if you are putting them in the ground. I only put mine in planter boxes or containers of some kind.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
1:27 AM

Post #7459789

None were potted up. Here are some in hanging baskets, June 2.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
1:32 AM

Post #7459812

Ok I want to WS lobelia, petunias, zinnias, coleus and marigolds this year. I have some snowball marigolds that I think are going to be really cute! WS the tender annuals for zone 5a should happen at the same time if you were starting them inside 6 - 8 weeks before the last frost date? And if we get a 32 degree night then we cover them...correct?

This message was edited Jan 13, 2010 8:38 PM
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
1:34 AM

Post #7459815

Jnette: For the sake of experimentation, when you sow your petunias inside, why not stick a few seeds in a milk jug outside and compare results? I think you'd be surprised.

Karen
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
1:40 AM

Post #7459841

diamond: my last frost is usually in early May but I don't sow most of my tender ones until around the beginning of April. They tend to sprout fast . I do cover them for frost after they sprout. Petunias are an exception, they can take a little frost, they're not all that tender. I'll do those in winter sometimes.

The pics I posted above are Laura Bush petunias. If you like reseeders, these are for you.

Here are some WSown ones in Sept '08.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
1:43 AM

Post #7459851

A patch of volunteers from those above, July '09

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
3:59 AM

Post #7460182

Ok Karen, I'm game. What do I do with the milk jug? Cut it off and?? I have to tell you I tried winter sowing sweet peas a couple of years ago. Out of 3 flats I got about a half a dozen to germinate.

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 14, 2010
4:09 AM

Post #7460203

I never used a heat mat for my petunias ... maybe I would have better germination with one
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
4:27 AM

Post #7460238

Where are you growing them? If in your house, what is the temp?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
4:36 AM

Post #7460261

Where are you growing them? If in your house, what is the temp?

Oh, by the way Karen, I realize this is the winter sowing thread, just happened by earlier and saw someone asking about growing petunias.

I really was interested in it like I said, a couple years ago my sister and a friend and I all tried it. We all wanted to do it. I don't remember how theirs turned out, but they aren't doing any now either.

All of the sweet peas I lost were the expensive ones in T&M. That is why I didn't want to lose my petunia seeds.

But, I will certainly try a few of the petunias and I am sure I will remember to do it, and will write and ask you what to do. I have the framework for 2 shelving units with the zippered plastic covers which I bought to harden my plants off on my deck in the spring. I am game for this.

Jeanette
LynnPhillips
Buckley, WA
(Zone 7b)

January 14, 2010
6:08 AM

Post #7460491

Jnette, I can send you some of my petunia seeds that I saved from my garden. I got them all mixed up, so not sure of the color, or if they will come true, but heck it is worth it for your experiment. I am going to try w/s my petunias and also start some in the GH on a heat mat.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
6:50 AM

Post #7460565

Lynn, thanks, but I have plenty of petunia seeds. I just could not see wasting them when I have not had any luck winter sowing in the past. No, I really appreciate the offer tho. Maybe I could send you some since you aren't sure what you have?

I see Swollowtail has good prices too. Their petunias are probably the best prices I have seen for the most in a pack, and some that I haven't seen before. Also, 2/3 of them are pelleted.

I think T&M just saw that a lot of us were buying from Value Seeds so upped their prices. That always tics me off. Because they cut down on the amount of seeds and also the packaging to sell under VS name.

Oh well.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
1:00 PM

Post #7460791

Atta girl, Jnette! Be adventurous.

"I have the framework for 2 shelving units with the zippered plastic covers which I bought to harden my plants off on my deck in the spring. I am game for this." Some people do WS in those things but it's not what I'd advise. I'd put 'em in a jug and stick them out in the elements where Mother Nature will do the work for you like watering and providing sunshine. The rules are few, and given half a chance, WSing really does work. These are wintersown.

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 14, 2010
1:30 PM

Post #7460855

Jnette they will be growing in the house the room is usually around 65 - 70.. once all the lights go on it can get pretty warm in there though
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
2:18 PM

Post #7460997

Jnette, I do hope you got some Petunias in the Summerhill coop...

I have one of those patio greenhouses, I'm going to use it to sow stuff outside in spring that I want to do in cow pots (ornamental corn and millet--better direct sowed but the chips and squirrels find them too delicious). I guess that would be very late winter sowing. Plus to harden off coleus and pels.

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 14, 2010
2:42 PM

Post #7461087

make sure the cow pots don't get too wet.. I tried doing some cuttings in them last year and I guess it was too moist in the tray with the dome on.. they started growing some funky mold on the outside of them... was spraying h2o2 to get rid of it.. but all ended well
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
3:04 PM

Post #7461172

Ew. I'll water with h2o2 just in case. They should be ok, I'm gonna put them in a flat in the mini greenhouse, which I can leave partly unzipped. They just need to be in there until they're big enough the chipzilla won't bother them. Maybe I can leave the sunflowers in there long enough they won't be as attractive to the bunnies. They seem to prefer them young and tender.

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 14, 2010
3:15 PM

Post #7461210

I have resorted to leaving my sunflowers in containers on my deck... tired of those critters eating them.. must be enough yorkie smell to keep them away from there.. my honey would love the 12 footers but not going to happen unless we get some big containers
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2010
5:16 PM

Post #7461526

Karen, are those sowed direct? Surely you didn't plant each one individually!! I don't know if they should be out in our elements all winter. When we get snow it turns to ice and then it snows again on top of that and that turns to ice, etc. keeps that up all winter.

I hadn't planned on putting them in the framework right off. But, don't know about leaving them out all winter. Maybe they would get too hot in the plastic tho.; It would be in the sun. Our sun is not like yours. Especially this time of year.

Our winter goes thru March. However, this winter it is so mild, unbelievable. I have never seen one like it. The midwest is getting all of our snow.

One wish, if it is that warm I wouldn't think they would need heat mats.

Yes, gg, I did get petunias from the coop.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2010
9:16 PM

Post #7462080

Jnette: Most of those were sown in milk jugs. Initially I started the larkspur that way too, but now they volunteer reliably. Those seeds usually sprout in fall, then winter over as tiny seedlings in my flower beds with no protection. They are hardy annuals and take winter weather just fine. My flower beds had a solid blanket of them , an inch or two tall, as winter set in. We've had snow on the ground and single digit temps for weeks so I can't see anything but white now.

Milk jugs won't overheat if they have good ventilation. Don't use the screw-on lids. Those flowers get there start in life here, naturally. It's easy if you let it be.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2010
5:57 PM

Post #7464552

I was so sure that all the Ruds were perennials, that I WSed a couple different varieties. I was just checking the Parks seeds catalog. A couple of the types are listed as annuals. I WSed all my beloved Cherry Brandy seeds! DG has them listed as annuals but says they can be sown in the fall? Is this the same deal with morning glory (annuals but self-seed like weeds)?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 15, 2010
6:10 PM

Post #7464571

Diamond - most that would be annuals are probably heavy reseeders, so they would reseed themselves and you'd have them every year.
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 15, 2010
6:17 PM

Post #7464582

IIRC, the info on the little Toto's I planted said they may or may not come back for a second year. They were still looking good when they got covered with snow, so i believe it.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2010
6:24 PM

Post #7464593

TC, you WSed Cherry Brandy didn't you? We are in the same zone, so if they worked out okay for you, then they should work out for me.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 15, 2010
6:40 PM

Post #7464638

I think that was Karen... I dont have Cherry Brandy. or she bought it... i recall she wasn't pleased early on... I'll find the thread.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 15, 2010
6:41 PM

Post #7464641

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1008949/

yes, it does seem she WS'ed hers.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2010
6:56 PM

Post #7464682

I'm sorry! Karne is in a different zone but she's very close, just a little south of me. I'm praying WSing cherry Brandy works here. I wanted the seeds for so long but didn't even think to make sure they were perennials that could be WS here. I was so sure they were.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 15, 2010
7:04 PM

Post #7464696

Hi Diamond...Cherry Brandy should work well for you, we're 5b, and they grew very well.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2010
7:05 PM

Post #7464700

Whew! Thank you Celene!
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2010
7:21 PM

Post #7464736

Yes, mine were wintersowed. In fact, my cherry brandy were my first sprouts of the year. Be prepared, they're pretty darned ugly when they first open. As each blossom matures, it turns a pretty burgundy.

Rud hirta is a perfect candidate for wintersowing. Most of mine last 2 years. I have to take a walk around the yard (when it dries out some- It's a swamp now from snow melt). By late Jan or early Feb I can tell which are going to make it through winter and know how many to sow. If not killed off they stay green in winter.

Karen
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2010
7:27 PM

Post #7464752

Thank you so much, you all are life savers! Could you feel the panic through the net? I'm really trying to plan my garden out while I'm WSing. While looking at the Parks catalog, I want to order more seeds (annuals) to have some color this year. I know most of my WSers won't bloom the this year.
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 15, 2010
7:33 PM

Post #7464772

I want to order more seeds 'cause...well...no good reason, really...
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2010
9:18 PM

Post #7465041

I agree, I wanna order more seeds for the same reason. LoL I'm sure I will find a place for the plants or maybe it will be a reason to make room!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 15, 2010
11:41 PM

Post #7465428

LOL, it's a disease gg. I bought quite a few from Summerhill. I bought grass seeds from 2 others last fall. And I still want to buy more seeds. A sickness for sure.

Jeanette
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 16, 2010
12:05 AM

Post #7465474

And everyone's coming out with their new for 2010 seeds. Since I have no will power, I guess it's better than being addicted to baking or something.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 16, 2010
12:43 AM

Post #7465557

I just got my seed swap box in the mail yesterday... sorted and cataloged seeds all evening. Got a lot of good ones. Should do some sowing ... ooooh, tomorrow it out, have plans... maybe Sunday -- if not, monday.
toofewanimals
Trenton, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 17, 2010
12:51 PM

Post #7469467

kqcrna Karen - Thank you for saying the Cherry Brandy Rud. is kind of ugly when it starts to bloom! I thought that myself, almost pulled them out. I didn't think they were all that special when they did bloom. I like the bigger bloom - red and yellow Ruds I get from volunteer seeds. And your right about the Ruds being a perfect WS seed. I get tons of volunteers in the garden each year, dig them up and give they to friends.
Here is a picture of one of my fav. volunteer Ruds.

Thumbnail by toofewanimals
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2010
1:32 PM

Post #7469534

OOh, very pretty.

Karen
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2010
3:18 PM

Post #7469753

TooFew,

That is a beautiful flower! When you say "volunteer" does that mean this flower just came up on its own? What other ruds do you have planted close by?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 17, 2010
3:53 PM

Post #7469852

So, let me ask you all, my last frost date is the end of May. I normally start my seeds inside in March. So to winter sow I am assuming I have to start them earlier than I would for inside, but how much earlier?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 17, 2010
3:55 PM

Post #7469862

yes -- that is what volunteer means. with annuals, it's from fallen seeds.


I'm hoping to get a lot of Rud volunteers this year. Many of the seed heads I just crumbled around the existing plants.. hoping to get a lot more this year. we shall see.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 17, 2010
3:58 PM

Post #7469881

I think maybe what diamond is getting at is cross pollination to get that flower that was posted.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2010
4:03 PM

Post #7469899

Jnette: Perennials and hardy annuals (like poppies, bachelor buttons, larkspur) sow in winter. Just best to wait for tender annuals and tender perennials (things that won't tolerate frost) closer to spring. For me, that's late March or April. I would guess for you the timing should be about the same. I watch the weather forecast and if it's too stay above freezing for the foreseeable future, day and night, I'll sow the tenders.

The problem is that those tender ones can sprout in an early warm spell, then freeze and bolt when the cold weather returns. If that's going to be the case for me I just give those extra protection overnight for the frost, like throw a sheet or towel over those jugs.

Karen
toofewanimals
Trenton, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 17, 2010
6:02 PM

Post #7470259

Diamond, I've planted a variety of Ruds in that area. Usually plant a couple of named ones each year ... ie. Cherry Brandy last year, and just let some of the volunteers grow. I've grown Irish Eyes, Indian Summer, Cherokee Sunset, Autumn, Toto, and Prairie Sun, all in that area. I saved seeds from the pictured volunteer and it's babies didn't have any of the red, they were brown and yellow and were taller. That voluteer was very short, about 1 ft in ht. I actually start a couple of my named Rudbeckia seeds inside each year cause it is only a couple of seeds for me, I don't WS them.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2010
9:46 PM

Post #7470793

I've fallen in love with the Ruds. According to what I've read the Ruds are short lived perennials but if they self seed, it seems they would always reproduce???

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 17, 2010
9:47 PM

Post #7470796

diamond... do you have seeds??

I know i have a ton [OK small baggies of them] they are NoID's but they are all from my garden.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2010
10:38 PM

Post #7470901

Yes I have some Rud seeds. I really like the Cherry Brandy. I have some of the Irish Eyes, Tiger Eyes, Cappucino and the Black Eyed. Would you like some of the varieties I have? I may have a couple of others I will have to check my stash to be sure. What kind/colors do you have TC?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 17, 2010
10:48 PM

Post #7470932

Ok, be careful what you wish for...Zone 9a needs to get in gear!

BTW, all these are Veggie Seeds. Will start the flower seeds tomorrow...

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 17, 2010
11:19 PM

Post #7471009

mine were these... and the yellow ones...

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 17, 2010
11:21 PM

Post #7471019

and these... but i do not have the seeds separated... I just collected heads and they all went in the same baggie.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 18, 2010
12:13 AM

Post #7471180

Those look like the Cappucino and the Irish Eyes. Those are beautiful! Did they bloom the first year? I think the Cherry Brandy are supposed to bloom the first year and stay under 2 ft don't they? How tall are those Ruds?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
12:19 AM

Post #7471197

Um, those Rudbeckias are waaaaaaaaaaaaay cool. TCS, if you're offering the mixed up seeds, I'd sure be willing to receive some for my tropical plant patio. Since I grow in containers, it'd be easy for me to separate the seeds after the plants bloom.

Now, ya'll say these don't bloom the 1st year? I have to wait until NEXT spring before I get these lovely flowers?

Ok.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
12:25 AM

Post #7471216

according to my spreadsheet... one is "Indian Summer" and "Black Eyed Susan"

I dont think it's Cappuccino, as last year i attempted to ID it, and there was such a variety in the coloring... it was hard to pin down.

All of mine bloomed first year. I think they are short lived Perennials. and most were tall... 24-30"
I had a small clump that was along my chain link fence... it was short... 9-12" maybe. it was really pretty though [i'll look for an image on the other computer] but i did not collect seeds... just crunched the seed heads onto the ground.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
12:31 AM

Post #7471231

you got it Linda. you wouldnt happen to have any Larkspur, would you??

This message was edited Jan 17, 2010 6:33 PM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 18, 2010
12:45 AM

Post #7471269

Have any of you planted Cherry Brandy Rud from seed collected from your own plants? And if so, what did they look like? Do these come up from the same plant the next year? They sure do take a long time being ugly before looking good. Makes you want to put a sack over their heads. I was so disappointed in them. I collected some seed and will try again.

I have some Maya Rud seeds if any of you want some. Now those are really neat ones. Look like the Teddy Bear Sunflowers only smaller and they last for a long time. Right up until the rain did them in. I have had the same plant growing for about 4 years now.

Jeanette

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
12:49 AM

Post #7471279

TC,
No, sorry, I don't. I've mostly grown veggies.

This spring will be my very first attempt at growing flowers on any real scale, since I sowed marigold seeds in our front porch flowerbed years ago in my teens. And nobody could safely sit on the front porch the whole summer. Who knew the bees love marigolds???

But, they sure were pretty! So pretty that, even though my mother was pretty mad about the bees, she didn't demand that I pull up the pretty blooms!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
12:51 AM

Post #7471284

Jnette,
You got a pic of the Maya Rud?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 18, 2010
12:59 AM

Post #7471313

No gg I don't. Sorry.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 18, 2010
1:02 AM

Post #7471329

I would love some Maya Ruds. I have some other varieties if you're intersted in a trade.

TC, I have some Larkspur. I can put them in the mail tomorrow. I cannot remember the color. There are such a wide variety of colors in Ruds. I cannot keep up! LoL all I know is that I like them all!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
1:27 AM

Post #7471413

here were the smaller ones aside my fence.

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
1:29 AM

Post #7471419

Diamond... here is my spreadsheet... see if there is anything you'd like for those Larkspur.

my Haves list isn't completely up to date.. but you can check that too.
http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0Avcsp97ckJSUcEZ2ZmZPZUhQc1RxeEEzc29TQzNpYUE&hl=en
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 18, 2010
3:13 AM

Post #7471712

Dmail me your address diamond and I will put some in the mail.

Jeanette

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 18, 2010
12:51 PM

Post #7472492

here is a cherry brandy I ws last year.. not sure if they were commercial seed or collected from the person I received them from.. it was still small in sept when I took this photo

Thumbnail by onewish1
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 18, 2010
2:38 PM

Post #7472727

Terese, I have your seeds packaged up and ready for the mail. At the very latest I will have them in the mail tomorrow.


Jnette, thanks for the offer of the Maya Ruds. I have a list of seeds I can share with you. What are you looking for?

I will be working in H & G show selling seeds next month. If there are any seeds that you all are having a hard time finding, send me a dmail and I will be on the lookout for you.

Gymgirl, heres a pic of the Maya Rud from this site.




Thumbnail by diamond9192002
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
2:40 PM

Post #7472735

thanks Diamond... is there anything you want in return?
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 18, 2010
2:48 PM

Post #7472752

No thank you, Terese. I checked you want list to see if I could surprise you with a little something extra but I didn't have any of the seeds on your want list. Are you looking for anything that's not listed on your want list?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
3:02 PM

Post #7472786

i dont have a lot of wants... most are hostas... which i will probably end up buying.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 18, 2010
4:57 PM

Post #7473055

diamond, I just thought of something I have always wanted but keep forgetting to order when I get seeds, and that is lisianthus. I would love to have some if you have seeds.

And, yes diamond that is my Maya. The flowers on it last clear up until the rain or frost destroys the flowers. I don't think I have ever seen them lose their petals. Also, the same plant has been growing for about 4 years now.



diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 18, 2010
5:14 PM

Post #7473120

Jnette,

I will check my seeds stash. that one doesn't sound familiar. I had to look it up and Lisianthus is a beautiful flower. I will be work the Home and Garden show seed counter. I will keep an eye out for that one. I reminds me of a mix between a poppy and a rose. LoL

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
5:18 PM

Post #7473135

I know everyeone's been talking aobut them on the CG thread.

LeBug offered me some a while back, but since they are not hardy to my zone, i turned her down. They are quite beautiful though.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 18, 2010
6:36 PM

Post #7473407

LOL, maybe I need to go to Lea. No, but if I only grew perennials then I wouldn't have the color I am looking for.

Jeanette
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 18, 2010
11:31 PM

Post #7474281

Anyone ever ws Belamcanda chinensis (chinese tiger lily, balckberry lily)?
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 18, 2010
11:35 PM

Post #7474299

I'm going to try with some seeds I collected from mine ('Hello Yello'), I don't know if they come true from seed, i kinda hope they don't.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 18, 2010
11:44 PM

Post #7474332

I put a jug out last night. I have a few lilies I want to try but a couple are not perennials for zone 5, so I will have to wait until spring for those.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 19, 2010
12:55 AM

Post #7474549

Diamond... I just got some of the Blackberry lily seeds. It's not a seed I would have requested... but i will try them.

and odd name, as i've read they are orange blooms.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 19, 2010
2:04 AM

Post #7474756

LoL I thought the EXACT same thing! I read that they produce seeds that look like blackberries. I was surprised that those are perennials in zone 5 The fans remind me of Irises. Sounds like they're easy to grow from seed. Usually easy for some means difficult for me. LoL
grrrlgeek
Grayslake, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 20, 2010
1:27 AM

Post #7477687

They're in the same family as irises. Here's what they look like when they go to seed.

edit: dummy me, I dried the seeds with the fruit still on. They're soaking as we speak.

This message was edited Jan 19, 2010 7:30 PM

Thumbnail by grrrlgeek
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 20, 2010
12:52 PM

Post #7478757

I'm usually more interested in plant with larger flowers but the Blackberry Lily caught my eye for some reason. Are you soaking them before you WS?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 20, 2010
1:38 PM

Post #7478845

Diamond... i have no clue. I know i got a baggie of them, but i haven't gone past that point. Maybe i'll dig them out today and take a peek at them.

I wont soak them. My first year WS'ing, i followed some directions for thicker seeds, and soaked them, just like i was told... they all rotted. The WS process [mother nature] will take care of the thick seeds coat with the freeze and thaw cycles... the way i understand it ... they say to soak and or nick, to soften/break thru the coat.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 20, 2010
3:34 PM

Post #7479110

Ok, I wondered about that. LoL I worry the entire time I have seeds germinating. Until I see some green, I am fretting over them as though they are my kids. LoL

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 20, 2010
4:35 PM

Post #7479294

TC,
Just put em' in the growing medium and let em go!

Karen's made a believer outta me!

"It you plant it, it will grow!"

[Famous line to a gardener trying to grow an airplant. Not to be confused with a line from a famous move about a guy trying to grow a baseball in a cornfield.]
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 27, 2010
1:35 AM

Post #7500521

This is my first year WS and started a few jugs about 10 days ago when we had a mini false Spring and it was warm enough I could be outside without chattering my teeth.

So far I've planted Hollyhocks, Formosan Lily, Catchfly, Red Lupine, Swiss Giant Pansy, Blackberry Lily, Purple Foxglove, Coreopsis, Spirea, Allium, Penstemon, Butterfly Bush, Heuchera, Agastache, Liatris, Catnip, Cleome, Helianthus, Campanula, Bee Balm, and Snow in Summer. That's the majority off the top of my head. I'm keeping a spreadsheet and leaving the rest up to Mother Nature.

Next month I'm planning to sow more, still saving jugs.

I had also saved a few of those rotisserie chicken containers and used them too. They sure look like min-greenhouses to me. Anybody else using those or have used them? Just curious if they're as good as jugs?



klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2010
1:49 AM

Post #7500566

I used some of those last year. They seemed to work OK. Hard to tell, more of my failures happened in those, but not sure if that was the container or the particular seeds that ended up in them. Not as much room for soil in the bottom, and mine were all bumpy on the bottom, so a pain to cut drainage in. I'd imagine they'll be fine though! I've also used the large lettuce containers from Sams. They're basically huge shoe boxes of clear plastic. They worked really well.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 27, 2010
1:53 AM

Post #7500575

i too used one, once... i found them too shallow. the roots really have no where to go... I'd think if they were using for some thing that will get planted quickly it would work... though i do have to say... i did get germination and i think they survived.

i'll have to check my images to see if i have one of that.
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 27, 2010
2:19 AM

Post #7500651

Thanks for the input. I only used 2 and wondered about their shallow bottoms, plus you're right kl...they are a pain to drill and pretty flimsy. I'll check tomorrow to see what's planted in mine, maybe I'll get lucky. That's really how I feel about the whole shebang since I've never done this before. tsc, pics of yours would be great, hope you can also let me know what you had planted.
klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2010
2:53 AM

Post #7500760

Can't remember if anyone mentioned it here... or somewhere else. But someone said they used a glue gun to melt holes in their milk jugs. I tried it yesterday for the first time (not a glue gun girl, so happy to find another use for the one in the closet!) and it worked great! I was seriously concerned that I was going to lose a finger last year from all the box cutter use. This worked great on the milk jugs, just had to burn a few extra since they are so small (tiny glue gun). Didn't work on the clear 2 liter type plastic, but I'll take it!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 27, 2010
3:02 AM

Post #7500777

Kelly -- Lea told me about the glue gun. I too found it did not work on 2 ltr.
LynnPhillips
Buckley, WA
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2010
3:36 AM

Post #7500857

Last year I 'Borrowed" DH's old soldering gun. It worked great, even on the 2 litre and the juice bottles.

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 27, 2010
3:41 AM

Post #7500877

now that's a tip I like... thanks!!!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 27, 2010
4:05 AM

Post #7500920

Heat up a phillips screwdriver on your stove burner. It'll burn through concrete...
toofewanimals
Trenton, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 27, 2010
10:22 AM

Post #7501304

I use a shish kabob skewer heated on the stove. Works great for all typed of bottles.

Oh, and it doesn't get hot at the end your holding if you were wondering.

This message was edited Jan 27, 2010 5:25 AM
JanieP
Jacksonville, AR

January 27, 2010
2:35 PM

Post #7501774

Glad to see you winter sowers from zone 7 on here. Last year was my first year and wasnt really that pleased with the results. Think I made all the newbie mistakes-not enough holes, panic when it rained so much and moved them under a carport and didnt move them back out quick enough, impatience, etc. Have kept up with all the winter sowing threads, and got some really good information and encouragement. I am going to try again, I will succeed!! Seems like most of the gardeners are from every zone but zone 7. So zone 7 gardeners, what is your favorite plants(s) to winter sow and when do you start your winter sowing?

Thanks,
Janie
klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2010
2:54 PM

Post #7501830

Starting now, will probably continue until late February, or whenever I finally collect enough jugs! My best successes last year (my first year) were Echinacea, Foxglove, Penstemon, Poppies, Helenium, Campanula glomerata, Liatris, Cleome. I'm going to direct sow the poppies this year. I didn't have any trouble transplanting, but so many came up that I'm looking for time savings now!

Oh! Had to get back on the computer to add Columbine! How could I have forgotten them?! They did fantastic, and I have lot of little plants all over my yard that I'm expecting to bloom this year.

This message was edited Jan 27, 2010 10:09 AM
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 27, 2010
10:54 PM

Post #7503230

Chiming in on the rotisserie containers--maybe if you were planting shallow rooted stuff say--moss rose, alyssum or lobelia--those might be OK depth wise.
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 27, 2010
11:45 PM

Post #7503381

Oh good, another Zone 7a gardener, you're just down the road from me, dmac. Those two containers have Cleomes and Coreopsis. Am I in trouble or will those be OK?
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 28, 2010
1:17 AM

Post #7503635

Cleomes are pretty big plants so I'm thinking they'd accordingly have a bigger root system--so maybe a deeper container.
Which coreopsis? Some are shorter and smaller than other varieties...plus you gotta think about how long you may leave them in the sowing containers. I've seen photos and posts from the WS junkies showing their plants still in their sowing containers well into the summer and early fall:lol:
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 28, 2010
1:26 AM

Post #7503657

It's not only limited root space that's a problem with shallow containers. They also don't hold a whole lot of moisture with could be a problem, too.

Karen
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 28, 2010
1:33 AM

Post #7503680

True--I'm new at this for this season as well and even though I see alot of success stories using some of the shallower planting containers--I'm going to stick with the 2L and gal. jugs--more seedlings than I'll ever need but neighbors and friends benefit from my excesses:lol: Always listen to Karen---I've picked up that tidbit from hanging around these threads:)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 28, 2010
2:01 AM

Post #7503774

I love the soldering iron for poking holes in pots, I figured this out long before I started WS, I did it for gesneriad cuttings that I was rooting.

For those of you with poppy experience, what do you do? I tried one container last year, they were lackluster. These are annual poppies, and they don't like the root system disturbed...what's the best way to do these?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 28, 2010
2:13 AM

Post #7503813

plant them when they are quite small. i have never had a problem with them. If i do a small container of them, ,the whole clump goes in the ground... if it is a gallon jug, i split it into quarters.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 28, 2010
2:26 PM

Post #7504891

Perfect! Thank you! When you say "small", how small? One set of true leaves? Two??
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 28, 2010
4:14 PM

Post #7505266

Coreopsis lanceolata and Coreopsis "Rising Sun" are the two I'm trying.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 28, 2010
4:18 PM

Post #7505280

Celene... honestly, i dont think i ever noticed the leaves.

Poppies can still handle some cold weather... I think i did it once i had 'a chia-pet' of a container [lots of seedlings] and i was able to work with the soil. Early-Mid April for me.

I think Karen [zone6] stated she can plant poppies around end of March.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 28, 2010
11:28 PM

Post #7506550

Yes, temp doesn't matter at all. Poppies like the cold. Just plant them when small, maybe a couple of true leaves. They'll be tiny at that point.

Karen
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 28, 2010
11:51 PM

Post #7506632

tcs, I am zone 5 also. If I direct sow poppies, when do you think would be the best time? Same as WS?

Jeanette

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 29, 2010
1:07 AM

Post #7506884

I can't recall if i ever direct sown them. if i did, i would probably do it end of March... if the soil was 'soft'... i'd loosen it up a but and sprinkle them. Hopefully the critters wont eat them. though they are teeny tiny.

But - i would think you could direct sow them any time... and they would germinate when the conditions were right.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 29, 2010
1:41 AM

Post #7507008

Thanks. I think they need stratification, so I suppose any time before the last frost. Thanks again.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 29, 2010
1:59 AM

Post #7507056

Thanks! I'll let you know how the poppies do. That's a real pipe dream today, it's eight degrees.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 29, 2010
2:13 AM

Post #7507119

We had that for almost 2 months and now it is in the mid 40s during the day. I love this winter!!! I will take the cold any time if we don't have snow.
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 29, 2010
3:08 AM

Post #7507320

I've read about folks in warmer zones direct sowing poppy seeds in December. Sorta makes me wish I lived in a warmer climate again. I'm in Zone 7A and had planned to wait til March or April. Out last frost won't be til early or mid May. Would that be about the right time? Or could I go ahead and WS them?

8" of the fluffy stuff's expected here tomorrow into Saturday. I can't wait for Spring.
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 29, 2010
8:44 AM

Post #7507897

I have a tip for anyone using a soldering iron, especially a "borrowed" one.

Wipe the tip well with steel wool before returning it to the toolbox. The plastic can burn on the iron and you can smell it burning the next time you use it. Be careful not to burn yourself on either the steel wool or the soldering iron. I put on my kitchen mitts, held the steel wool down in the steel sink with one hand and wiggled the soldering iron around with the other. I let the iron sit all day and turned it on again. It didn't smell any more.

There are several things that need soldering (including the cord to my outdoor lights that were hit with a shovel). I don't want to explain why the soldering iron smells like burning plastic.

The bf says that my tools cringe when I open the toolbox.
toofewanimals
Trenton, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 29, 2010
10:09 AM

Post #7507937

Jeanette, I don't know how much snow you get, but here near Detroit,MI we hardly get any, most of the winter is without snowcover ... we are just cold most of the time. And we always say 'if we have the cold, at least we could have the beautiful snow to go with it ... not toooo much though!' lol
And its worse for the plants to not have the snowcover. I'm actually in zone 6a, it rarely gets below -10 here, but most of our weather puts us in zone 5b.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 30, 2010
1:44 AM

Post #7510566

LOL, 2few, you have to have the clouds for snow and normally you won't have clouds at -10 because the clouds hold the warmth in (warmth, lol) i.e. if the clouds are holding the warmth in, then it won't be -10.

Cheer up, if it warms up, you might get snow. Yes, the snow will insulate the plants, but it sure would be nice to get it before we get so cold the ground freezes. Oh well, who ever said we could pick our weather?

Jeanette
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 30, 2010
3:12 AM

Post #7510820

Thanks for the tips on petunias. This year I threw some seeds in the garden and a few came up. They took a while to get blooming. I will have to start them inside or baby them a bit more next year.
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 31, 2010
1:43 AM

Post #7513815

We ended up with 11" of snow, it's so light and fluffy the wind blew it around every which way and made pretty drifts. I used a paint pen on duct tape to write the name of the seeds and taped them to the front of each jug, can't see them but they're under there somewhere.

Thumbnail by FruitOfTheVine
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 31, 2010
2:05 AM

Post #7513879

FOV.

I have never done Winter Sowing before and I notice you have left the lids on your bottles. I thought they were suppose to be off so they could be watered "naturally". How do they get water if you do that? And if you have the lid on why do you need drainage holes?

I was just getting ready to plant some myself tomorrow but don't want to do this wrong.

Jeanette

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 31, 2010
1:39 PM

Post #7514795

By leaving the caps off, the snow would get in side and naturally 'water' the seeds... of course when everything melts/thaws.

Looks real pretty though. I dont mind the snow... it's the COLD i can do without.
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 31, 2010
3:34 PM

Post #7515044

I can do without the cold too, it gets more difficult on my bones and mood as each Winter passes.

Last week the tops were off when we got over 2" of rain, you can see some of the weep holes I also drilled around the shoulders. Like I mentioned, this is my first time trying and was concerned after so much rain and all this snow when it melts that my seeds would wash. If you tell me to run out there and remove the tops I will...lol I want good results come Spring and am trying to avoid buying perennials. Hope to have enough to plant and also share with friends and neighbors. Please somebody help if I'm doing this wrong!?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 31, 2010
4:05 PM

Post #7515140

As long as you have the holes drilled they'll probably be OK. I'd remove them, though. I have never, ever used caps on the jugs and get good results. Remember, the less air flow, the less opportunity for excess moisture to evaporate too. Lots of air is good. As long as you have good drainage there's no problem. No rush to dig out of 11" of snow to remove them immediately, but I'd remove them after the snow melts and weather is better (for you, not the plants).

If it seems they're too wet, you can poke more drainage holes.

Karen
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 31, 2010
4:38 PM

Post #7515266

Thanks Karen, much appreciated.
Susan
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 31, 2010
6:05 PM

Post #7515525

So, what I am hearing you say, is that when I put mine out, to leave the lids off. Drainage is the main thing.

LOL, Susan, (I like that better) I don't want to do this wrong either. Growing plants either way is too much work not to have good results.

Jeanette
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 31, 2010
9:53 PM

Post #7516307

Yes, Jnette. You want something with a top to form a sort of roof. But no screw on cap on milk jugs or 2 liters. Others might do it differently but that's how the seasoned veterans, including Trudi, advised when I was starting the first time. I've always done it that way and it has worked well.

I throw away screw on caps immediately when I get a jug. It only serves to make the jug smell awful.

Karen
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

January 31, 2010
9:57 PM

Post #7516316

Dont throw away your caps Karen. After you get a lot of them, spray paint them with outdoor paint & use them for walkways, edging, tree base covers, etc. Works great. :) Oops, you use milk jugs, I don't know how their caps will work, but the screw caps on 2 liters do good.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

February 1, 2010
12:02 AM

Post #7516688

recycle, recycle. Huh!! Whatever works. Think there is always a use for everything. Just have to use our imaginations.

Thanks for the info Karen.

Jeanette
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 1, 2010
12:18 AM

Post #7516743

Debbie, you're a worse packrat than I am...lol
It's way too much work, Jeanette, and Perennials around here aren't cheap.
I ventured out, Karen, and removed the caps I could reach without basically sinking up to my knees. The rest will be history as soon as I can reach them. I wore out my show shovel scooping mulch last year to the point the edges were rounded and had a crack in the back. Guess I need a new one...huh? Thanks again for your advice!



Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

February 1, 2010
12:53 AM

Post #7516845

Karen, so tell me, I have a gallon jug, how high do I go with the seed potting mix for the roots to grow in, and then how high to cut the container above that? I understand how the rest of the jug is head space for the things to grow so that should not matter.

I don't have a lot of containers so don't want to ruin the ones I do have.

Thanks, Jeanette
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 1, 2010
3:33 AM

Post #7517319

Use 3" to 4" of potting mix. Cut right below the handle.

Karen
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 1, 2010
1:58 PM

Post #7518226

I saw info on potting soil and posted it to another forum. It was a group of soil mixes from Cornell (my alma mater) gathered on the backyard gardener website. For seed starting they used
1/2 peat
1/4 perlite
1/4 vermiculite

Another seed starting mix claiming to be a cornell mix, with measurements:
4 quarts of shredded peat moss or sphagnum,
2 teaspoons ground limestone,
4 tablespoons 5-10-10 fertilizer.

Now, vermiculite is hard to find because it may be carcinogenic. What do you think about 2/3 peat and 1/3 vermiculite. (I have those on hand)? If the exotic seed starting mixes are more expensive than peat/perlite, I am going to shake and bake my own!

Here are some links.
Cornell's home garden homepage http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/homegardening/index.html
Cornell's Gardening Resources http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/index.html
Seed starting mixes http://www.backyardgardener.com/soil/soil5.html
Cornell mixes http://www.backyardgardener.com/soil/soil10.html
General info and soil mix recipe http://www.justrealestate.org/re/gardening/startingseedsindoors.asp

BTW, if you forget to save the link and look up dirt recipe, you get all sorts of recipes for "edible dirt" with assorted processed foods and gummy worms. I may be the only person who never heard of such a thing. However, I don't use cake mixes/cool whip/processed foods and don't have kids. I guess it would be cute for a garden club get together, but I can't imagine eating it.
klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2010
2:37 PM

Post #7518331

GardenQuilts, are you talking about for WinterSowing? If so, one of the experts here will need to speak up, but I don't think you'd want a seed starting mix for winter sowing. I've always heard it doesn't matter what you use, can use cheap soil, but I'm thinking a seed starting mix is awfully light to have outside... would dry out really fast?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

February 1, 2010
4:19 PM

Post #7518578

[quote="Jnette"] I have a gallon jug, how high do I go with the seed potting mix for the roots to grow in, and then how high to cut the container above that?

Thanks, Jeanette[/quote]

Jeanette ... i do the same as Karen... 3-4"
here is an image of one of my milk jugs.

Will be creating a new thread... gimme a min or two

Thumbnail by tcs1366
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 1, 2010
5:43 PM

Post #7518881

NEW THREAD: What Have you tried? #2

Go here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1073096/

DO NOT POST PAST THIS...
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

February 1, 2010
5:58 PM

Post #7518944

What is going on? I cross posted with Tcs on the other thread and her post looked like I was going to blow up if I did. Guess I will forget it.

Jeanette

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


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