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Invasive Plants: Get Rid of the Bad Trumpet Vine

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Ret_Sgt_Yates
Sparta , TN
(Zone 7a)

July 2, 2010
2:14 PM

Post #7938479

Need Help folks !

How do you Get Rid of the Bad Trumpet Vine from landscaping areas ?


It's Bad and Every where . at a friends Place !
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 2, 2010
2:16 PM

Post #7938483

Hand-pulling and Roundup are all the weapons I know of - it's a beast in my yard, too - I keep fighting it and have learned to check for it every day.
Ret_Sgt_Yates
Sparta , TN
(Zone 7a)

July 2, 2010
2:26 PM

Post #7938507

I need two options one for NO flowers .


and one with Flowers .

Please.

Sarge
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 2, 2010
3:04 PM

Post #7938582

The same as my previous response - it's a demon to get rid of!
PappysMa
Aiken, SC

July 9, 2010
4:00 PM

Post #7955855

I am new to Dave's Garden. I happened upon the forum discussion off the internet regarding the
trumpet vine which I planted in the spring of 2009; one plant to grow up a pergola next to my home
and the other to grow up the front of the pergola. After a little more than a year the plants were lush
and growing nicely, however, I kept wondering when they would start to produce flowers. I started
reading the forum and got sick to my stomach as I had no idea this plant was so invasive and destructive and extremely difficult to destroy. I jumped up and ran outside with my clippers and chopped the plants down. My husband and I then tried to dig up the root which was approx 3/4" in diameter. We could not get to the base of the root as it was now growing under our deck. I read in the forum about a product called "Vine-X Vine and Brush Control. I have spent hours on the internet trying to find out where I can purchase Vine X to no avail. Does anyone have any info - it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. PappysMa.
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 9, 2010
5:43 PM

Post #7956068

Here is a link to a google.com search I did - you should find it for about $20/pint online.

http://www.arborchem.com/products.asp?uid=1098&p=12

This message was edited Jul 10, 2010 6:26 AM
PappysMa
Aiken, SC

July 10, 2010
5:03 AM

Post #7956861

Which link is that re: Vine-X?
pastime
Waterman, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 10, 2010
5:41 AM

Post #7956939

I see Round-Up has made a product for vines. Round-Up for Poison Ivy. If it will kill poison ivy vines it should work on a Trumpet vine also.

I tried to warn my baby sister when she planted a TV next to her deck three years ago. She didn't listen. The thing is engulfing the arbor, the deck railings, and headed for her kitchen. She's going to have some real troubles soon.
Ret_Sgt_Yates
Sparta , TN
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2010
5:44 AM

Post #7956943

you will be happy to know it is workingfor us and my friends they are findly getting the misarbly thing under con-troll
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2010
9:06 AM

Post #7957334

Retired, can you specify which product is 'working for us'. Thanks!
Ret_Sgt_Yates
Sparta , TN
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2010
7:51 PM

Post #7958657

Vine-X,
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2010
10:47 PM

Post #7959027

Pastime, if that blasted vine gets under your sister's house, as it did mine in VA, she will never be rid of it. It kept sending out runners everywhere; kill one, six more sprout nearby. The thing may be native, but it's purely evil.
Ruth
pastime
Waterman, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2010
5:52 AM

Post #7959314

I know it's evil too. My DD is a horticulturist, and my sis doesn't listen to her either. I couldn't believe the size of the thing when I was there over the 4th. I just shook my head when I saw it. I could pound lumps in her head, maybe then she'll listen, but she's bigger than me. I could hit and run!
Ret_Sgt_Yates
Sparta , TN
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2010
6:55 PM

Post #7961234

Try Gly 4 or Eraser from Co- op or Tractor Supply

Sarge
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2010
8:58 PM

Post #7961527

Why must people always learn the hard way? Such a stupid, not to mention inefficient, system. And I've done so myself many times, I'm afraid.
PappysMa
Aiken, SC

July 12, 2010
6:45 PM

Post #7963790

KayJones - Thanks for your info re: Vine X. FYI I learned from my local Fertilizer and Chemical
agent that the main ingredient of Vine X is Triclopry. You can buy generic Triclopry and the price
is $18.00 per quart. Thanks again.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2010
6:19 AM

Post #7964565

I just bought a TV - I assume the best thing to do is keep it in a container on the deck and not put it in the ground. Sounds like it is impossible to get rid of, so it's not going in the yard. How do they fare being contained and will it make it through the winter if I leave it contained? I don't want to bring in any plants this year as I suffered through fungal gnats allllllll last winter. They were invasive to my home, lol.
pastime
Waterman, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2010
6:53 AM

Post #7964647

As mean and tough as TV is, it will probably survive in a container over winter. Your container may not if it's ceramic or pottery. It could crack from the freezing and thawing. Try putting it in your garage or under a deck or some other protected area.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2010
8:09 AM

Post #7964847

I can put it under the deck, or even bury the container in the ground for the winter - I hear that works well for keeping the roots warm.

I was going to put it in the corner of my yard until I read this thread - it sounds like they are awfully hard to get rid of once you plant it. Not going to chance it.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 14, 2010
12:02 AM

Post #7966992

Cynthia, if you bury the pot underground for winter, be sure to close off drainage hole; trumpet vine spreads by underground runners, and could escape out the drainage hole before you dig it up in spring. I never could get rid of it once it spread under the deck and foundation of our house; sadly had to pass that problem on to the next owner, which I hate to do. Not for lack of trying to kill the blasted thing...
Ruth
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

July 14, 2010
5:59 AM

Post #7967281

Oh my gosh, Ruth, seriously, it's that bad?????? I never dreamed it could escape out the drainage holes! Thank you for telling me. I think it'll sit on the deck in its pot - if it makes it, fine - if not, well, trash... I am so glad I read this thread before I planted it in my flower garden in the backyard! Wonder why nurseries can still sell it if it is so invasive?
Ret_Sgt_Yates
Sparta , TN
(Zone 7a)

July 14, 2010
7:21 AM

Post #7967458

I have seen frindships ruined due to this vine LOL .

; > (
Sarge
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

July 14, 2010
12:31 PM

Post #7968329

Wow, it must be one bad vine! I think it'll live on my deck in a potter so there's no way it can spread. I assume since it spreads under the ground, I don't need to worry about it seeding from the flowers? How can a vine be soooo bad, yikes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 14, 2010
1:33 PM

Post #7968457

Oh, yes - it will toss seeds into the wind and settle anywhere and everywhere. I would like to suggest you look into another type of trumpet vine - Bignonia capreolata. You WILL have to bring it in during the fall/winter, but it's a much better-behaved vine.
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

July 14, 2010
2:09 PM

Post #7968553

I think when mine arrives, I'll just trash it - I don't want the seeds to go anywhere, much less into a neighbor's yard.

The one I have coming is a Campsis radicans Flava (Yellow Trumpet Vine) - Plant - I assume this one is very invasive? It's yellow - the DG guide on it doesn't show any negatives but I'm really scared of it now!

Rats as I spent $25 on them!!!

This message was edited Jul 14, 2010 3:14 PM
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 14, 2010
3:32 PM

Post #7968712

The yellow isn't nearly as invasive, in my experience with it - don't know why, except that it takes a looooong time for it to start blooming. You just have to keep it as you do the orange - contained on concrete!

Why not offer the orange to someone who has lots of acreage - it's thrilling to sit and watch the hummingbirds eat the nectar. You will do fine with it if you keep it contained and pick off the green seed pods and dispose of them - not sure the best way to dispose of them. In order to keep the seed pods under control, you won't be able to let it get taller than you can safely reach.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 14, 2010
11:28 PM

Post #7969724

I echo Kay in that the yellow is not as invasive, though it's still very "vigorous." I wouldn't risk growing either one after the horrid experience with the orange one, but that's just me. I've planted Bignonia here, and am so much happier with it!
Ruth
hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

July 15, 2010
3:57 AM

Post #7969805

I only have yellow ones ordered, no orange, so I am thankful. Will keep it in a pot on the deck and pick off the seed pods so it can't seed. Since it won't be in full sun, I'm not too worried about it going crazy and if it does, trash can here it comes, lol!

I am so glad I read this before I planted any in the ground - we have a white vinyl fence that would look gorgeous with vines on it. Ruth, I'll check the Bignonia and see how that does here in Missouri.

I appreciate your advice!!!
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 15, 2010
5:22 AM

Post #7969885

Bignonia is rated for zone 6b in the ground, so it would require lots of mulch over the winter. It would be much easier to just haul the pot in or put it under your southside porch, if you have one.
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 15, 2010
5:25 AM

Post #7969890

Here is a picture of my Bignonia, growing up a tree in my yard (I have 4 of these vines in my yard):

Thumbnail by KayJones
Click the image for an enlarged view.

hanseycollie
Cynthia (N. Kansas C, MO
(Zone 5b)

July 15, 2010
8:12 AM

Post #7970239

Oh that is gorgeous! I have added it to my "want" list for next spring! It is beautiful - as pretty as the TV only non-invasive!? Yippee!

My plants came today and they are about to go into a pot and on my deck. If nothing else, it's a pretty vine. I will definitely keep it well contained! I'm almost scared of the plant, haaaaaaaaaaa.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 15, 2010
11:18 PM

Post #7972014

You'll be much happier with the Bignonia on your fence, believe me. Or a native honeysuckle, for that matter, if they work in your zone. The hummingbirds are all over our Lonicera sempervirens/native honeysuckle these days. Good luck-
Ruth
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

August 27, 2010
6:57 AM

Post #8065063

According to the Vine-X website, they are out of business. Anyone know where to purchase the generic version????
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 27, 2010
10:52 PM

Post #8066513

What's the active chemical in Vine-X? Something similar happened a year or so ago, when BrushBGone disappeared. Now I have to look for triclopyr as the active ingredient instead; BrushBGone was SO much easier to remember...
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

August 28, 2010
3:59 AM

Post #8066596

The main chemical in vine-x is Triclopry.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 29, 2010
12:35 AM

Post #8068170

You can substitute Ortho Max Poison Ivy & Tough Brush Killer. There are probably other brand names as well; just look at the ingredients for those with triclopyr as the active chemical.
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

August 31, 2010
12:48 PM

Post #8072959

Thanks!!!
sherman99
Menifee, CA
(Zone 9a)

September 16, 2010
5:02 PM

Post #8103014

Could someone please tell me the scientific name of the orange trumpet vine you are talking about?
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 17, 2010
12:00 AM

Post #8103583

The "evil" trumpet vine is Campsis radicans; native to both US and China, but truly a thug. The benign alternative is Bignonia capreolata: native, equally pretty and very well-behaved.
sherman99
Menifee, CA
(Zone 9a)

September 17, 2010
8:40 AM

Post #8104046

thank you.
cowpea123
Coushatta, LA

September 17, 2010
7:17 PM

Post #8105081

Plant a trumpet vine on a pole in the middle of a lawn so it dosen't spread to flower beds.You can keep the suckers mowed down.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 18, 2010
12:37 AM

Post #8105414

Cowpea, your Louisiana climate is very different from what we had in northern VA, but we also tried the mowing approach there. What we got was more suckers, every time, moving out from where we mowed. The thing acted like Sherman marching to the sea; and once we started hacking at it and spraying it, it never flowered again. Gave no pleasure, and trashed every bed it reached; I wouldn't plant it again for love or money.
Ruth
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

September 18, 2010
4:43 AM

Post #8105489

Mine is the same way Ruth. I had a dear friend give it to me and I never imagined in a million years that I would have so much trouble with it. Its suckers have gone under my fence and into my neighbors yard. They even come up under his backyard deck. What a mess.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 19, 2010
12:23 AM

Post #8106976

Wow, hemlady, it's just as bad in a colder climate? It is purely evil. So many sources recommend it; they have got to be kidding.
Ruth
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

September 19, 2010
4:15 AM

Post #8107043

Yes Ruth, its horrible. The only place it hasn't done that is at our cabin in northern Michigan. I took a piece of it up there many years ago and it just won't grow there. The winter is too cold I guess.
cowpea123
Coushatta, LA

September 19, 2010
4:20 AM

Post #8107045

The one i grow is the cultivar flava and i don't think it's as vigorous species.Also madame galen hybrid isn't bad about suckering.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 19, 2010
11:57 PM

Post #8109060

That's good to know, cowpea. I'd heard that 'flava' is less aggressive, but have on occasion had unfortunate results when I trusted that sales pitch. For example, the supposedly well-named 'Miss Manners' Obedient plant spread like wildfire on our sunny slope, lol. We tend to have rainy springs here in western NC, and the garden in general loves it; the aggressive plants love it too well!
Ruth
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

September 20, 2010
5:13 AM

Post #8109173

I had no idea what species my vine was because it was given to me as a gift and back 20 years ago I knew nothing about trumpet vines. Sure wish I had known.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 20, 2010
5:29 AM

Post #8109194

Amen to that, hemlady; mine came in a mixed pack of native wildflower seeds. There's a mistake I'll never make again!
Ruth
daylilydreams
small town, MN
(Zone 4b)

October 24, 2010
9:04 AM

Post #8173052

Does anyone know if you use a brush killer on TV will it kill only the TV or will it also kill or harm nearby plants?

I need to get rid of TV in my prennial garden and not harm the other plants.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 25, 2010
1:57 AM

Post #8174431

Triclopyr is the active ingredient in most brush killers I've used, and it's quite effective against trumpet vine. Unfortunately, it's a strong and broad-spectrum herbicide. You need to be careful to avoid spraying foliage of desirable plants (I use the "glove of death" approach in closely planted areas to avoid this), and also be aware in making plans for later planting that triclopyr has a longer residual effect in the soil than, say, RoundUp does. Great chemical, but needs to be used with respect.
daylilydreams
small town, MN
(Zone 4b)

October 25, 2010
8:00 AM

Post #8174858

Thanks for your reply. I don't plan on spraying it, instead sticking individual single cut vine tips into small bottles with a small hole punched in the lids which will be secured to a metal trellis letting the vine consume the brush killer on it's own for a day or possibly two. Do you think this will work without getting much in the soil?
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 25, 2010
11:56 PM

Post #8176572

Oh, it should work, daylilydreams, but sounds like a lot of work and not really necessary; the foliage doesn't need to be in prolonged contact with the chemical. To use the "glove of death" approach (which also avoids soil contamination), designate a cheap small tumbler and sponge for this purpose, don rubber gloves, mix up a small amount of chemical in the tumbler and use the sponge to apply to foliage. It's easy and no contamination of soil or desirable plants. Good luck with whatever method you try!
Ruth
daylilydreams
small town, MN
(Zone 4b)

October 26, 2010
7:59 AM

Post #8176931

Thanks for all the information Ruth! I thought the TV would still leave residue in the soil from the roots as it must take up some of the chemical to bite the dust. Will this kill the TV that is sprouting in other spots or do I have to treat each spot where it is trying to grow?
Betty
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 27, 2010
12:23 AM

Post #8178709

Betty, it depends on whether the other trumpet vine sprouts/tendrils/whatever are root suckers or separate seedlings. It's a plant that loves to root sucker, and the chemical absorbed by one sprout will have a slight effect on nearby suckers, but no effect on separate plants. When I was taught the glove of death approach, I was told to just wet my gloved hands and stroke the foliage to wet it, but I found this produced drops landing on the soil, and was worried about its residual effect. I discovered that "baptizing" the foliage with a sponge results in less chemical landing on the soil.
Ruth
daylilydreams
small town, MN
(Zone 4b)

October 27, 2010
7:22 AM

Post #8179113

Thanks once again for the information Ruth. I made up a word document with all the info and will try you method next spring as it is snowing here today.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 28, 2010
12:39 AM

Post #8180798

Next spring sounds like a plan, Betty. In your zone, the vine is probably going/gone dormant for the winter, and the chemical wouldn't have the desired effect. Good luck-
Ruth
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

October 28, 2010
5:51 AM

Post #8180962

I tried the sponge painting on all my suckers this spring. They looked like they died for awhile but by mid summer were all green again. I have even tried burning them out with a propane weed torch, with no effect. A state inspector who comes to inspect my daylilies once a year, told me I have to kill the main vine. He told me to cut it down as far as I can to ground level and then pour roundup directly on it. I hate to kill the main vine because the hummers and orioles love it but I have to think of my neighbor. He has my suckers coming up through his backyard deck and he is not too happy about that.
daylilydreams
small town, MN
(Zone 4b)

October 28, 2010
7:30 AM

Post #8181143

Thanks for your message Hemlady wish I would have know about this last spring as my TV died back at the main vine and I could have put roundup on it at the source. I didn't thinking it was dead then all of a sudden it started growing. I know the hummers love it but it has to many suckers. I have a Dropmore honeysuckle that attracks the hummers better and much longer as it blooms here from early spring until fall plus it never suckers. We feed the orioles grape jelly they love it so much they even bring their babies feed them, there are quite a few folks around here that feed the grape jelly.
Betty
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 29, 2010
1:34 AM

Post #8182507

Have to agree, Betty, though I understand your viewpoint, hemlady. We have hummers in the garden virtually all season thanks to native honeysuckles, agastache, and various other perennials. The trumpet vine is just too aggressive for my taste, and I keep finding alternatives that work equally well without the takeover tendencies.
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

October 29, 2010
3:36 AM

Post #8182595

Mine died back too in summer of 09 and I thought it had died, only to have it come back again by late summer. I certainly am going to try and kill it off next year though. It doesn't do any good digging out suckers either because they just come back.
patti47
Lynnwood, WA
(Zone 7a)

October 31, 2010
7:20 PM

Post #8187661

I live in Washington and, interestingly, we all wish for more success with this plant. I have seen plants 20 years old that are still confined to their original spot. Only once have I seen it in flower though. It sure is interesting how our different climates render such different results. I am glad anyway to have learned of it's invasive habits. I have tried a few times to grow this plant but haven't succeeded, now I won't try again.
spartacusaby
Hendersonville, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 1, 2010
2:45 AM

Post #8187929

That's fascinating, pattti, and a bit perplexing since your zone is the same as mine. Good illustration, I guess, of the fact that zones don't tell the whole story!
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

November 1, 2010
5:23 AM

Post #8188040

I can understand that Patti. I took a sucker of this vine and planted it l80 miles north of where I am here in Michigan. It has never done much, same size, no blooms at all for the last 10 years.
patti47
Lynnwood, WA
(Zone 7a)

November 1, 2010
7:34 AM

Post #8188236

I took a real fancy to this plant about 15 years agol when I saw it looking so beautiful in full bloom attached to a verticle support and trained like a tree. There were maybe ten of them like this on the boundary line of a local nursery, Sky, in case anyone reading this is from around here, and I would go there each summer just to admire them. They have since been removed due to extensive remodeling and I was seriously disappointed when I saw that. Yes zones are only part of the story.
Anna_Z
Monroe, WI
(Zone 4b)

November 25, 2010
6:39 AM

Post #8229841

mine has been struggling to grow since I cut it back to the ground 2 years ago. AFter reading all this I think I will finish it off in the spring and "try" to dig it up.
sherman99
Menifee, CA
(Zone 9a)

November 25, 2010
10:45 AM

Post #8230241

I seem to have both the evil one and the other one. the evil one is beautiful on the fence, and the creatures love it. fortunately it is so far away from everything that it can grow and bloom for years and not take over anything. it does grow much faster than the other one, and personally, i think the flowers are prettier. might not feel that way if it was taking over the yard.

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