Corn Cob Bedding

Medina, OH

Anyone tried it? How does it compare to pine shavings? Thanks! S.

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

i don't usually post on the equine forum as i have been horseless for many years but your question brought back memories of an old mare we had years ago who developed colic and died from eating her corn cob bedding. i don't know if this was an unusual case or not but based on that one experience, i've never used it again.

South Hamilton, MA

You may be horseless (as are we) but as your last post shows, experience can answer a lot of questions.

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

thank you. i miss being owned by a good horse.

Perth,, ON(Zone 5a)

I know how you feel

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

sigh.......

Perth,, ON(Zone 5a)

nicker...snuffles hair.....

Victoria, TX(Zone 9b)

Anybody wanna carrot?

Or a wrapped peppermint?

Oh,okay. Just let me get the wrapper off first..
You snarky little things! The wrapper! Don't eat the wrapper!

=)

Medina, OH

Trackinsand-First off, so sorry to hear of the loss of your mare. We never really get over those losses, do we? Secondly, thank you for confirming my doubts about the corncob bedding. A friend recommended I try it for my new horse who can really wreck a stall. She thought the corncob bedding would be more absorbent and possibly save me some mucking. I held off just because I was afraid he might eat it. He is calming down at night now and I think my good old pine shavings will do just fine. Thanks for taking the time to respond to my query. Susan

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

you're so welcome.
i'm glad you didn't use it.
when in doubt, when it comes to horses, go with your gut.

Richmond, TX

If you have a real mulcher of a horse you might try the pelleted bedding. It seems expensive at first, but those pellets grow into a lot of sawdust when moisture is added. You waste almost none when you muck out and the process is a lot easier. Plus the cleanings compost more quickly than shavings.

Medina, OH

Porkpal-Thanks for the input. I have used pelleted bedding in the past-but-if memory serves me...don't they suggest dampening it down first? It is a steady 10' here and dampening anything is out of the question. Guess he would mangle it down pretty well just on his own. H-m-m-m- might be worth a try. Thanks again! S.

Richmond, TX

I always let the animals do the damping.

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

we've been having an interesting discussion on cheap cat litter over in the pet forum. i switched to pine pellets about 6 yrs. ago but just in the past year i discovered the Equine Pine Pellets at tractor supply. they've switched brands recently but still the same stuff. it's usually between 4-6 dollars for 40 lbs.

quite a savings from regular cat litter!

just a little FYI for you cat lovers in the equine forum.

Richmond, TX

We use the pellets for cats, chickens, calves, horses... they're great.

Grinnell, IA

I have tried all the kinds of bedding- each has its own advantage and disadvantage- I like the pellets (corn cob or wood) but it does get worn down to dust after a while- I have a mare about to foal- going to use straw for her (unless she beats me to it in the pasture!). I'm new at this- wanted a horse when I was 15- just got one at 58!!

Thumbnail by lizmal
South Hamilton, MA

Good for you. I got my first horse when I was 30. It had a bad influence on the rest of the family--Jumper 2 & her daughter who is going to work on equine studies at college.

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

good for you! great picture too.
i had horses all my life but now at 58, i'm horseless....

Richmond, TX

Straw is the best bedding for foaling but the pasture might be even better.

Huron, OH(Zone 5b)

i get to ride again when DD heads off to college.

Straw is good for foaling.

Clinton, CT(Zone 6b)

Jumping in here... I dont muck my own stall, however I am great friends with the owner of my barn and I hang with her all the time and hear the inside scoop... We tried the woody peat pellets for a couple weeks. I don't know her actual routine that she used, but I do know that after one week, it reaked!!! She would have to strip the entire stall and start fresh. Not much of a money saver. But the first few days with it were great. I think she also tried to add extra pellets during the week to help, but no good.

Without giving up on the stuff, she found a way to make it work. She uses the regular pine shavings, muck as usual, taking and adding each day. But on Saturday's she adds one bag of the woody peat to each stall. It has kept the fly's down, the smell down, keeps the horses that like to lay down cleaner, and makes for less waste of shavings on a day to day basis. The woody pellets absorb the wet, and mixed with the pine, keeps the smell down.

Don't know if this helps any, but thought I would add my 2 cents!
Good luck,
Kristen

Victoria, TX(Zone 9b)

The neatest & best stall solution I've seen.. mats on top of really packed deep sand

At the ranch we did the HorseMaster taping at, they had mats, and maybe a bag or two of shavings on top. They'd grab a forkful of shavings at a time, and toss 'em towards the middle of the stall. Wet shavings and poo would "roll off the pile", making it easy to pick up. Scoop all the shavigns to the middle, add if necessary.
As they described it, the shavings were only "to absorb the stink", not to provide cushion or comfort. Cleanest stalls I've seen, by far...

Boaz, KY

Hi Everyone! (waving) I just found y'all, so I'm coming into the conversation late. I agree with AngelSong -- rubber mats are great! Ours are laid over a limestone base, then we bed with shavings. That's an interesting way to find biscuits, Angel, but I can't figure out how wet shavings would "roll off the pile". My wet shavings just kind of sit there. (shrugging)

Anyrate -- with rubber mats in place, it's a simple matter to locate and remove wet shavings and horse biscuits, and the barn always smells good because urine can't soak into the ground -- out it goes with the shavings! Shavings are replaced at about a wheelbarrow a day. But I DO use shavings for cushion and comfort. I want a soft place for my horses to lay down at night.

OK -- thought I'd put in my two cents worth! :-D

Victoria, TX(Zone 9b)

I didn't clean the stalls - since I was at the show filming, and paying the barn, I helped a little. Honestly, the barn crew kept telling me, "You're our guest, stop it! Let us clean & feed!!! We like doing it!" So I spent time standing around chatting with them while they cleaned & fed.

It was really impressive how clean their barn was with the mats & minimal shavings. Somehow, they kept all the wet shavings out, too..

Boaz, KY

Oh -- I meant to add -- every Amish farm that I've been to uses corn cobs for horse bedding. Looks awful, and the horses look uncomfortable about moving around. I question how absorbent corn cobs are, which is the whole point of bedding. And I don't know how horses stand up with those cobs rolling out from under their hooves. I can't imagine that the horses get much rest in their stalls..................

Richmond, TX

I think the corn cob bedding is usually made from shredded cobs.

Boaz, KY

Ah -- that would make a whole lot more sense!! I've never seen that. But I've seen corn cobs used as bedding. Yuck!!

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