garlic in a jar

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

I bought a small jar of minced garlic for emergencies. I used some of it in a recipe the other day and while sauteeing it just didn't have the good smell of freshly minced garlic. It did not smell rancid or bad. I did not notice it tasting odd when tasting the dish after cooking. The dish was sent to friends and did not really get to 'savor'. Any comments re: garlic in a jar?

North Augusta, ON

I swear by it, it is all I ever use. Personally I can't tell the difference. I even mix it with butter and make my own garlic bread spread.
1/4 tsp. = 1 clove.

North Saanich, Canada

I use it all the time too. Buy a big jar at Costco. I love it for ease of use, and not having to dice or crush garlic cloves. Haven't had garlic heads in the house for a long time. Love the smell of garlic and onion browning. Just did some tonight and there was a heavenly smell!!!

Moss Point, MS(Zone 8b)

Just be aware that most of the garlic in jars is imported from China.

Hillsborough, NC(Zone 7b)

Hi
Years and years ago - I recall reading (??/hearing??) that "fresh" garlic in jar stored can get dangerous - Botulism.

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

This is from the Christopher Ranch in Gilroy, Calif. Just 12 hrs down the freeway from me.

Hillsborough, NC(Zone 7b)

Found this on food safety . com

Someone was asking about garlic in oil safety that the person had made at home.


The danger in making garlic in oil products from fresh garlic (or herbs)is associated with Clostridium botulinum, which can be present on the garlic or herbs and grow when placed in an anaerobic (without oxygen) environment.

Symptoms of poisoning from Clostridium botulinum toxin usually occur within 12-72 hours. Symptoms are typically vomiting, diarrhea, blurred vision, double vision, muscle weakness, and difficulty swallowing. Unless discovered very early, an anti-toxin isn't much help, but if you experience any of the typical symptoms you should see a doctor.

Commercially processed garlic/herb in oil foods are acidified, or made with cooked and dried herbs or garlic to prevent the production of botulinum toxin. The mixture you made, while very dangerous, can be made safer by storing in the refrigerator and using within 2 weeks, or using dried garlic. The toxin is not easily destroyed by cooking, so the mixture should be discarded.

Moss Point, MS(Zone 8b)

Last week I separated all my garlic that I harvested in June, blanched, peeled and put it through my herb chopper. I filled a jar about 3/4 full and topped it up with white vinegar. I took a butter knife and tried to remove the air and distribute the vinegar. I haven't used it yet.

Most of the problems I've heard about come from only using oil which sets up ideal conditions for botulism. I'm hoping the vinegar will not be noticeable in recipes.

Hillsborough, NC(Zone 7b)

Yes you are right Twiggy _ I do remember it was related to the oil.

Danbury, CT(Zone 6a)

I think that the garlic you get in a jar at the grocery has vinegar to keep it from spoiling. I have used it in the past, out of my own laziness, I confess. After awhile I had to face the fact that it just didn't taste the same to me as when I just go ahead and chop up garlic. So I quit using the jarred stuff. It is fantastically convenient though.

Plano, TX

i agree -i've used it but it just isn't the same to me-much milder i think

Murfreesboro, TN(Zone 7a)

For some reason, the garlic in bigger jars seems to have (and hold) a better taste than the stuff in the small jars. It is milder than fresh garlic, but I can compensate for that a lot easier than if it's bitter and bitey.

Keaau, HI(Zone 11)

I use it all the time...because I loooooove garlic...and I notice the difference between that and fresh. When I want the garlic to be really important, I use fresh (and alot of it).

I keep a jar in the fridge of 'jar garlic' in olive oil to use for that 'all purpose' baste, flavor, coating...whatever!!!! Especially for grilled vegies!!!

Plano, TX

aloha i do the same
i use fresh when i think it is important to the recipe and jar o garlic any other time (or when i am being lazy)
i have a really nice garlic press from ikea but i don't seem to like "pressed" as much for some reason--i do use it sometimes but i guess when it is crushed it doesn't seem to saute the same as chopped--

Clay Center, KS(Zone 5b)

I agree, the fresh has a better taste, the garlic in a jar lacks something, but I have found over the years, the "big" jar of chopped/minced garlic from Walmart tastes better than the little jars purchased elsewhere. There is a definite danger in preserving your own garlic in oil vs. the commercially processed. The bottom line is that home preserved garlic and the danger of botulism is not worth it.

St. Helens, OR(Zone 8b)

There is at least one strain of botulism which will grow under refrigeration, so even cold storage isn't infallible.

Thus, the refrigerated storage time for homemade garlic-in-oil has been revised downward. Now the common recommendation is to make only small amounts and discard after 7 days.

Carol

Lakeville, MN

I made a garlic thingie from a recipe by Rick Bayless. It was olive oil, minced garlic (lots) and lemon or lime. He said it lasted several weeks.; I put it on everything. It is awesome. So does the lemon juice or lime juice (can't remember which) make it safer?

Now I'm paranoid.

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

freeze and take out a spoonful when needed. I do that w/ homemade pesto.

Olympia, WA

The botulism bacteria grows in anaerobic (low to no oxygen) environments. Oil provides the perfect setup. pH is also important - so by adding acidic ingredients, it is a deterrent. Once botulism has begun growing, that deadly toxin IS deactivated by high temps of cooking. THAT is the reason for boiling any home canned veggies and meats - which are not acidic. High sugar content is another deterrent to the growth of Clostridium botulinum.

Regardless, death is forever and much too high a price to pay - as much as I love garlic. Commercially prepared IS safer.

Niles, MI(Zone 5a)

Easy way to have garlic in olive oil..........
I peel and chop the garlic, 1 cup of garlic to one cup olive oil,
half fill an icecube tray(this is about a tbs and a half of grlic and oil, then freeze, may take a while to freeze because of the oil, but worth it, then I place in plastic tupper ware in freezed. When I need for recile, i just use one "Cube". This is the way my Italian housekeeper showed me to Save my garlic.

Olympia, WA

annabelle - thank you for giving us another option - and a wonderfully safe one at that!!!!!!

Niles, MI(Zone 5a)

I ran a restuarant for many years, and using this method, I never has a problem, and the bonus, not galric going bad.

Greensboro, NC(Zone 7a)

I don't use the garlic in oil, it looks like watery liquid and it tends to be mild and sort of sweet tasting--almost roasted but it isn't roasted. I tend to use it in stuff when I want a milder touch of garlic. I still use fresh garlic for most sauces or Italian recipes but in meatloaves or garlic bread spread I like the milder jarred garlic.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

My DH got me one of those ceramic garlic graters after the one I bought in France broke. The new one also came with a flexible rubber/plastic tube in which you place unpeeled garlic, and then roll it around while pressing the tube with your hand. It takes the peel off beautifully, and is a great way to make the little garlic heads I grew in my garden much easier to use. I can stick a whole head in there and end up with peeled cloves.

That said, I do have some chopped organic garlic in a jar that I use sometimes, but I agree that it's not like fresh garlic.

Gibraltar, MI

PEELED GARLIC STORAGE QUESTION

Have to make massive amount of chili for a cook-off this Saturday. Will flour, brown & cook meat (10#!) Friday, then make chili & refrigerate. Will reheat Saturday, BUT the recipe calls for 100 cloves of peeled garlic!!

Am considering prepping the garlic Thursday to lighten my work load on Friday.. Am I okay to assume it will keep in a container in the fridge for a day?

Thx in advance

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

Best of luck to you Goblinmama! I would assume minced or pressed garlic would be just fine in frig for a day.
What might you win in this cook off?

found this on the internet:
To remove the garlic smell from your hands, simply rub your hands with a stainless steel spoon or other stainless steel utensil.

Don't have stainless steel utensils on hand? A little salt or baking soda rubbed on the hands should also do the trick.


This past week end a local tv station featured a woman from the Oregon coast who cracked and removed meat from a whole crab in just under 3 min. She runs a popular restaurant and 35+ yrs has this down.
Give us your best time to prep 100 cloves!!

Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

I've seen huge jars of whole, peeled garlic cloves at Costco.

Quote from Goblinmama :
PEELED GARLIC STORAGE QUESTION

Have to make massive amount of chili for a cook-off this Saturday. Will flour, brown & cook meat (10#!) Friday, then make chili & refrigerate. Will reheat Saturday, BUT the recipe calls for 100 cloves of peeled garlic!!

Am considering prepping the garlic Thursday to lighten my work load on Friday.. Am I okay to assume it will keep in a container in the fridge for a day?

Thx in advance


New Orleans, LA(Zone 9a)

Quote from 1_Lucky_Texan :
I've seen huge jars of whole, peeled garlic cloves at Costco.


That's how I buy my garlic! Great for making sauteed & simmered garlic, similar to baked garlic. If it starts to go bad before I can use it all, then I simply chop & freeze or dry it.
Jo-Ann

Greensboro, NC(Zone 7a)

Just saw this on Rachel Ray's Week in a Day show--for the mild softened garlic you get from roasting but faster--she boiled/simmered garlic cloves in a pot of water. Won't have that carmelized thing but it was mild, soft and spreadable.

New Orleans, LA(Zone 9a)

Quote from dmac085 :
Just saw this on Rachel Ray's Week in a Day show--for the mild softened garlic you get from roasting but faster--she boiled/simmered garlic cloves in a pot of water. Won't have that carmelized thing but it was mild, soft and spreadable.



If you brown the garlic in a little olive oil and then simmer it in chicken stock, it comes out almost just like baked garlic! You get the caramilization, and you don't have to heat up the whole oven for just a head of garlic. I do a lit at once, and then freeze it in small portions.

Greensboro, NC(Zone 7a)

Cool:) Great suggestion--will definitely give that a try!

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