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Winter Sowing: Transplant Time

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 24, 2010
6:56 PM

Post #7734091

I have been transplanting small plants like crazy!
Antirrhinum braun blanquetii: 70
Larkspur: 71
Columbine 'McKenna Giants': 99
Margarita Shasta: 50
Chrysanthemum 'Primrose Yellow': 24
Candytuft: 66
Petunia 'Rainmaster': 50
Heliotrope: 30
Torenia: 131
Antirrhinum 'Appleblossom'; 86
I am putting a lot of them in this:
I really like this; it works really well. I put two to four in each square. They tear apart in groups of fours.

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blkraven2
Wells, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 24, 2010
7:56 PM

Post #7734269

nice... I make newspaper pots for mine while watching tv in the evenings.. that way I can plant pot and all.. they are about a 3x3 in in size or I can make them bigger if needed...heres my system

This message was edited Apr 24, 2010 9:57 PM

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hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

April 25, 2010
1:37 PM

Post #7735989

Okay, here's my dumb question of the day - why do you do this? Just to separate them so you can plant them in different areas rather plant than a "hunk o seedling"? Or do you give them away? I don't know if I'd have the patience though I think it's a great idea and the newspaper pots are cute.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 25, 2010
2:08 PM

Post #7736079

blk: Your newspaper pots are great. I don' know how to make the pots, but have heard about them. It's definitely better to be able to plant your pot. I feel over whelmed just getting all those little plants planted. I couldn't possibly make the pots as well. The tray of units only costs $1.19 so it's worth it to me to have the units.

hansey: I ask myself why do I do it? I just really hate to throw plants away. They would all turn into very pretty plants. Plus, it's so much easier for me to "sit" down and pull the plants apart at a table than to sit out on the ground with the wind blowing, the sun burning, and trying to pull the plants apart. My soil has been so terrifically dry up until yesterday, that I had to use so much force to just make a little hole for my little plant and then the soil was like little rocks to bring the soil around the stem. So, I decided to "plant" the plants, and then they would at least have a little soil around the root to get them started. Either I had ground like a rock, or in other areas, it was like sand -- so dry. That's why I started putting them in little pots. They needed to be taken out of the WS container as they were too crowded and getting spindly and yet, the ground was less than desirable to plant in. The soil has been amended better in some of my gardens than others. Where they had been amended, the soil was like sand. Where the soil had not been amended, the soil was like rocks. Now that it has finally rained, two inches, it will be easier to get my little plants out of the WS containers and get them in the ground.
I know you are suppose to be able to plant a hunk of plants, but I just don't have very good luck doing it that way. I see one plant and then another and another.
I have soooo many plants this year. I think I will try to take them to the local Farmer's Market and try to peddle them to get rid of them. When you see iberis semipervirens, candytuft, and it's selling for $4.50 to $5.50 each, and you have 66, it's hard to just plant a hunk of them.
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

April 29, 2010
5:13 PM

Post #7749506

Dumb question but what is the container that you have your seeds planted in? Is there a website you purchased these from? Do you "grow under lights" or WS outdoors? If these are used to WS outdoors, can I assume that you place these units in a clear, "Sterlite" container?Do these units come with drainage holes in them alread? I planted about two large blanket/sweater box in coffee cups and cold drink cups and they were failures. Right now, I'm saying nothing but milk jugs next year for me and only as many as I have milk crates to sit them in. Being my first year trying WS, I was overwhelmed as I'd only planted a few things from seeds before(marigold, calendula, daisy). I can now appreciate the starter plants found in the Garden centers even more.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

April 29, 2010
6:08 PM

Post #7749690

Many experienced wintersowers do prefer milk jugs over all others. I do. Two liters work well, too, but they blow over easily. I only use them corralled in something else.

Karen
blkraven2
Wells, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 29, 2010
6:30 PM

Post #7749768

what I do is I start my seeds in paper egg cartons in plastic tubs outside.. then after they are big enough and are ready to be thinnned I transplant them into the paper pots I make.. then they go back into the plastic tubs till time to plant then pot and all goes into the ground.. I do it because it allows me to maximize what Ive grown and when I finally do plant them it allows me to "see" where things will be .. yes they were WS, I started them mid feb for my area..I keep the lids on them most of the time but if its in the 40s Ill remove them so I have air flow and dont get damping off or anything like that.. I got the tubs at target, they have no drainage holes.. Ive had real good luck like this and I ended up with about 300 seedlings this spring to plant.. Im already planning for next year to do the same thing only more.. I make the paper pots in the evening when I watch TV starting in Dec so when its time I have them already done.. okay did I answer everything ?...lol..
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 29, 2010
7:19 PM

Post #7749931

Pippi: I bought my units at the local garden center. I set mine outside on my deck. No protection from wind etc. I use two Liter Soda bottles, some 32 oz soda glasses and even small 12 oz. (or whatever) glasses from Panera. They are clear; I use the lids. It depends on how many plants I want as to what size I use. Using smaller containers allows me to be more limiting with the amount of seeds I sow as well as save on soil. I go through a lot of seed starting soil! Sometimes, I make two or three soda bottles for one kind of plant depending on how many of that paticular plant I want. I transplanted a lot of stuff when it was too cold, too wet, too early etc to plant outside. I would do it at my kitchen table where it was warm on a cheap vinyl tablecloth. Then, put it all away when I finished.
Enough, I ramble.
The containers have drain holes. The seeds had been winter sown and when transplanted, they go back outside on my deck. They can be divided into fours and easily pull apart.
I don't have trouble with my containers blowing away. We had 35 mph gusts today. Everything is fine. I guess it must be pretty protected?? I'll take a picture tomorrow. It's too late now.
I don't know if your were asking raven or me for the planting units. They both seem to work well. But, this is what I do, and I hope I have answered your questions.
rockgardner
Billerica, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 29, 2010
7:23 PM

Post #7749951



This message was edited May 30, 2010 11:46 AM
blkraven2
Wells, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 30, 2010
10:25 AM

Post #7751357

I dont think they hold up well enough but they might ...also I prefer to use a smaller container when starting.. by doing that it allows the roots to get established.. besides I need to have something to do to keep me from going crazy..lol..and I enjoy doing the transplanting
rockgardner
Billerica, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2010
11:36 AM

Post #7751523



This message was edited May 30, 2010 11:46 AM
blkraven2
Wells, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 30, 2010
2:45 PM

Post #7751982

it would take me over a year to get enough milk jugs .. I dont drink that much either..lol.. it has worked well for me and the thing I like about it is you dont have a gazilion milk jugs to deal with..lol.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

April 30, 2010
3:38 PM

Post #7752107

I got over 200 jugs from Starbucks last fall which was super - for this year, I am washing out the milk jugs (like 1-3/week) we use, cutting them in half (so I can stack them and I'll hinge them on both sides) and going to store them in a small area. Having a ROOM FULL of milk jugs just was too much chaos for me, haaaaa.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 30, 2010
3:41 PM

Post #7752119

I just go to the re-cycle center when I am ready to WS. They may not be an option for everyone.
blkraven2
Wells, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 30, 2010
3:55 PM

Post #7752176

my place is way to small to have that many jugs around.. the nice thing about the tubs is they stack easily and take up a lot less room. and after Im done they only take a small area to store. after I sow I can stack them on top of each other when they have the lids on ... when all is said and done its just easier for me..but what ever works for a person is the best way to go..
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2010
6:18 AM

Post #7753736

It's just me and my husband here and we don't use much milk, either. But the rest of the world seems to use a lot and I've never had a problem getting them. I start collecting them in fall and always have more than enough.

Karen
rockgardner
Billerica, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2010
12:15 PM

Post #7754558



This message was edited May 30, 2010 11:46 AM

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onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 1, 2010
12:31 PM

Post #7754585

I saved some of the smaller ones from the grape tomatoes
rockgardner
Billerica, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2010
12:37 PM

Post #7754594



This message was edited May 30, 2010 11:47 AM

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rockgardner
Billerica, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2010
12:53 PM

Post #7754635



This message was edited May 30, 2010 11:47 AM

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critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 1, 2010
10:09 AM

Post #8010977

I haven't had a lot of luck with the HOS method, either, partly because my plants just don't get watched closely enough when I put them out in the wild blue yonder, and a hunk of little seedlings is fairly likely to wilt from lack of water, get munched by bugs, or be overgrown by some weed.

I prefer to pot up WS seedlings. They get watered during the summer and planted out in fall or the following spring. by then, they are sturdy plants with nice established roots. (At least that's the theory.. I do have a few older pots still waiting to be planted out in the garden, LOL.)
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

August 1, 2010
11:30 AM

Post #8011154

You know, Critterologist, this was my first year and I have to agree. My HOS ended up strangling each other out or were so dense the slugs/and/pillbugs ate them off at the roots. I think next year I'll pot them up and let them establish themselves before putting them in the ground. I agree with you!
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 1, 2010
1:23 PM

Post #8011369

I think different things work for different people. I know some folks do really well with the HOS method. You could always split the difference if you have a nice big clump of WS seedlings... split off a few little clumps to pot up and then plant the rest out as a HOS.
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

December 9, 2010
3:03 PM

Post #8252184

I'll stick to wintersowing using milk jugs, but it's always interesting to see what works for others. We have a lot of options and as I look around in the grocery store, I find myself looking at things that could be used for wintersowing. There's always the containers used in the deli(salads,etc.) the gal. jugs of bottled water, then there's the bakery that is so enticing and calls my name loud and clear. Then there are the clear containers that Crystal light tea comes in. In the produce dept. there are some pre-packaged foods in clear plastic containers. Nuts, and candies, and don't foget the salad bar and dairy sections. Think about it and look around the next time you go grocery shopping. Open your eyes to all the containers that could be used for WS. You'll be amazed how many there are out there! Think Wintersowing!
weedyseedy
Warners, NY

December 15, 2010
10:00 AM

Post #8261656

My wife thought I'd lost my mind when I bought one container of grapes after another----I now have over thirty of those containers with holes already top and bottom----all I grew last year was some Echinacea and orange milkweed because I was really sceptical here-------things thaw and refreeze and I never had a cold frame work right, but it worked fairly well, so now maybe a few perennials----------------Weedy
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

December 18, 2010
5:43 AM

Post #8266202

Quoting:all I grew last year was some Echinacea and orange milkweed because I was really sceptical here-------things thaw and refreeze and I never had a cold frame work right, but it worked fairly well, so now maybe a few perennials----------------

Go for it, Weedy! You've got the containers! Try more perennials, and maybe even some hardy annuals! And then report back on how it went.

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


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