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Poppies: planting poppy seed-I'm a failure!!

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mwhit
Tiffin, OH
(Zone 5a)

April 3, 2010
3:28 PM

Post #7677543

Several years ago we took a family vacation to the Seattle area (in late July) We stayed in a guest house and the hostess told me to take all I wanted of the seedpods from her gorgeous garden of poppies. I harvested like a mad woman -carefully keeping the colors separated in 35mm film canisters. I brought them back to Ohio, saved them until early spring and planted them in peat pots under lights and on a heat mat. The seed was dry and semed fine but I got NO germination- not one seedling in 144 cells.
What did I do wrong? I never saw such beautiful poppies and I want them in my yard!! Thanks to any and all responders, MWhit
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 3, 2010
5:24 PM

Post #7677784

It probably wasn't anything you did or didn't do. Since not one seed germinated it would have to be either sterile seed or some other problem.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

April 3, 2010
5:26 PM

Post #7677785

Hi Mwhit;

I am a firm believer in temperatures in the 60s or lower for poppy germination. I Mention this because we have from time to time had discussions as to weather or not to use bottom heat on poppies. Here's my suggestions:

For orientals sow them in a light mixture. put them in a plastic bag and place them under lights in acool area. ( my basement usually is in the 50s or 60s) .

You can winter sow orientals and they do well.

You can do the same for P. naudicale. I have not flowered these yet as they are a bienniel and this is my first year for them. I do have oodles of seedlings though.

I have sown shirley poppies by sowing them on the late winter snow. They will germinate prolifery. They also will volunteer.

P somiferum also germinates at low temperatures. I have winter sown them with huge numbers of seedlings. They become somewhat of an invasive and since they die in the the heat of th summer i no longer grow them and indeed am weeding them out.

Finally there is the blue poppy ( I think meconopsis) which according to reports is very difficult to grow except in Alaska.
mwhit
Tiffin, OH
(Zone 5a)

April 3, 2010
5:45 PM

Post #7677822

Thanks, Pirl- I feel less like a failure!

Timeinabottle-(Love the name-one of my favorite Jim Croce songs!) I bought some more poppy seed from EBay -I will try starting under lights,in a light mix with no bottom heat- I hope that is the magic formula I am looking for! will let you all know how it works out!! Thanks! MWhit

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 4, 2010
2:04 AM

Post #7678594

If your poppies are annuals just sow them on the ground now while its cold. Sow them where you want them to grow,
Oriental or perennial Poppies are different.The seeds need a cold period (as does the annuals) in order to germinate.
Your film canister seeds might not have been ripe enough when you harvested.
mwhit
Tiffin, OH
(Zone 5a)

April 4, 2010
7:35 PM

Post #7680220

ge1836: Thanks for the info re: a cold period-will they get enough cold exposure now? I just purchased them this month. The weather has been unseasonably warm so far this spring. As far as the seeds from Seattle-they were dry and rattled in the pods and I didn't have any mold or any other signs of too much moisture when I planted them but since my problems were so all inclusive that is a possibility-I just couldn't resist them -the colors were just heavenly and some of the flowers were huge! I had white, lavender, pink, purple, red, peach -just beautiful!! Thanks again for your insight! MW

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 5, 2010
2:14 AM

Post #7680657

It might be too late for annual poppies.If the seeds didnt cost too much you could risk planting now.
I sow them on the bare ground in December and March but early.
lljjz
Turner, OR

April 15, 2010
9:53 PM

Post #7709162

Hi, I have been growing all kinds of poppies for years now and I'll tell you just as my mother told me! All you have to do is loosen up the soil and sprinkle the seeds on top! dont do anything fancy it wont help. You should be albe to still get some going if you put outside now! I have also tried to start indoors but it just didnt work out! If you want to try I can send you some seeds to get started!
Marie

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 16, 2010
2:31 AM

Post #7709291

Good luck and let us know if you get poppies.
mwhit
Tiffin, OH
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2010
4:58 PM

Post #7716158

lljjz: you have Dmail!!
ge1836-I will post pictures if we have poppies!
Thanks again for the expert input!! MWhit
lljjz
Turner, OR

April 20, 2010
9:20 AM

Post #7720978

you are so welcome! And dont worry you will have a ton of poppies for years to come as they reseed themselfs!
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

April 20, 2010
6:10 PM

Post #7722371

mwhit please keep us posted. If you have trouble I may have some O pop seedlings to send you. These are ones I started in my basement.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 21, 2010
2:25 AM

Post #7723235

I think my DropDead Georgeous poppies are late. Just found a dried skeleton of a pod with a clump of teeeeny hairlike leaves. Some of the new poppies from OneStop havnt germinated.I remain hopeful.
paracelsus
Elmira, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 22, 2010
10:51 AM

Post #7727399

The heat mat was definitely the problem. If they were P. somniferum, and it sounds like they were, they have decreasing germination above 70F and stop germinating above 80F. They like it 55-65F for germination, much colder than most plants. They should germinate fine without any heat.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 26, 2010
3:18 AM

Post #7737651

After all my skeptical talk about sowing annual poppies now. I have just placed an order for more and will sow them as soon as they come.
I want poppies with my lilies and the ones I sowed last fall just arent comming.
This is what I will combine
Hungarian Blue
Giganteum White
Peony Black Pearl

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 26, 2010
5:22 AM

Post #7737822

What a gorgeous color harmony collage that is! I hope they germinate and grow for you. I sprinkled all I had left on Saturday with the hopes that our rainy days and cool nights will work miracles.

I've learned now (finally) to clear the spots well in advance of putting down the seeds in February of next year.
paracelsus
Elmira, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 26, 2010
12:31 PM

Post #7739194

Unless they are some cheap Cal pops or corn pops that I can buy by the pound, I always start poppies as transplants in peat pellets. That way I get excellent germination and know exactly what I have. Plus I can usually divide up the pellet once they have sprouted into at least two groups of plants, often four. I started a bunch of Elka poppies that way this year.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 26, 2010
12:37 PM

Post #7739214

I have never had any success starting poppies in pots. I must have too heavy a hand when it comes to transplanting.
mwhit
Tiffin, OH
(Zone 5a)

May 7, 2010
4:16 PM

Post #7773305

lljjz-you have mail!
Everyone- Thank you again for all the great advice and friendly input. I wish I could say my eBay seeds are doing well but I would sssooo be lying-they are pitiful!
Is it too late to direct sow the rest of them this year? Should I wait until fall? Could I save some until next year? Do saved seeds need to be refrigerated?
I just hate not being able to get them going! I think it is some wierd rule of nature- we always long for whatever it is we can't have!!
Thanks to all and I will continue to follow this forum and try to learn your secrets!! Melissa

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 7, 2010
4:27 PM

Post #7773339

There arent many secrets here.
I have started an experiment with annual poppies sown a few days ago.
I am hoping the cold weather we are having this weekend is enough to satisfy the need for a cold period.
Just incase the experiment fails I have kept half the seeds for a fall sowing which has always been successful for me.
When I so I dont scatter toooo broadly.so I can ID the cluster when they germinate.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

May 7, 2010
4:42 PM

Post #7773370

paracelsus.. what are Elka poppies.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 8, 2010
1:25 AM

Post #7774433

Just Googled them

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

May 8, 2010
5:18 PM

Post #7776114

so they are essentially a o. pop

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2010
4:09 AM

Post #7776867

They look like somnifareums to me,but I am not an expert.
paracelsus
Elmira, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2010
11:22 AM

Post #7777785

Fedco has them:

http://fedcoseeds.com/seeds/SeedsOrderItem.php?id=5318&SeedName=elka

I grew them last year. They were very beautiful and productive of seeds.
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2010
11:40 AM

Post #7792695

My indoor poppy seed sowing was a failure last spring.

Winter sowing was more successful, even with some of the same seeds. Mine are small, hairlike stems with tiny leaves, but I think I will get them in the garden and hope for the best. As a test, I put a tiny clump in the garden a few days ago and it is still there, looking happier than its brethren in the soda bottle. I read that it is best to plant the seedlings while still small and to not disturb the roots.

Patty's Plum oriental poppy seeds from a trade had the best germination rate for me. Hope the seedlings survive.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/90465/
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2010
11:42 AM

Post #7792699

Forgot to mention, the seeds of patty's plum may not be true to the plant, so I may be in for a surprise. That is alright with me.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2010
12:42 PM

Post #7792787

I never had any luck starting OP's from seed.Some people just have a knack for it.
That includes other plants too.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

May 16, 2010
8:12 AM

Post #7797241

ge you are right they are somniferums...I was thinking opium poppies which are of course somniferums. I am always amazed tht people have trouble growing oriental poppies from seeds. low temps until germination... followed by standard growing techniques. under lights after germination. transplant to individual pots ( not peat pots) after first set of true leaves. grow on under lights. I have just given away a flat of 48 mixed orientals and am taking another 24 pink ones to the next master gtardening meeting.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 16, 2010
8:46 AM

Post #7797318

I had no luck with OP's from seed.I buy the plants.I'm over 70 and dont have much patience.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

May 16, 2010
5:00 PM

Post #7798735

I understand that...I will be 70 in a couple of mos.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

May 22, 2010
9:38 PM

Post #7818687

I need to go back and read through this thread completely,

I have alway s failed at germinating poppy seeds by planting them in pots. I gave it up this past winter, or rather in february and threw everyone of the seeds out into the full sun garden and said if they germinate they do.

I litterally have hundreds of poppies out there all over the place, I was thrilled with the success I had at throwing them out LOL

From now on they are direct sowed onto the ground in the cold weather, and I should have success from then on out. ;0)

now i'm going back to read all the other posts LOL

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 23, 2010
2:16 AM

Post #7818895

Hi kathy-ann
I direct sow because the seeds need a cold period and light to germinate.I make sure they are sown on bare ground not mulch.I sow in November to March here in Z6.
I tried a direct sow in early May when we still had some cold nights but it didnt work.
I only used half of the seeds so I will sow the saved ones in November.
ms1954
katonah, ny
United States

May 26, 2010
10:01 AM

Post #7829559

I am right on the border of zone 5b/6a, in Westchester county, NY. I have tried all of the annual poppies with seeds from reputable seed companies, and nothing seems to come up. Mainly I tried sewing in late fall, to make sure I didn't miss giving them a nice cold period; I tried sewing in spring (late April - early May) and that didn't work either. I tried a lot of papaver rhoeas (spelling is off, I know) and Shirley poppies...nothing grew. Do birds find the seeds? My other thought is that maybe the spring-sewn ones dry out, since the bed is far from the house and I relied mainly on rain for moisture. I love poppies, and would like to make them grow.

Also, my purchased oriental poppies haven't been doing so well. I lot of them seem to rot at the crown shortly after I plant them. (Most of them are purchased online and don't look all that great when they arrive, and just don't improve.)

Any ideas?

Where do you purchase seeds of orientals?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 26, 2010
10:28 AM

Post #7829648

I direct sow annuals Somnifariums in November December. I never had luck with Rohas(sp) or Shirlies.
If you make sure the ground is bare( no mulch etc) and scratch it so its rough it works better. I step on the seedsed area ,not stomp just press .The seeds dont need any soil on hem. The winter snow and thaw will take the seed to the depth thy like.
Isow them rather thick and thin them when they germinate in April or early may.
I have never had any luck growing Orientals from seed.
paracelsus
Elmira, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 26, 2010
10:48 AM

Post #7829707

I have grown rhoeas poppies by first working the soil well so it is not full of heavy clods, smoothing down the surface with a rake, wetting the soil thoroughly, sprinkling the seeds over, and then sprinkling over more soil, usually potting soil because it's easier to handle. Then tamp down with the back of a rake. I do this in the early spring, about the time I would plant peas. No problems with them coming up and flowering, but they did not produce enough subsequent seeds to keep the bed going without reseeding. Annual poppies don't require cold stratification. They do need cool temperatures to grow. They prefer 55-65F for germination.

I grew oriental poppies from seed this year by starting them in peat pellets like I do most of the seeds I grow. I started them 4-6 weeks before the last frost date and had them growing in a cool room under lights. The seedlings are very small. I know they do spread hugely from plants in the ground, but I think that is due to massive amounts of seed being shed and that's not an efficient way to start them.

I have also grown California poppies by just throwing them out on the snow, but this requires a lot more seed. I wouldn't start a named variety of any seed that way.

Depsi

Depsi
Orofino, ID
(Zone 6a)

June 15, 2010
11:07 PM

Post #7892542

just was looking at this thread & thought I'd throw in my experience...bought a lb of breadseed poppy mix from our food co-op for $3.70, mixed it with sand and datura seeds and used a fertilizer whirly spreader thingee to sow in November and I've got seedlings everywhere...the poppies aren't the most spectacular in color but they give a nice lift to areas I needed to cover and the best part of it was that it was cheap!

Thumbnail by Depsi
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 16, 2010
1:33 AM

Post #7892597

That is a really clever idea.
I had heard bread seed poppies werent too great.They do look nice in that planting.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 16, 2010
5:17 AM

Post #7892872

Excellent idea and it looks great.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 16, 2010
5:20 AM

Post #7892881

Hi Pirl.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 16, 2010
6:28 AM

Post #7893073

Hi Jo Ann and another big thank you for the wonderful poppies, which I'm enjoying so much!

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2010
10:11 AM

Post #7893751

pretty poppy Pirl

Depsi, yours are beautiful, I know wha tyou mean about the color though, seems that's the default poppy, and all my poppies were that color too. I got gobs of seeds if anybody wants to trade. LOL

NO purple and white LOL
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

August 27, 2010
12:28 PM

Post #8065537

Sorry to be stupid but I'm afraid I just don't understand. Could someone please tell me in words of one syllable how you plant poppy seeds in the fall? I am zone 6 here. Won't any plants that germinate die during the winter? I have seeds of papaver Glaucam, some California poppies, papaver somniferum, and papaver Rhoeas. Are those the right ones for fall sewing? I don't want to go through another year without poppies.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

August 27, 2010
9:35 PM

Post #8066421

I plant mine in the dead of winter, like january I throw them onto the ground and they germinate in the spring time, don't plant them in the fall when it's still warm enough for them to germinate. you plant in the winter .
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

August 28, 2010
4:50 AM

Post #8066646

Kathy Ann is right. Just make sure when you do your fall cleaning that the areas where you want to put them are clear of leaves and debris. You might want to use a marker to remind you that you have poppies planted in specific areas. NO Preen!
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

August 28, 2010
7:41 AM

Post #8066843

Okay, I will try to prepare a very good place for them. I will send pictures if I am successful! Thank you for your help.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

August 28, 2010
8:53 AM

Post #8066935

Good luck and post photos when they bloom, please.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

August 28, 2010
2:15 PM

Post #8067348

oh pretty!!
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 10, 2010
9:34 AM

Post #8204762

I bought OP's on eBay about ten years ago. Early in October I took a walk about the property and put a pinch here and a pinch there. Three or four spots germinated the following spring. The birds have been moving them around ever since. I never know where my keepers for next summer will pop up. When they do pop up I thin them to about four to six inches apart leaving three or four in a spot. I do nothing else but toss on a shovel full of leaves or ground wood after they are up a few inches. My PH is about 6.0 naturally. I do not mess with PH either.

Two of my three close neighbors have had them planted by the birds.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2010
9:42 AM

Post #8204772

Hi Doc.
Are you talking about annuals? or perennial OP's?
Have you ever had early germinated annuals live thru the winter?

This message was edited Nov 10, 2010 12:42 PM
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

November 10, 2010
1:23 PM

Post #8205095

That's amazing.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2010
2:36 PM

Post #8205212

I always thought OP's were really fussy, Not so!
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 10, 2010
6:02 PM

Post #8205596

Frankly I did not know there were perennials in the opium poppy class. What I was talking about were annuals. I have a few purchased budded roots that are perennials. I know they are not the opium poppies. I know they do not easily germinate from seed but they will if you tinker long and hard. I don't do that so if I want perennials I will buy the budded roots in the spring. I usually buy by sight from catalogs. I would not know one from a pumpkin if I could not see it first. LOL

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2010
1:47 AM

Post #8205943

Thanks Docgipe.
I had early germination on the seeds spread in October.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

November 11, 2010
6:39 AM

Post #8206206

docgipe, I wish I were one of your neighbors.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 11, 2010
9:59 AM

Post #8206493

I now have three gardening neighbors counting two that only grow flowers that are in sight from my picnic table. Right now my gardening is confined largely to the patio and pot growing. Bunches of stuff were brought into the house as frost threatened. Somewhere about fifty pots are being held or created for use next spring. I figure them at a mental value of five bucks each. Kinda nice. All I will add are a few fill in items if I need them.

The Christmas Cactus and the Meyer Lemons are beginning to bloom. Violets have been in bloom and a few unknowns are still trying to bloom. The dahlias are packed up for the winter's rest.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2010
10:24 AM

Post #8206532

Docgipe, your patio and planter gardening is where I am headed.
I dont regret having to slow down. There is just enough planting in the pots to keep me sane.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 11, 2010
12:24 PM

Post #8206646

My plan is to develop the patio into a minature rendation of all that I used to do when the large gardens flourished. I was thinking ahead five years ago when access provisions were on paper for the scooter or wheel chair. Presently it is a scooter. More than likely four years from now if I am still looking down at the grass a wheel chair will be in order. The thought of looking up at the grass is not as pleasing as hanging in there and potting up a few pots of beauty, a few herbs and firing up the charcoal grill from time to time. As long as I can tinker it does not matter how much, how big or how wonderful anymore. It only matters that I can and will do something to keep moving.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2010
12:38 PM

Post #8206663

Yeahhhh for you.
I have a five year plan too. It has been to establish the gardens so I can putter. Still on my feet tho arthritis is bad.
I dont care. The view from y windows and deck was worth the agony.
I just remodled a shower with a wide door and no sill so If it is necessary to be in a wheelchair I canbath myself.
Both thumbs up for your plan Doc.
Life is here, we must live it.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 11, 2010
1:40 PM

Post #8206744

Good for you.

I have no use for a rocking chair or wheel chair yet. Yet I am very much aware that they will be here when I need them. I can make the local shopping mall with the scooter if I choose to do that. I do make the local hike and bike trails. With a fifteen mile range on the scooter I can go out and harass all kinds of people. At one end of the trail are three eateries. There are two public parks and even a place to catch dinner from the river. Meanwhile I still drive and do my gym thing three times a week. That's one thing Medicare has done right. Ha

Wrestling season begins tomorrow evening. We are taking the grandson to see Penn State do in Bloomsburg. Sunday Lycoming College (in town) has a major open tournament scheduled. My camera quivers every time I look at it. It is ready to go. We shall go. ):o)
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

November 11, 2010
1:59 PM

Post #8206778

I was thinking that eventually I might have to go to a sort of "window box" gardening. Not window boxes, really. More like waist-high planters, so I could plant a few things and care for them without having to crawl around on the ground, hover on my knees, or dig. Not sure yet whether the planters will be here, or some other place that has a patio or interior courtyard or even a balcony. Just so I can see a few seeds come up, and flower. Security is an issue for me. I don't want to be afraid while I am working with plants. Heck - maybe a shoulder holster that frees up my hands for planting is all I need!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2010
2:45 PM

Post #8206825

I have a GF who wers a linemans belt.

HazelCrestMikeB

HazelCrestMikeB
Hazel Crest, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 27, 2010
1:51 PM

Post #8233018

MS1954, I have had 100% success with Oriental Poppies purchased from Graceful Gardens. Mind you they don't have a big selection, but, I guarantee that you will be impressed. I also have some from High Country Garden and Heronswood Nursery among others. Spring! Spring where are you!! LOL.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2010
3:21 AM

Post #8246345

We have been having snow stormes so it has accumulated where I want to sow the last of my poppies.
I have heard of gardeners doing this,now's my chance.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

December 7, 2010
7:40 PM

Post #8249278

I threw my seeds out in february, so I figure I still have plenty of time, I haven't even bought mine yet. but i'm working on that lol

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 8, 2010
3:04 AM

Post #8249618

It becomes icy and slippery on that side of the house in Feb. The yard slopes away from the garden there.
This is the best time from that stand point. and I can sow without terror of falling. We dont usually have this much snow this early

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2010
10:45 AM

Post #8283602

Its nearly 2011 and the 2 feet of snow we had starting Nov.27 is melting. As soon as its gone in the garden I will check my early sprouted poppies.I just want to see if they are surviving.

HazelCrestMikeB

HazelCrestMikeB
Hazel Crest, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 30, 2010
6:40 PM

Post #8284187

Ge1836, I will keep my fingers crossed for you! grin

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2010
1:15 AM

Post #8284508

thanks

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2010
11:22 AM

Post #8285101

Reporting my early sprouts are still hanging in there.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

January 1, 2011
7:16 AM

Post #8286292

I have the area I seeded covered up with straw. Is that a mistake?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 1, 2011
7:19 AM

Post #8286323

It would be here in Z6.
The seeds wont germinate unless exposed to light.
It sounds unreasonable but they do well just laying out in nature. Here the freezing and thawing and rain takes the seeds to a depth they like.
This depth is unmeasurable as far as I'm concerned.
Seeds should be sown on bare ground also. they wont grow on mulch or weeds.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

January 1, 2011
8:52 AM

Post #8286481

Generally all seed that shoot or fall from a seed pod in their natural surroundings must have light to germinate. They are also preferred bird food seeds. Perhaps that is why they often create high numbers of seed.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

January 1, 2011
7:26 PM

Post #8287520

You know, this is the first time I've tried this (fall seeding.) It just doesn't seem right to me, somehow, that the seeds can take root on the bare, cold ground. I guess that's part of the miracle! But I accept that you know what you're talking about and will do as you suggest. Tomorrow I will remove the straw. Hopefully, since it tends to mat up a bit, I can just lift the straw off without disturbing anything too much. Thank you for the information - it takes some of us longer to learn than others!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2011
1:50 AM

Post #8287687

I havnt stopped learning.
It would be all over if I knew everything. I have learned more about sowing poppies since meeting gardeners here at Daves.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

January 2, 2011
7:31 AM

Post #8287975

If we all stopped learning we might as well stop living.

Just a few weeks ago I heard a gem on radio - if you don't want to weed this year make sure you get down all of your mulch by the time the forsythia blooms. I'll definitely try it this year.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2011
7:36 AM

Post #8287983

I think that makes sense. No light-no seed germination.
We have a mulch fall out here. Mulch on the gardens next to the foundation has brought mice into the house. SIL is at wits end.
My summer storage of bird seed in the garage didnt help either.
From now on I store it in a snap lid container duering feeding season and all left overs go into the trees for summer.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

January 2, 2011
7:51 AM

Post #8288004

Mouse traps do work but I don't know if you can use them since you have two cats.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2011
7:56 AM

Post #8288015

thats how we knew we had mice. Cats would eat half.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

January 2, 2011
9:59 AM

Post #8288225

I love mulch and use tons of it. There are a few plants that place their seed on bare ground. We when we understand should do likewise. My experience is that far more germinate than I wish to raise in a given spot. I pull the extras like weeds to thin out the growing area. The seedlings are a brilliant light green and shaped unlike other unlike other germinating plants at that early spring time period. After they are up four or five inches I work in some mulch.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

January 2, 2011
1:35 PM

Post #8288587

Late last fall I went over and removed a cutting of forsythia from an old homestead from which the family was forced away when the government impounded Kentucky Lake. (The people had planted daffodils which have spread everywhere now - very beautiful but sad to remember that those who planted them were made to leave them behind.) If the cutting survives - and I think it will, forsythia being a willow and tough - then I will have a bright yellow "alarm" to remind me to mulch.
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2011
7:13 PM

Post #8479516

I have horrible poppy envy!

Every year I try to winter sow annual poppies and I never have any luck at all. I can get orientals and icelandic from seeds but annuals are my biggest gardening failure. I even left specific places for them this year and scattered right before the snow all melted...so far nothing.

I can grow delphinium from seed like there is no tomorrow but poppies defeat me everytime.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 7, 2011
7:18 PM

Post #8479530

I would be HAPPY to "settle" for some orientals.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2011
1:38 AM

Post #8479889

For all my posts on the subject,I'm not having any luck with annuals sown before December or January.
Last year I sowed in late October. We had a warm spell in November and they germinated.
90% of those are struggling to get a hold.
The December sowing is comming along. Very teeeeeny 2 leaves .I need a mag glass to see them. We will have temps in the 60's-70's until Monday ,that should make them big enough to photo I hope.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 8, 2011
6:46 AM

Post #8480217

What bookreader said about the poppy envy.

I sowed seeds of four kinds of poppies in November, also lupine, and added a few this spring (about four weeks ago.)

The lupine are easy to recognize by their distinctive leaf pattern, but I don't know what the few other emergent leaves are. They seem to be coming along awfully slowly.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2011
6:52 AM

Post #8480230

this is a cloud of Venus annuals

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2011
6:53 AM

Post #8480232

Heirloom poppy seeds:

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2011
6:56 AM

Post #8480238

yup, you are 3 weeks ahead of me
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2011
7:23 AM

Post #8480283

Sorry - they were from last year. I was late planting them out this year and we only had one snow storm after I sowed them so any I get were self-seeded from last year. I'll have to take a look later today to see if any popped up.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2011
7:32 AM

Post #8480296

Nothing would surprise me when its LI.LOL
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 8, 2011
8:36 AM

Post #8480405

Oh, dear - mine don't look like that at all! They must be weeds.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2011
8:39 AM

Post #8480412

Dont yank them yet. Wait a couple of weeks and if they begin to look like pale bluegreen notched leaves they are poppies.
Too many people yank them too early.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 8, 2011
1:16 PM

Post #8480895

You'll be the first to know!
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2011
5:54 PM

Post #8481491

Last Summer or early Fall when the seed pods were open and containing seed I tossed a pinch to three new bare ground spots. I looked today and see many seedlings just now reaching first true leaf in all three locations. I will not thin them until they are into at least two sets of true leaves. Once the snow melted off they germinated very fast this Spring. I did not photograph because the above images are very good.

Mulch of any type would be stealing light that the seed needs to germinate. Maybe a very lite straw mulch would leave enough light through to enable germination. I never used any mulch until the plants were three or four inches tall. Often at that point I used a lite grass mulch which would be gone by the time new seed would be falling from the plants. They want no fertilizer of any type.

Opium poppies never fail to attract attention. Few have seen them and fewer yet have grown them.

In this day and age I would not identify them beyond the word poppies. Incidentally those seed are the same seed your baker uses so you may save and use your seed in baking if you wish. We have used them on home made rolls and bagels.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 9, 2011
4:48 AM

Post #8482177

I dont know what all the flak and fear is over opium poppies. It takes acres to produce enough of poppybud juice to make a few pounds of opium.
Thats the first hurdle,( home gardeners dont have enough room )
Second hurdle. Opium is a decoction of the juice,anyone want to know how you do that?



This message was edited Apr 9, 2011 9:30 AM
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 9, 2011
7:25 AM

Post #8482473

Thank you kindly but I'd rather just look at them (exhilarating enough!)

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 9, 2011
7:30 AM

Post #8482489

amen
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 10, 2011
8:00 AM

Post #8484840

Anyone who wants to know anything about opium poppies can simply use Google to search the interest key words. It is all there lock, stock and barrel. One fact I picked up was it is possible for a 125lb. person to be DUI after having eaten just two poppy seed bagels. I recall a long forgotten movie where a gum ball the size of a marble was being cooked on a dirty spoon. If done correctly one seed pod would provide that much gum. I never grew them when there were school age kids in our neighborhood.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

April 11, 2011
4:01 AM

Post #8486790

I have some poppies coming up!! YAY Pirl, I was going through my seeds the other day and found some heirloom poppies you sent me that I forgot to plant. ARGH!! I'm gonna have to plant them this fall.

I do have others coming up, supposedly all orientals. we'll see .
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 11, 2011
6:51 AM

Post #8487199

Kathy Ann...put a few of those seed in the freezer compartment for a week then plant them now.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 11, 2011
12:24 PM

Post #8487954

If you look at seedlings every day, will they never grow? I just may have a couple of baby poppies in there but they are sure taking their time, perhaps because it keeps hailing every week.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 11, 2011
12:41 PM

Post #8487978

Seeds know when your anxious and obcessing. They have a little club down there on the ground and when they see you comming they close up.
After you go in the house discouraged, the leaves open up again and they stand around and chat.

When the weather is consistantly warm and sunny they just forget the game of "Keep the gardener looking " and go ahead with what mother nature wants them to do. Too filled with joy at completeing their task which is to be beautiful and make the gardener happy.
lol
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 11, 2011
12:45 PM

Post #8487988

I knew it!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 11, 2011
12:50 PM

Post #8487995

ha ha ha ha .I got into the thing and thought OMG if she doesnt have a sense of humor I'm cooked.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 11, 2011
1:27 PM

Post #8488074

I enjoyed it, too, Jo Ann.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

April 11, 2011
3:49 PM

Post #8488395

pretty funny
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 11, 2011
6:26 PM

Post #8488746

What's funny? I thought that is the way the system really works guided and coached by a few garden spirits by several names.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 11, 2011
6:46 PM

Post #8488804

...and some of those spirit's names cannot be mentioned in front of young children.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

April 11, 2011
6:51 PM

Post #8488826

I didn't know i could do that, thanks.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 12, 2011
1:43 AM

Post #8489276

DD #3 showed me some poppy seeds I gave her last year. I said it was too late to sow them now. I mailed her yesterday about the freezer idea .Hope she has some success.The seeds are annual Heritage ones.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

April 13, 2011
2:23 PM

Post #8493298

Pirl ...are those the names you speak in the shower?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2011
2:39 PM

Post #8493339

No, I'm actually quiet in the shower!
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2011
3:21 PM

Post #8493449

I may, just may, have gotten some poppies this year...not sure yet but I see something that is not a weed. I am not going to jinx it because with my luck the neighbor's cat will pee on them or the bunny will eat them. The bunny just doesn't get the fact that in Winter I let him eat whatever but in Spring he is supposed to leave things alone.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 13, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8493851

Speaking of rabbits. None that live in the wild are bunnies...period. The facts are that in just this year's time period that a doe will produce four to six litters. Each litter will contain four to six new rabbits. Each new rabbit will begin breeding within four to six weeks. From a single doe will come numbers of rabbits that are in fact in the hundreds. Thank goodness they have a high percentage death rate by all possible causes including the intentional disposal at the hands of man.

In my back yard the crows will clean up an unsightly dead rabbit in two days at the most. It must be apparent to anyone that an early in the season loss of a single rabbit is the most beneficial loss to our back yard gardening efforts. There are no tears in my life for the loss of a rabbit. I do have big time difficult neighbor relationships because they are teaching their kids to love the cute little bunnies.

I have raised domesitic rabbits that are relatively easy to care for. They make up fast and are favored food on our table. I no longer mess with them because the farmer's market has them available every week. One rabbit and one chicken a week in our case keeps us off the more expensive grass raised beef and some other meats that may not be as good for our bodies.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
2:15 AM

Post #8494382

We have a cat that cleaned up the rabbits that lived in the raspberry bushes at the border of our property. That patch is popping up in my gardens and slowly taking over my walkway at the back of my border garden.
No rabbits here to speak of.I am also not fond of them.I wont even have a cement one in the garden.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

April 15, 2011
10:37 AM

Post #8497766

Yep rabbits are a major problem. You would think living in the city as I do that they wouldn't be a problem...But last night I saw a half grown rabbit go under the shed. Today , I saw that it had eaten 5 oriental poppy seedlings and a tomatoe seedling that I put out yesterday. Fescue causes rabbits to abort and I have talked to horse breeders who tell me that it also causes horses to abort. I have thought about planting a fescue lawn.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 16, 2011
1:44 AM

Post #8499170

Dont like rabbits here.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 17, 2011
7:51 AM

Post #8501674

We have so many hawks and coyotes that it is quite rare to see a rabbit here - way out in the woods in the middle of Tennessee.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
3:26 PM

Post #8502436

poppy sprouts are getting bigger. Its snowing.UGGG
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 17, 2011
7:08 PM

Post #8502960

You may keep your cotton picking snow. We have had enough. All the rain missed us today except for a thunder storm about nine this evening. It put down some hard rain for a few minutes. Now at ten the sky is clear and the moon is saying Spring.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 19, 2011
3:37 AM

Post #8505719

cold today 33* high of 43* not like last year.
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 19, 2011
4:19 PM

Post #8507174

My daughter sent me a text from Michigan yesterday. They got 3 inches of snow.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 20, 2011
1:45 AM

Post #8508022

KRAPS .Is it ever going to stop?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 20, 2011
6:09 AM

Post #8508398

Just before the last surprise snow, a few weeks ago, I spread the poppies and see them coming up now!
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 20, 2011
11:06 AM

Post #8508961

Mine are up and more or less holding off growth just sitting there at the three or four true leaf stage. They too are waiting for warmer weather.

HazelCrestMikeB

HazelCrestMikeB
Hazel Crest, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 23, 2011
4:11 AM

Post #8514710

I'M also a failure with the indoors grown poppy seeds. Spreaded the annual seeds several weeks ago outside. I see several coming up. Largest established plant so far this spring.

Thumbnail by HazelCrestMikeB
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 23, 2011
5:26 AM

Post #8514868

Thats a handsome example of Oriental Poppy.
I dont bother to start annuals inside.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 23, 2011
10:24 AM

Post #8515422

HazleCrestMikeB, thank you for posting that picture! I have been trying for so long to get some poppies established, especially oriental, only to have them "disappear." But this spring a plant came up that greatly resembled an oriental poppy plant - except that we have a weed here that also resembles them. My plant now looks exactly like the plant in your picture. (I had thought the orientals were more of a grayish-green than the bright green of these.) The only problem now is that mine does not get a whole lot of direct sun. Dare I hope that it will bloom? If it blooms you will hear me shouting way up there in Illinois. I am hopeful because my peony plants do not get a great deal of direct sun. At first they did not bloom well, but now they are getting established and used to the site and are blooming well.

The moral of all this, I think, is to keep trying!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 23, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8515497

Bright greens are usually Orientals especially if they are a bit furry.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 23, 2011
2:29 PM

Post #8515785

It's furry! By George, I think I've got it!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 23, 2011
3:23 PM

Post #8515886

You are the proud owner of a Oriental Poppy.
atta go
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2011
4:23 PM

Post #8516014

I had to move my oritentals last year and I missed the bloom. This year I will get all the ones I moved and the new ones I planted. I can't wait. I just wish one of the thousand or so annual seeds I threw on the snow will actually produce at least one poppy.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 23, 2011
6:47 PM

Post #8516303

I think I'll put up a plaque.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 24, 2011
2:31 AM

Post #8516795

Do you know which variety you planted?
I was walking the edge of my garden that borders the neighbor. There were OP's comming up in his lawn ,about 10 ,scattered.
I must have lost a bucket full of roots when transplanting to my border. He will mow over them I'm sure. Or spike them out with his weeder.
I used to think those plantes were so fragile. NOT.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 24, 2011
1:36 PM

Post #8517780

In my desperation I planted orientale, rhoeas AND somniforem - anything for a poppy!

Can't somebody get the plants that got "spilled?"

If I keep trying sooner or later I will get the conditions just right and get a nice bed of poppies started.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 24, 2011
7:22 PM

Post #8518515

Does this look like HazelCrestMikeB's plant, or what? (A little knocked about by today's storm.)

Thumbnail by Rebeccatowoc
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 25, 2011
1:42 AM

Post #8518810

Thats a nice Oriental Poppy. perennial not annual.
Somnifariums are annual,they cast seeds where they grow so people thinh\k its a perennial but not.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

April 25, 2011
10:28 AM

Post #8519217

One of my Pataty plums seedlings. This was started in the basement , then taaransplanted into cell pacs under lights ,next hardened off by plaving on patio for an hour or two each day finally planteed to garden.

Thumbnail by timeinabottle
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 25, 2011
10:29 AM

Post #8519220

Thank you, ge1836 - now all I have to do is wait for it to bloom. If necessary I will build a greenhouse around it and add lighting (but I hope it's not necessary - I already spent all available funds on spring planting.) At last I, too, have a poppy!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 25, 2011
11:52 AM

Post #8519421

No need to pamper the OP's. They are hardy. They bloom ( maybe not this year ) then the leaves look like the plant is dying and dried up. In a little while you will see the winter growth start. It stays green all winter.
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 25, 2011
4:04 PM

Post #8519986

I grow OP from seed every year. Everything I planted last year is already huge this year. I also ordered more from graceful gardens I love their plants These are the ones I ordered this year.

Thumbnail by bookreader451
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 25, 2011
7:58 PM

Post #8520612

bookreader451, those are absolutely GORGEOUS. I am greener than their leaves with envy. Whenever you happen to have a minute, could you outline for me in words of one syllable how you prepare the soil and sow and cultivate to grow your OP?
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2011
3:34 AM

Post #8520928

I start them indoors in saved plastic sixes. They are deep and you don't disturb the tap when you plant. I keep the seeds in the fridge always then just get a few on a toothpick and scatter. I usually keep them in the basement under lights where it is cooler. I plant new poppies every year and they will bloom the next. The only type that blooms the first year is icelandic, as for annuals...well can't get them to grow at all!

My soil is garden soil from the cow farm. My backyard is full of HUGE rocks.so I used them to outline raised beds and after removing the sod and working what I could I put down about 6 inches of garden soil. The soil is a mixture of topsoil and manure compost and you can grow anything in it. I don't do anything else really. Just let them grow.

Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 26, 2011
7:55 AM

Post #8521388

I am determined to have poppies and so will have to figure out a way to follow this routine. In some ways my garden is already similar to yours. We are on the side of a scoured-off hill and I have had to put in raised beds to be able to grow what I want. Do you think Miracle-Grow garden soil (not the "potting soil") would be similar to your cow farm soil? (Though I could probably find a local cow farm. How old does the manure have to be?)

I am very inexperienced with starting from seed and this will be the hard part. We have a basement but it is the kingdom of the cats. Also gro-lights are expensive. Have to study on this part.

I did not realize that you routinely plant one year for the next year. Thank you so very much, Bookreader, for taking the time to share your experience and knowledge. I promise you will have the first pictures of my BEAUTIFUL poppies!
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2011
5:38 PM

Post #8522624

I bought the five shelf metal racks from Target and I use shop lights they hang from the racks nicely. I use 2 lights per shelf and then when seed starting is over I fill the racks with preserves I make all summer!
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 26, 2011
7:43 PM

Post #8522954

Gro-Lights in the Shop-Light holders?
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 27, 2011
3:03 AM

Post #8523408

I use the regular florecents and they are fine.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 27, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8525228

You guys - guess what, guess what, guess what! It's sending up a bud. It IS an oriental poppy and it's sending up a bud.

Maybe this is routine for some of you, but I have SLAVED for this beast. (I spent nine years in the Arctic with no flowers at all and then moved to new construction and had to start building a garden from bare soil.)

Anyway, I have had so many failures and have made so many mistakes that I am just THRILLED to be having this bloom. (Should I send out birth announcements?)

But it's not perennial, is that right? I have to sow this year to have some bloom next year?
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 27, 2011
8:54 PM

Post #8525405

Pictured here are all of four tomato seedlings and two peppers. They are in official yogert cups being raised under my wife's sewing machine lamp. This lamp is one white ring with a warm florecent in the center. Those new florescent bulbs are fine for me. I used to have hundreds of seedlings. Four of these will make the grade and be around the edge of our patio wall. Everything else will be in a mixture of pots. Bi Jimminy there are no more large gardens to hoe here.

Thumbnail by docgipe
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 29, 2011
1:21 AM

Post #8527736

Rebeccatowoc! your gaining on it.Hang in there. We all have had triumpths like this and share your joy.

HazelCrestMikeB

HazelCrestMikeB
Hazel Crest, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2011
5:52 AM

Post #8527967

Rebecca we are happy for you. Orientals are Perennials as was mentioned earlier in this thread. there is a huge variety of OP out there. As Timeinabottle mentioned, Patty Plum is one that I also planted last year along with Heartbeat, Turkenlouis, Jacinth, Harlem, Manhattan, Shasta. Have two in the basement that came in the mail last week Flamenco and Paradiso. Got some Red Shades from High Country Gardens last year and this thing took off like a WEED (LOL!), so much so I was able to transplant a nice clump between the Turkenlouis. They are all doing well so I am very excited to finally (hopefully) see the new stuff bloom this year and possibly a rebloom from the reported rebloomers. Hope my season here is long enough for a rebloom. Mike

HazelCrestMikeB

HazelCrestMikeB
Hazel Crest, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2011
5:54 AM

Post #8527972

Oh yea, I got Harlem too to add to the NY series.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 29, 2011
7:07 AM

Post #8528133

Thank you, everybody, for your encouragement and advice.

So now that I have one established Oriental, it, at least, will keep coming back each year? I will, of course, sow and plant others, but would like to feel secure of this one.

(Sorry to be anal about it. Hey, one step at a time, right?)
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

April 29, 2011
12:11 PM

Post #8528584

Rebecca O pops are perennials and you will have them forever or therabouts. I love your trial error and try again approach...To me that is the heart of gardening.
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 29, 2011
2:11 PM

Post #8528776

Thank you, timeinabottle. An amazing thing has happened in my garden. Essentially a miracle.

One reason I have had difficulty getting things established is that we are in the middle of the woods and sunlight is in short supply. The recent storm, during all the terror in the middle of the night, took out a huge maple that had been weakened, first by a drought and then by borers. The maple pushed over two smaller trees with it as it fell.

The result is that a corridor of sunlight has been opened into the heart of the garden. No garden plants were hurt or touched in the process. The crashing limbs landed about eight inches away from a large bed of sedum, and obliterated a place from which just last week I had moved some tiarella to a new location. Even the tall, gangly, purple columbine just opening was unharmed.

Now I have a bright sunny location for more oriental poppies and other beautiful plants. I don't know why we have received this blessing while others were badly hurt in the same storm. In the past, sometimes we have suffered and others, not. Among the many splendors that a garden represents, it also illustrates the omnipotence of God, the complexity of his purposes, and the infinity of his grace.
bookreader451
Troy, NY
(Zone 5b)

April 29, 2011
6:30 PM

Post #8529257

They just get bigger and better every year. Congradulations
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2011
4:05 AM

Post #8529714

Nothing at all wrong with the plant, fuss it and lose it only to try again. There are so many ways we lose a plant or seedling that I highly suspect many just do not even consider a loss a special issue because it seems to go on and on from year to year. When and if I have multiple losses with the same plant I tend to try some other similar plant. Elimination of the difficult or marginal plants in my patch is a "goes with" on page one of my gardening book. Most gardeners have some problems. Those who say they don't lie about their sex lives too. ]:o)
mwhit
Tiffin, OH
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2011
4:18 PM

Post #8530876

Doc, You are so right!! I don't consider a plant a true failure unless I've managed to kill it at least 2 or3 times! Even then I'll probably try it again-I guess gardeners are gluttons for punishment! Add that to the fact that we always crave that which we cannot have and it's no wonder ordinary people think we are a bit odd!!
A case in point: I started this thread a little more than a year ago, since then I have sowed poppy seed in fall, some more in winter and see NOTHING yet! I hit the greenhouses today and bought a potted poppy (unnamed "mix" with 2-3 crowns) and just planted it tonight. My plan is to keep trying until I have poppies, darn it!
It was so nice of everyone who contributed to the thread for sharing their wisdom and experience with me and keeping my hopes alive. I will purchase fresh seed in fall and try winter sowing again. If I have any success I will share pictures here with everyone!! MW
Rebeccatowoc
Stewart, TN

April 30, 2011
6:53 PM

Post #8531200

Hey, mwhit - believe me, if I can get one, you can get one. I failed for years in three different states before you even started this thread. You will be so happy when your poppies are blooming, and I can't wait to see your pictures!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2011
2:03 AM

Post #8531595

hang in there

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Other Poppies Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Poppy reference sources (and pictures too) balvenie 29 Oct 7, 2009 11:38 PM
Oriental poppies - seed or root stock? ghia_girl 15 Jun 22, 2010 12:12 AM
Starting to grow mrpoppy 3 Mar 6, 2007 12:46 AM
Meconopsis from seed picante 42 Oct 12, 2008 7:15 PM
7b-ers who are going to sow soon sublimaze1 7 Mar 9, 2007 7:36 PM


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