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Garden Talk: Anyone Making Christmas Cookies?

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 8, 2009
11:31 AM

Post #7347910

Other forums are starting a cookie thread.
DD went to a cookie exchange yesterday and came home with these.
Too cute for words.
Choc waffer(1/2 orio)
Frosting
BODY:Cherry with stem dipped in chocolate
HEAD: Hersheys large choc.drop
EARS: Slivered Almonds
EYES:Geletine frosting dots.

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saanansandy
Sue, RI
(Zone 6a)

December 8, 2009
4:09 PM

Post #7348514

Love them!! I'll be making gingerbread men this weekend.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 8, 2009
4:55 PM

Post #7348646

I love gingerbread men.I have an old reciepe that calls for a bit of cayenne pepper.
Its gone now ,when I moved.
purpleice
Bridgman, MI
(Zone 5a)

December 9, 2009
7:24 PM

Post #7352532

There is someone looking for a gingerbread man cookie recipe over in the Recipes forum, in case someone wants to help them.
Anne
willowwind
Moundridge, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
4:56 AM

Post #7354393

It's traditional here to make peppernuts or pfeffernusse so we started right after Thanksgiving. They're a spicy anise flavored cookie that came from Russia with the Mennonites. You roll the dough into long snakes and cut them into little 1/2 inch by 1/2 inch pieces. They're baked by the quart instead of the dozen. Although the kitchen smells wonderful, they need to age a few days to develop their taste. There are as many recipes as there are people around here, but Christmas wouldn't be the same in our homes without them.

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
10:41 AM

Post #7354625

Do they sometimes roll them in powdered sugar?
willowwind
Moundridge, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
1:33 PM

Post #7354825

No, haven't seen any like that...I make a bigger cookie called pecan snowballs that we roll in powdered sugar. These are, depending on the specific recipe, more of a hard, crispy little cookie. Some of the older ladies almost get into a competition to see who can make the hardest ones, which is silly because they're the ones who are having dental problems and can't eat hard food. Mostly they're served with coffee, milk for the children, so you have something to help soften anything too crunchy. My old family recipe is harder on the outside, but breaks up quite easily in your mouth. Some people put in nuts, citron or gumdrops. My grandmother always made them with citron, but I hate that stuff, so mine are just cookie.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
1:43 PM

Post #7354851

My heritage is German and my grandmother used to have a big garden.
I slipped a watermelon into my car one day and got it home and refridged it because I LOVE cold watermelon.
SURPRISE !!!! CITRON.
She used to preserve it every year to spread on toast and to use in an applesauce spice cake.
The pecan snowballs sounds like what I was thinking of.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 10, 2009
7:14 PM

Post #7355920

Willow, The last time I made Pfeffernusse, they got hard as rocks. My mom always made them, but I've lost her recipe in my move. I tried one from a magazine and they pretty much were inedible.
willowwind
Moundridge, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2009
11:09 PM

Post #7356699

Oh Stormy, some of them really are hard. That made me laugh 'cause whenever I try someone's I'm not familiar with I bite really slow 'til I get the texture. D-mail me if you'd like a recipe for some that are crunchy but leave all your teeth intact.

Ge, my grandmother-in-law, who was also german, used to make a coffee cake with watermelon syrup which she made from the rinds. I think every bit of things were used back then. She called it something like diena-kuchen. It was good, but awfully sweet to me. Guess I like my watermelon fresh rather than preserved. My father's family were Swiss, actually Amish first, then mennonite. The mennonite groups here are mostly german, who came through Russia, but there are many Swiss mixed in. LOTS of good eating in a crowd like this!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 10, 2009
11:16 PM

Post #7356721

Ooooo Zuricher Geschitzeltes mit Ruesti, Spaetzel und Smecht und Zour Rotes Kraut!!! Sar gut!
willowwind
Moundridge, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
12:33 AM

Post #7357030

I know what you're saying but can't answer back except in English. My sister could, but she lives in Austria so it would be a little different. :)
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 11, 2009
6:10 AM

Post #7357984

It's a typical swiss meal. Sauteed veal strips in a cream sauce with a special type of potato pancake and sweet & sour red Cabbage. Of course, with Spaetzel (A wonderful egg noodle type of dumpling sauteed in butter & parsley) too.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
10:46 AM

Post #7358147

We used to eat those dishes ,I just didnt know what they were called.
Fall harvest bought red cabbage dishes.
I guess anything tasts good and can be preserved of you blanch it enough and add tons of sugar.
Green Tomato Pickle relish for savory and Green Tomato Mince meat for sweet. They used every last thing left on stem or vine in those days.
willowwind
Moundridge, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
6:19 PM

Post #7359162

Heenaborscht, jreena schaubelsupp, verenika, schweinbraten mit kraut, bierocks, plumemooss, portzel, flinsen, and zwieback were all treats I grew up with and are still typically served around here anywhere you see the lable of German Buffet at a restaurant.

Translated...Chicken borscht (cabbage, chicken vegetable soup with no beets), green bean soup, cheese filled noodle pockets served with ham gravy, roast pork with kraut, hamburger- cabbage pocket in roll dough, plum soup, New Year's cookies (fried raisin fritter rolled in sugar), crepes with cherries, double mounded dinner roll. M-m-m-m-m! Some have been anglicized more and some still go by the old german title, but delicious all the same.

This message was edited Dec 11, 2009 12:25 PM
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 11, 2009
6:25 PM

Post #7359174

I once read that the Swiss eat more Pork (Schweinfleisch) per capita than any other nation.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
6:27 PM

Post #7359180

Pork and Sauerkraut is big with this house.
Served with fluffy mashed potatos
Plum Soup is something I want to try.I'll google it.
NorthEast forum had a guy whe posted his seasonal cooking on a thread.
His pics looked like Betterhomes and Martha Stwrt.
We miss him.
Found one:
http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=1120382

This message was edited Dec 11, 2009 1:32 PM
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 11, 2009
6:42 PM

Post #7359217

Thanks, GE. Getting back to the cookies, the Swiss and the Austrians also make the absolute best Pecan or Almond Crescent cookies. I'm always on the look out for good recipes for those.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
7:28 PM

Post #7359345

This is a tough season for me as a diabetic,before diabetes I loved anything pecan.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 11, 2009
7:39 PM

Post #7359366

Me too, GE. I now make very few of the cookies, but love reading about them and sampling them at other peoples' houses. When I do bake them, I'm make it a point to give a lot of them away. Except I have to hoard the Pizzelles and Biscottis as everyone seems to eat those buy the fistful.

Earlier in my life, cookie baking started in October and wasn't over until NewYears. It wasn't unusual to have 30 to 40 varieties. And then we swapped some with my cousins and a few friends.

My mom and I were big Fruitcake and Mincemeat & Raisen Pie bakers too.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
8:02 PM

Post #7359433

We had a pretty good fruitcake reciepe and made something called King 's cake,it was full of ground orangesmdates,raisins,currents nuts.
We also made Plum Puddings 6 months ahead so the alcohol would meld with everything.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 11, 2009
8:05 PM

Post #7359441

GE, I've made that King's Cake. It's a real winner. I used to marinate the Fruitcakes in Brandy & Rum for six weeks. They really packed a wallop.

Another favorite was the Irish Whiskey cake with Walnuts. I never tried the plum pudding, but should as I have a few antique molds.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
8:15 PM

Post #7359469

Yes the puddings that had to be steamed for hours.
With hardsauce they were so rich only a small piece would lift you off the ground.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 11, 2009
8:20 PM

Post #7359487

GE, O/T have you ever been over to that art institute in Chatauqua?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
8:26 PM

Post #7359506

Yes.I used to do an art show there.
I heard Zubin Mehta conduct The Pines of Rome the first night of the 3 nday show.
It brought tears to my eyes and a 10 minute standing ovation from the crowd.
I must buy the CD
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 11, 2009
8:42 PM

Post #7359542

Love Zubin Mehta. The gals that I sail with have homes there. One owns an antique shop there too. They are always trying to get me up there, but I haven't made it yet as they also drag me to all sorts of other places. They forget that I still work!!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
8:49 PM

Post #7359565

It is a bit "uptight" for me.
It's my impression most of the homes inside the compound are left to the present owners and the social life depends on WHO you are and where you live. I could be wrong tho.
Otherwise it is a beautiful lake and the area is unserpassed for natueral beauty.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 11, 2009
9:04 PM

Post #7359607

They have homes at the lake. They're not the least bit uptight. Quite the contrary, but the full time residents might be.` My friend has had her antique shop there for 40 years. It's only open a few days a week in the summer. She said the folks are all friendly now, but weren't in the beginning.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2009
9:21 PM

Post #7359650

Yes thats the impression I had.
I'm off for the rest of the day.Dinner is burning

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