What Caucidiforms do we have? Hardy or not.

Mountlake Terrace, WA(Zone 8a)

I have
Beaucarnea recurvata
Dioscoria mexicana
Drimia harworthoides
Haemanthus albiflos
Ledebouria socialis
Massonia cf depressa Totally dormant now, I have a pot of dirt.
Orinthogalum caudatum
Pelargonium cotyledonis
Pelargonium alterans
Pelargonium worchesterae
Pelargonium gibbosum
Pelargonium sidoidies
Pseudobombax ellipticum
Sinnigia longatuba
Uncarina decaryi

and I am trying to grow from seed:
Orinthogalium hirsuitum
Ceropega bulbosum

Outside
Cyclamen coum
Cyclamen hederifolium

Most live in the windowsill or near a bay window., but the plants are out growining the space, and I need a greenhouse soon.

I suggest we acquaint others with our plants and growing conditions as that will help knowing what's up.

Akron, OH(Zone 5a)

Nice list! How old are the plants?

My biggest treasure is Pachypodium lamerei, 6-7 y.o. Overwinters great inside without loosing the leaves. Will try to post the pics later. Also:
Pachypodium saundersii and rosulatum, 3-4 y.o. and Adenium obesum. They all loose most of the leaves over winter but green up happily in spring.
Beaucarnea recurvata, the easiest to grow.

A couple of weeks ago I started Adenium seeds and already got the first seedlings. Would love to try other seeds as well and will appreciate all anyone could share.

Mountlake Terrace, WA(Zone 8a)

My Haemanthus, Unicarnia and C hederifolium I have owned about 5 years. The Beaucarnia about 10 years. The others are relatively new to me.although before the great freeze and depression I had had some before: Pseudobombax, Leadbouria,

I just uprooted my C hederifolium, repotted and watered it with about an inch of soil on top. It will be an outside plant for now as that has been its life until now.The caudex was about 6 inches down when I found it. Bihrmann's shows the caudex exposed, but I doubt in one operation.

Arlington, TX

Dorstenia gigas is what I am dreaming of. I have read a few articles and seen some cool pics of it but the few places that sell the plant want more than I am willing to pay at the moment. Does anyone have one of these?
Cheryl

Copenhagen, Denmark(Zone 7b)

Cheryl,

I have had two Dorstenia gigas. The biggest one (12 inches tall) was attacked my snails (!) last summer and later rotted. It was a terrible loss - after five years of nursing.

The species is a rarity in the succulent nurseries in Europe but last year the renowned Specks Exotica in Germany had a few for sale. Tiny seedlings for 40-50 USD a piece!

Regards,

Martin

Copenhagen, Denmark(Zone 7b)

Three years ago I had 40-45 different species. Now I am down to about 25 - but I will probably buy some new plants again soon. ;-) Adeniums, that is.

Adenia glauca
Adenium arabicum
Adenium obesum
Adenium obesum hybrids
Adenium somalense
Brighamia insignis
Bursera fagaroides
Commiphora species (a few)
Crassula ovata
Cyphostemma juttae
Cyphostemma laza
Cyphostemma sandersonii
Dioscorea mexicana
Fockea edulis
Gerrardanthus macrorhizus
Jatropha multifida (Coral Plant)
Operculicarya decaryi
Pachypodium brevicaule
Pachypodium saundersii
Pelargonium cotyledonis
Phytolacca dioica (Ombu Tree)
Plectranthus ernstii
Trichodiadema densum
Uncarina grandidieri
Uncarina roeoesliana
Uncarina turicana

Regards,

Martin

This message was edited Apr 11, 2010 9:58 PM

Arlington, TX

Which adenium is your favorite Martin? I would like to try some new species and have been reading about a few of them. Also, which are the easiest?
Cheryl

Decatur, GA

Cheryl,
I have several small D. gigas I got online for $10 plus shipping. They are touchy about watering. They can easily dry up or rot. But one is going gangbusters and I am hoping for the best.
Helen
PS. Martin I feel you pain.

Copenhagen, Denmark(Zone 7b)

Cheryl,

Adenium socotranum is definitely my favourite but the species is slow-growing and prone to rot. I have lost two.:-( The species requires lots of sun and high temperatures to grow. Something I can't give it.

Adenium obesum hybrids are probably the easiest to grow - some even bloom indoors in my (cold) region. But it all comes down to genetics and your growing conditions (light intensity and temperature).

"TX" means Texas? I have never been in the States but Texas sounds sunny and hot.;-) If so I guess all species and hybrids would thrive there.

I grow Adeniums from seeds myself. This way I can select the ones growing faster, more stocky and compact or bloom more easily - the ones most "fit"/adapted to my growing conditions. When I buy Adeniums in flowering size, I can't be sure if they will ever adapt to my conditions here at home.

Regards,

Martin

Mountlake Terrace, WA(Zone 8a)

Caucidiforms from seed. Tell me more, I would like to grow my own plants. Especially not Adeniums. the others.

Arlington, TX

Martin,
Yes it means TX but where I live its not hot in the winter months. It is usually very dry and hot during the summer and much of spring and fall but we do have a winter here. This winter was also wet and colder than normal so I lost a lot of my cactus. I am new to keeping these plants so I will stay away from those that are more difficult to keep alive. Do you grow the arabicums? I want to try a couple new types this summer.
Thanks for the information,
Cheryl

Akron, OH(Zone 5a)

I like to start plants from seeds and had 100% success with Pachypodium saundersii and posulatum. Got the seeds on the internet, very affordable and very easy to grow. Yes, they are rather slow growing but I enjoy watching them getting bigger and thicker every season. I would definityly try other seeds to if had chance and now I'm busy with adeniums.

Copenhagen, Denmark(Zone 7b)

Cheryl,

I overwinter my Adeniums at about 50 F - the more rot prone at 60 F (A. somalense). This requires a "dry dormancy". Below 50 F it gets critical. Some hybrids and A. arabicum can tolerate low temperatures (when not watered!) but I wouldn't count on that.

I still have a few A. arabicums (some rotted) but growth is especially slow here. They always leaf out later than my others Adeniums and they never bloom.

With the hot growing season in your region you could definitely grow some nice plants fast. When they are actively growing, treat them as tropicals and water a lot.:-)

Regards,

Martin

Copenhagen, Denmark(Zone 7b)

It is so much fun growing caudiciforms or pachycauls from seeds yourself. Everyone can buy big showy plants and stick them in pots but in my opinion it's a greater achievement to raise plants from seeds and end up with specimen. No offence - I buy plants myself.;-)

If you are into bonsai you can give the plants an early "training" using wirering, pruning and leaf-removal. Seedlings of many caudiciform species are well-suited and handle the training pretty well.

Personally I am into "micro bonsai" (well, recently) - keeping the plants especially small.:-) I am working on a few plants now - Operculicarya decaryi and Bursera fagaroides (and Adeniums) among others. Very fun indeed - often with quick results.

Regards,

Martin

Mountlake Terrace, WA(Zone 8a)

But is special treatment necessary for them? I am not having very good luck with germination.

Arlington, TX

Martin,
What do you start with to make your mini bonsai? What techniques do you use other than branch pruning to make the caudex fat but short? I have some small bonsai pots and would like to start some small adenium for them.
C

Sun Lakes, AZ(Zone 9a)

I also have some mini bonsai pots that I bought years ago when I worked at a garden center in MA. I'd love to do mini bonsai also so would love to hear your response to Cheryl's questions.

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