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Crassula ovata

(Tracey) Mobile, AL(Zone 8b)

I bought this plant at Lowes today. Well not this one exactly, but this looks like it. Looks pretty good but some of the leaves are damaged. The soil is not extremely wet but it is moist. I took it to my office where there are no windows to the outside but there is an abundance of flourescent lighting for a minimum of 10 hours a day. Matter of fact, I set it on my desk directly beneath one of the lights.

Overall it looks healthy, stems are thick as my little finger, firm and look good.

Is there any special care I need to give it other then to let it completely dry out, water from the bottom, and not water very often??? It has lots of leaves.. should I remove the damaged ones?

Thumbnail by daisylovn
Fife, United Kingdom

Hey Tracey, how are you doing? That is a very nice plant you've got there.

I have some crassula ovata plants, including a nice variegated one, and also a few crassula arborescens (like ovata but with dusty, greyish-green leaves). As far as I know, give them as much light as possible, including direct sunshine if possible; allow to dry out slightly before watering well over the growing period, not letting it stand in water; keep cool and just moist enough to stop leaves drying up in winter if light levels are low. That works for me, here in Scotland, but I'm not sure about where you live, particularly with no natural light. However, I see loads of these plants in restaurants, school buildings etc. and they survive pretty well despite all the neglect/incorrect conditions that they suffer so I'm sure yours will thrive under your special care. I think the enemy is overwatering, as it is with most plants. Good luck with it anyhow,

Paul

(Tracey) Mobile, AL(Zone 8b)

Hey Paul,

Good to see you. I am doing well. Just accepted a new job a few weeks ago and I'm loving it. I manage the place. The owner smiled and told everyone in the office he is thrilled I have decided to stay. He commented that you can tell a person has decided to stick around when they start bringing their plants. I already have two on my desk... How are you?

Thanks for the info.. and the compliment. I thought it was a very nice looking plant too. Even though it has some leaf damage I just couldn't pass it up. You know how I am, I will buy some plants that I have to bring home, repot and put them in the "plant ICU" for a while to nurse them back to health, even though the experts say to avoid them..lol.

Maybe we will cross paths one day.. My husband's mother was born a McCleod.. so someday we plan to visit Scotland.

Norridgewock, ME(Zone 5a)

Jade plants are fine house/office plants, you've made a great choice. But I don't understand why you would water from the bottom. I would say water from the top until water comes out the bottom, then remove any excess water from the tray. And yes, it is fine to remove the damaged leaves.

Picture is of my jade in bloom, which occurs in early December. The plant is 35 years old.

Thumbnail by granitegneiss
Fife, United Kingdom

Just be thankful you're not visiting Scotland just now, it's raining everywhere and looks like doing so for the next four or five days at least. Typical summer weather, actually. Also, congrats on the new job.

Paul.

(Tracey) Mobile, AL(Zone 8b)

Thanks Paul. Rains alot in the summer where I live too.

Granite.. I read something that said to water them from the bottom to be sure not to get the leaves wet. That may have been incorrect information.

I forgot to mention that the roots are growing out of the pot at the bottom. Do I need to repot?

Norridgewock, ME(Zone 5a)

Yes, anytime you see roots coming from the bottom hole, you can be sure repotting is in order.

It is quite easy to water from the top without getting leaves wet, and that way you know the whole pot has been watered.

(Tracey) Mobile, AL(Zone 8b)

Potted up just one size and this plant is thriving in my office!! Thanks for all your help.

copenhagen, Denmark

Quote from daisylovn :
I bought this plant at Lowes today. Well not this one exactly, but this looks like it. Looks pretty good but some of the leaves are damaged. The soil is not extremely wet but it is moist. I took it to my office where there are no windows to the outside but there is an abundance of flourescent lighting for a minimum of 10 hours a day. Matter of fact, I set it on my desk directly beneath one of the lights.

Overall it looks healthy, stems are thick as my little finger, firm and look good.

Is there any special care I need to give it other then to let it completely dry out, water from the bottom, and not water very often??? It has lots of leaves.. should I remove the damaged ones?

I think you should remove the damaged leaves. The plant does not need a lot of light, but the new laeves might become smaller than the ones it has now. Bring it home for a few weeks and cut as you please to get a nice look. It can take a lot of pruning without getting damaged. Few weeks in natural light will bring it back in shape.
Try to put one of the damaged leaves on top of small pot with soil. within weeks it sends out new roots and a new plant is on its way.

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