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Heirloom Vegetables: Idiot Proof Sweet Peppers

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snoggle
Big Creek, KY

February 27, 2010
5:54 PM

Post #7592294

Every year I try to grow sweet peppers, and every year, for numerous reasons, I am less than successful. I am determined to have better luck this year. I would like to grow some "idiot proof" sweet peppers. I've read that Gypsy and Carmen are very prolific, easy to grow hybrids. I'm going to try Gypsy, but I'd really like to grow more heirlooms if possible. Which heirloom sweet peppers, bell or non-bell, do you like to grow that are yummy, easy, and very productive?

After reading the Baker Creek Heirloom customer reviews I'm going to try "Red Belgian" and "Red Cheese". Any thoughts? Any other ideas?
twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

February 27, 2010
6:17 PM

Post #7592339

It's hard for me to imagine anything more productive than Gypsy but Giant Aconcagua and Red Marconi are open pollinated and fine producers for me. All of these do better than any bell I've tried.

This year I've gotten seeds for several bell types and will try again. Bells never get good sized for me and it's very frustrating since I love stuffed peppers. Hot peppers grow like weeds but I only grow them for other people.

Last year I grew Pimento L and it was very thick walled and I stuffed some. They were great but not nearly as large as I'd like.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 7, 2010
10:10 PM

Post #7612253

I'm a newbie growing bells from seeds for the 1st time. I'm growing King of the North and Emerald Giants. They germinated in 9 days and have been going full steam ahead ever since.

Linda

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twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

March 7, 2010
10:58 PM

Post #7612283

Those plants are beautiful and you ought to load up. Mine are just germinating. I started late hoping to avoid the aphids. I was going to cheat by overwintering 6 in the GH but the cold got them. Only 1 kind survived and that's those Tepins that grow wild in Texas. They're so hot I can't eat them. I'm starting several big bells hoping to find one that does real well for me. Your plants look big enough to start blooming.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 8, 2010
7:38 AM

Post #7612839

Twiggybuds,
I believe you and I are both trying to grow a LARGE bell pepper for the first time. I have two bells that have refused to die in the last two years, and just yesterday, I cut off four silver dollar sized bells.

I wanna grow a BIG bell pepper! We use them in just about every meal we cook in the South. I also need to grow BULB onions!

Looks like we're gonna be starting a prayer vigil over these seedlings. I don't know what else to do...

P.S. You're right about the blooming! Every time I examine them closely I expect to find a bud.

I think I'm gonna go ahead and plant out the ones I intend to keep this weekend in the raised bed. I'm gonna put a hoop house over it, so that should take care of any freeze threats, and keep them warm enough to start doing their thing early on!

I'll keep you posted.

P.S. How much would you pay for one of those seedlings?
twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

March 10, 2010
8:39 PM

Post #7620239

lol. I'm the wrong one to ask because I haven't bought any in more than 10 years and I'm a tightwad. They look bigger and better than average and if there's a nice name that's worth something too. Then it comes back to who you're selling to such as deep pockets or penny pinchers. If they're starting to bud, that really gets folks cranked up. They're worth more than those little ones they sell at WM and Lowes for sure.

This is about average for online sales but if it was me, I'd rather see it in the flesh and buy local. Good Luck with it.

http://www.thechilewoman.com/sweetpeppers/


joanlc
Perham, MN
(Zone 3b)

March 21, 2010
7:53 AM

Post #7645124

Hey Gymgirl and Twiggybuds -- there are lots of large bell peppers, but some do seem to stand out. I grew "Admiral" peppers (among others) last year - biggest, blockiest fruit I've ever had on a pepper. They're yellow at maturity. Highly recommended. The red sweet peppers I grew weren't as thick or intensely sweet (had a different kind of intensity, still good), and most of them were somewhat pointier on the ends. Here's a photo of one lunch last fall. I think culture will have a lot to do with it though - so many factors of heat, sun, moisture, fertility will play into your results. What I did here in the North might not help you much, so ask your locally successful gardeners about that stuff.

Edit! - Just realized this is the *heirloom* vegetable forum, which I forgot, having arrived from the general vegetable forum. I'm pretty sure Admiral is a hybrid. Oops.

This message was edited Mar 21, 2010 9:55 AM

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twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

March 21, 2010
8:43 AM

Post #7645236

Those are gorgeous vegs. From what I can tell MN has great soil and anything thrives in it. I wouldn't want to trade winters but I'm definitely jealous of that great black dirt.

I've never grown the big yellow ones but this year I have several. Quadrato Asti'd Gallo, Early Sunsation, plus Blushing Beauty, Burpee's color mix, Valencia and Chinese Giant. Out of all that I should end up with some decent bells. I know the Valencia is a hybrid but I think the rest are OP. I've really enjoyed lots of stirfry meals with my homegrown peppers, onions and pak choi. Real health food.
joanlc
Perham, MN
(Zone 3b)

March 21, 2010
5:16 PM

Post #7646361

My bit of Minnesota is pure sand, as is a lot of the lakes country. Bottomland, on the other hand - stuff where old glaciers particularly dumped a lot of silt - are what you're thinking of. These were raised on straight sand (old farmland though, where poor practice eroded away almost all the topsoil) with as much manure as I could haul in by myself. And - Osmocote. I bet you'll get great peppers - I suspect the keys are nutrition, heat, and a regular water supply. We never got the heat here last summer, but waiting long enough produced a similar result, I think.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 21, 2010
6:10 PM

Post #7646520

Those are gorgeous! And just the size and shape I'm talkin' about! Admirals, huh?

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