Wild harvesting for food

Saint Marys, GA

Is anyone interested in finding wild plants which are edible. I don't see anything listed that might consider this topic. I am curious about the tick weed seeds which my pets and I pick up whenever we walk outdoors. My dogs love to eat them. Could they be something suitable for humans? Are they safe for my dogs? I've not seen anything about their toxicity on the internet. Hello! Any botanists out there?

San Marcos, TX(Zone 8b)

I sometimes freak out friends and relatives by eating plants on walks. It takes a lot of research and double/triple checking before you do something for the first time. I have no idea about tick weed. Good luck on your search and be careful.

Elmira, NY(Zone 6a)

A really great new book on gathering wild foods is Nature's Garden by Samuel Thayer. He deals with a bunch of different plants, and it's clear that he has actually eaten them all instead of just listing what other people say about them. I've learned a lot from it.

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

I have his first book, and this one on my 'wish list'... Amazon has some good customer reviews on it
http://www.amazon.com/Natures-Garden-Identifying-Harvesting-Preparing/dp/0976626616/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279033437&sr=1-1

Greensboro, AL

Of course, the man for wild foods is 'wildman' Steve Brill.

http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/

Greensboro, AL

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This message was edited Jul 13, 2010 10:14 AM

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

That may be true, but line drawings are not always enough for ID

Elmira, NY(Zone 6a)

I have Thayer's first book too, darius, and I think the second one is way better. It has a big section just on acorns, the most complete info on preparing acorns I have seen, in fact.

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

I agree... and it's worthy to note the plants are different in each book.

Saint Marys, GA

thanks for all the responses

Fairfield County, CT(Zone 6b)

Just had purslane for lunch. Very high in Omega 3s. Tastes great as a salad with some tomatoes and a little vinegar and oil. Best part is that I am weeding as I am picking supper. LOL

Huntsville, Canada

burdock seeds are usually the seeds that stick to animals fur the dog is trying to remove it if its burdock seeds you can eat them and the dog should be able to eat them too

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

I didn't know you could eat burdock seeds? The recipe I saw was for peeled, tender 2nd year roots... I think.

Huntsville, Canada

The seeds are used medicinally and they are not poisonous. There are other seeds that get stuck on fur or clothing cleavers are one and you can eat them too or use as a coffee subsitute.

Greensboro, AL

I never thought before of collecting lunch from my dog's fur!

San Marcos, TX(Zone 8b)

If you are a dude, you can collect them from your leg hair.

Elmira, NY(Zone 6a)

Man food!

Huntsville, Canada

lol I collect them from the plant just saying you could thoe lol the actual seed should have poped to the ground when it attaches it self the remander velcro like material stays

Greensboro, AL

good one, Jujube!

San Marcos, TX(Zone 8b)

That wasnt a joke. I had to clear a part of the community garden the other day and came home with a hundred hitchhikers.

Huntsville, Canada

make a stew just kidding lol

San Marcos, TX(Zone 8b)

I guarantee you would have to complain to the chef about a hair in your soup.

Huntsville, Canada

lol hitch hickers and furbee soup lol, I just wanted to let people know if a dog ate them it wouldnt hurt them at all

meadville, PA

I found a hairy leaved plant that tastes like horseradish...anyone know what it might be?

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Do you have a photo? I grow horseradish and it isn't hairy. A fuzzy leaf that comes to mind but I've not tasted it as it is not recommend is comfrey. A photo would make a better ID.

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

I have my horseradish and comfrey planted together at one end of a vegetable bed. They do look quite similar... the horseradish leaf is wider, smooth, and doesn't have the slight cast of gray to the leaves.

I've not tasted the comfrey either... I grow it to use as a fertilizer for my tomatoes.

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Gnomelady ~ is this what your dogs dine on? http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55452/ or is it different?

Any seeds would take a quantity to fill me up but if seeds had a flavor they could be used as a spice. I actually believe that although the dogs eat them, the seeds are probably passed through their systems, generating reproduction of these weeds. Same is true of birds and other wildlife that eat seeds.

If you are interested, this is a thread you can access on wild food foraging. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55452/

Huntsville, Canada

Yep and Bears spread our berry seeds around too.
A good fiber to clean out the digestive system.
Comfrey should not be eaten but a little can be used internally to stop internal bleeding but it not to be used internally.
Comfrey is great used externally as a poultice for broken bones healing wounds it is one of the fastest make shure the wound is clean so no dirt gets trapped inside the wound to cause infection later.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/search.php?q=comfrey&Search=Search+PlantFiles

Laie, HI

Anyone remember Euell Gibbons and his guides from the 60's? I still love his books about wild food gathering.

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Yep, Got 'em on my bookshelf!

Fairfield County, CT(Zone 6b)

Me, too.

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Here's an interesting site with lots of good information. (Ignore the videos and CD's unless you just want to spend a few bucks.)
http://www.herbvideos.com/

click on 'wild foods' on the left-hand column...

Huntsville, Canada

Thank you for the web site

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