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Handyman: Who ya gonna call . . . . ?

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Forum: HandymanReplies: 20, Views: 131
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anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 3, 2009
6:48 PM

Post #7331884

Not Ghostbusters, for sure. Who do I call to remove and replace a gas dryer? plumber or ??
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

December 3, 2009
8:35 PM

Post #7332086

Usually the place you buy the new dryer from will install it and take the old one away.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 3, 2009
9:36 PM

Post #7332324

I am buying it in Oregon and I live in Washington and will p/u ourselves to save 7% sales tax.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

December 4, 2009
1:41 PM

Post #7334268

Since it is gas, a plumber would be the first choice, if you are not able to do it yourself.

I have always replaced my own except for the last one - it was a free install from the dealer.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 4, 2009
4:44 PM

Post #7334790

Bubba, isn't it dangerous?
momcat
northeast, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 4, 2009
5:59 PM

Post #7335002

I installed my gas stove and dryer when I moved here. Not a big deal at all. There was some sort of goop ( bought it at Home Depot or Menards, in the plumbing section), I had to get to apply to the gas pipe where they joined, and then put some dish washing soap around the joint and turned on the gas. With the dish soap, it is thick enough to stay in place, but if there is a gas leak, you will be able to see the bubbles, so you can take apart and add/reapply more of the goop.

Deb
DesertPirate
Fallbrook, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 4, 2009
6:30 PM

Post #7335091

anastatia; Since you already have a gas dryer installed, it won't be a big deal at all. You'll need to turn the gas off at the valve behind your dryer, remove the flexible gas line from the old dryer. It should be a flare fitting that doesn't require the "goop" (pipe dope/thread compound) momcat referred to. Move the old dryer out and reverse the process by connecting the flex line to the new dryer, turn the gas back on, check for leaks with soap solution mentioned above, plug it in and you're done.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 4, 2009
7:24 PM

Post #7335242

Yes, this is a replacement gas dryer. I am removing my old gas dryer for a new one. thanks for the help. I have copied and printed.

Now this leads me to ask: we were given a $$huge estimate to extend our inside in the basement gas line across the ceiling about 30 ft so I could install a gas stove. The huge $ was labor because of ceiling tiles etc. Is that something for a DIY??
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 4, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #7335280

This is what my DH did. I am nervous. He did not disconnect the metal gas connecter that is connected to the internal gas line. He DID use the new brass connector that connects the gas line directly to dryer. I kept reading to NOT re use gas connector. Please clarifly.
DesertPirate
Fallbrook, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 4, 2009
8:25 PM

Post #7335402

If you have pictures it would make this much easier, however it sounds like you're talking about the flare adapter from the gas pipe to the flex. It's usually made of brass although sometimes it's galvanized (silver colored) Is that the part you're talking about?? If so, it's perfectly fine to use the one that was there already, no need to replace if there wasn't a problem before.

The company that sells/manufactures the dryers will do everything they can to protect themselves from any liability in regards to installation. While it's a good idea to replace everything you can when the old parts are questionable, it's certainly not necessary if everything was in good repair before and there's no sign of corrosion or rust.

This message was edited Dec 4, 2009 12:31 PM
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 4, 2009
9:17 PM

Post #7335518

Yes, flex pipe is the word. That stayed connected the whole time. Maybe 5 yrs old. It is the flex pipe joined to a new brass connected joined directly to dryer. He put some dish soap on it. DH is getting me a canary. :)
DesertPirate
Fallbrook, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 4, 2009
9:47 PM

Post #7335587

Re-using the flex is fine as long as it's not been a problem before. That's exactly the way I'd do it.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 4, 2009
10:04 PM

Post #7335630

thank you so very much for your assistance. my nerves have calmed and the canary is flying high!!!!
DesertPirate
Fallbrook, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 5, 2009
9:12 AM

Post #7337239

Glad I could help. Happy you're up and running.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

December 5, 2009
1:18 PM

Post #7337446

Running a gas line 30 feet should not be very expensive unledd it has to be run through every joist. That would raise the cost due to the extra labor.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 5, 2009
3:21 PM

Post #7337768

Actually it would be more like 80 ft after reconsidering the location of where the gas 'enters' our basement & turning right @ one pt. But that is 'simple' labor; the kind we can do and the gas contractor could just hook up either ends, uh? the source and the end where the gas stove would be located?
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

December 7, 2009
2:23 PM

Post #7344375

Thew would also pressure test the whole line, too. I would tackle the job myself, but be sure you follow the building code for your area - materials, installation, etc.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 7, 2009
8:23 PM

Post #7345817

UPDATE the canary is still flying
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2009
3:20 AM

Post #7347309

Along with the canary, you need to buy some of those pretty cyclamen plants. Their nickname is Gas Plant and they will die if the monoxide levels get too high. I thought that mine "just died" and did not remember that bit of trivia about them. I guess that I was too sick from monoxide poisoning to think much at all. I thank God that the furnace went out completely and DH called a licensed repairman to find out why... We were only sick and flu-ish feeling when the plants died, maybe 10 days before the furnace would not re-light. They seem to die early to give you good warning.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 8, 2009
9:54 PM

Post #7349609

Oh my word!! I have lots of smoke alarms but will put a monoxide detector? Like a carb. monoxide detector?
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2009
11:14 PM

Post #7349887

Yep! You do need a few carbon monoxide detectors. We put them in every room that had a working gas line and in the garage/workshop.

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