Photo by Melody
Guess what time it is? It's time for the DG County Fair! Now in it's sixth year, enter your blue-ribbon photos or mouth-watering recipes for a chance to win a gift subscription! Click here here to get all the details, dates and entry rules.

Seed Germination: Growing CLIVIA from Seed - Any Advice?

Communities > Forums > Seed Germination
bookmark
Forum: Seed GerminationReplies: 17, Views: 133
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
SCBegoniaGuy
Columbia, SC
(Zone 8a)

January 2, 2010
11:16 PM

Post #7421042

I've germinated 2 Clivia seeds successfully. Here's a photo. This growth has taken about 6 weeks, although a 'taproot' structure grew long before the upward growth seen below.

I don't see a DG Plant Thread for Clivia (or Crinum), so I'm looking for advice here. Any direction is appreciated.

I need to know what to do with these next. I understand they may be years from flowering, but I'm a very patient plant person...

Thumbnail by SCBegoniaGuy
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ceejaytown
The Woodlands, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 12, 2010
1:40 AM

Post #7453626

This is from the plantzafrica site on clivia miniata: Clivia miniata can be propagated by seed or by removing suckers. The fruits are bright orange when ripe (or golden in the case of the yellow flowered plants). The pulp should be removed from the seed when you are ready to sow . The seeds are large with a pearly sheen and should be sown fresh for best results. (Remember to wash your hands very well after cleaning the seed.) Sow the seed in deep trays in sifted seedling mix which has been sterilized. Simply press the seeds gently into the mix until they are almost flush with the surface. The medium should be kept moist but since the seeds take a long time to germinate (four to six weeks), keep an eye out for algal growths on the surface which will deprive the germinating seeds of oxygen. They may remain in the trays for up to two years before they are large enough to plant on.
SCBegoniaGuy
Columbia, SC
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2010
1:32 PM

Post #7454670

Thanks, ceejaytown. I knew they were slow to mature...thus the high price for flowering plants. But I never dreamed they could sit for 2 years! I'll keep these in the same "happy place" where I germinated them (with bottom heat)...and try to forget about them for a while. Hopefully I'll see a "true leaf" before TOO long. I think the mature plants will make it worth the effort...
ceejaytown
The Woodlands, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 12, 2010
5:22 PM

Post #7455460

Well, it's good that you are a very patient plant person... :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 16, 2010
9:03 PM

Post #7467906

I've got a couple clivia's from seed. One yellow I bought at a seedling sale
is about 6-7yrs old and no bloom. The other I started from seed about 4-5yrs
ago. No bloom. I'm not good at getting these guys to bloom.

Tam ... patient but running low on patience ...
SCBegoniaGuy
Columbia, SC
(Zone 8a)

January 17, 2010
3:34 PM

Post #7469793

Tammy, I read somewhere that they'd sometimes respond well to a period of neglect -- with little water and little light -- then, when you re-introduce them to regular conditions, they might set blooms. Of course, I'm about 5 years behind you (LOL), but it might hold some truth. These definitely seem like the slowest-growing thing I've ever tried...in the house, the yard, or the greenhouse! Best of luck...

Scott

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 17, 2010
4:12 PM

Post #7469938

Scott - I've read the same thing. Also that they like to be pot bound.
I have one that is about 15-17 years old too. Its bloomed most years
but not really anything as large as it should. I think maybe I haven't
been feeding them enough. I've tried keeping them dry, And our
house does get very cool in the winter - we let it go to 55deg at night.
And they all got very pot bound. I've repotted them and am feeding
them this year.

I feel like that guy on Little Shop of Horrors with AudreyII some days.

Tam
SCBegoniaGuy
Columbia, SC
(Zone 8a)

January 17, 2010
7:47 PM

Post #7470501

Your "Audrey II" comment made me laugh. :)

These plants might appreciate some chilly weather...even if for a short period of time...to spur them toward blooming. In my zone, I take everything outside in the summer...then leave them out to experience cooler temps in the fall, depending on the type of plant.

My only other suggestion might sound weird. I use regular fertilizer (like Miracle Grow), which I think is high in Nitrogen. But I've also used what is marketed as "orchid bloom booster" on NON-orchid plants occasionally. It's higher in Phosphates, which jump-start blooms on orchids. It might be worth a shot with other plants as well. I'm still experimenting. It certainly hasn't done any 'harm,' and might eventually do some good...on otherwise stubborn flowering plants. Good luck! Feed 'em, Seymour...LOL...
ceejaytown
The Woodlands, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2010
12:48 AM

Post #7471276

I have had a clivia for several years, too. My experience is that they do like to be root bound. I put mine outside in the spring, under cover of the car port (don't want too much water), during which time I give it water and fertilizer. I leave it there until the temps drop below 50 on a regular basis (the cooling off period). I water it very little after I bring it back into the house, and am usually rewarded with blooms in January or February.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 18, 2010
2:34 AM

Post #7471596

thanks for the tips!
SCBegoniaGuy
Columbia, SC
(Zone 8a)

August 14, 2010
3:04 PM

Post #8039844

If you guys are still on Dave's...here's an update on this thread. The picture here shows those seedlings after 9 months...and still only single-leaf plants. Only recently did I get up the courage to put them outside...since they were tender seedlings. Maybe the added light will give them a growth spurt...before having to come back inside again.

Anyway, I'll also post the two mature plants I found today at a local market. They seem to be large enough to bloom...so I guess my patience wore thin. About 12-14 leaves each...so here's hoping! One's yellow; one is orange. My assumption is they're both miniatas...but their labels simply says "Kaffir Lily / Clivia."

Nonetheless, I'll take care of these seedlings for as many tears as it takes. But now I have a jump-start!

Thumbnail by SCBegoniaGuy
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SCBegoniaGuy
Columbia, SC
(Zone 8a)

August 14, 2010
3:06 PM

Post #8039847

And here are the new kids. They seem really tall to me, with upward growth. Again, 12-14 leaves each. Any insight?

Thumbnail by SCBegoniaGuy
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Deebie
Orangeburg, SC

August 16, 2010
10:30 AM

Post #8043272

Hey BegoniaGuy, did you say that you found clivia plants at a local market? What market? If you don't mind my asking.
echoes
South of Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 3a)

August 17, 2010
9:59 PM

Post #8046724

My first clivia came from a pup on a mature plant, in the wrong soil and doing poorly. It took probably a couple of years to bloom. They seem to like to be a bit confined. I have several sets of seedlings going. Some from my plant and some that a friend ordered. If you order these seeds in the mail, they need to be fresh and can't take freezing. I had some sent from England too early in the spring and they froze. I've started them pretty much the same way, and by soaking them in water with peroxide, or in a damp paper towel. I had the best luck with my own seeds, which were fresher.

My plants are growing in a north bay window in a bright room with natural light coming from three directions. The first plant has bloomed every year consistently and sometimes two or three times a year. They haven't been put outside. It does get cool in that window in the winter. I use a little fertilizer(Schultz Liqid Plant Food 10-15-10) every watering, except for the winter months.

Thumbnail by echoes
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SCBegoniaGuy
Columbia, SC
(Zone 8a)

August 21, 2010
8:04 PM

Post #8054488

Good info, Echoes. They must enjoy good light. My north-facing bay window wouldn't give as much...because there are no other windows in the room. I'd bet regular snow increase the light reflecting into your house, too (never considered that before). I grow lots of orchids, also...so feeding "weakly weekly" will work well. Looking forward to these! Is yours red..or just a darker orange? Beautiful picture!
aloeman
witbank
South Africa

December 1, 2010
5:00 AM

Post #8238641

u should not stress this much about clivia's they are nice plants and yes they need a periode of cold weather. this periode must be as long as 10 days with consistant cold temp. i water y clivia's with ice water just before the winter starts and always got nice blooms on mine. if they flower in the v of the leaves give them lots of water.

chris

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 1, 2010
8:28 AM

Post #8239010

that's very clever - watering with ice water. I may just give it a try.
Tam
aloeman
witbank
South Africa

December 1, 2010
9:17 AM

Post #8239093

check out a website called clivianet. i think u will find it interesting. unfortunately i do not have the full adress for them.

chris

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Seed Germination Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Propagation: Why are some seedlings "leggy"? gardendragon 18 May 8, 2013 6:47 PM
Welcome to the Seed Germination Discussion Forum! dave 20 Dec 23, 2009 2:56 PM
Jiffy Mini-Greenhouse for starting seeds PeggieK 188 Mar 21, 2013 11:19 AM
Stratification kimmers 27 Mar 26, 2014 4:37 PM
Sowing in Spaghnum moss Laurie1 3 Mar 8, 2007 11:55 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America