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Article: South African Foxglove, an easy exotic annual (Ceratotheca triloba): GREAT article, Sally!

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Forum: Article: South African Foxglove, an easy exotic annual (Ceratotheca triloba)Replies: 11, Views: 76
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Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 21, 2010
11:46 AM

Post #7986037

I am sitting here at work waiting to go home. decided to google S. African foxglove just to see what I could find--and there was YOUR article--right in Google!

Thanks for all the kudos and the multi-mentions of my name...
My two foxgloves have branched out and are over 6'tall.
AND---one of the two plants' leaves are not "trilobed" at asll. I took pictures--will post...
Blooms are the same...

I kept opening the other links in Google results and there was a good amount of information on this plant under posts from GW as well. Like--another name for this plant is Zimbabwe foxglove.
Must grow in Zimbabwe???

Also a site was listed--- dianeseeds.com/index.html who has these seeds for sale.
A packet of 90 seeds for $3.25. Man! You could have a forrest of S.African foxgloves with that many!
And I like your idea, Sally, of planting these en masse next year--as mych as 'en masse" my tight garden can afford...

Gita

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

July 22, 2010
5:29 AM

Post #7987675

Thanks Gita, although I think your opinion may be a little biased.
I would show a 'group shot' of the two plants I have, except that I can't seem to get one with a decent background. The importance of siting! Yesterday there was a bumblebe stiing in the entrance to one of the flowers. The importance of taking a camera to the garden every time.!

PlantScout has two sources for seeds, and as you found there are more if you just google for them. Thanks for showing a source and BIG thnaks again for the seeds and picture and infomation.
Sally

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2010
8:05 AM

Post #7988004

Sally,
Odd--that no one else is posting any comments to this Article...

I will post here the different leaves I have on the two of mine. Might as well keep all the pertinent information in here--just in case someone wants to see.
Here is the "triloba" leaves on mine

Thumbnail by Gitagal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2010
8:06 AM

Post #7988008

And here is the plant right next to it with the "non-triloba" leaves...
The flowers are the same.

Thumbnail by Gitagal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2010
8:08 AM

Post #7988010

Here are both of the plants--they are over 6' tall.
Should get a lot of seeds from all these this year!
Gita

Thumbnail by Gitagal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2010
8:11 AM

Post #7988013

Here is a decent close-up of the bloom(s)...even if the background (the siding) does not add to anything...

Thumbnail by Gitagal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

July 22, 2010
1:54 PM

Post #7988728

Thanks for the added pictures. I think everybody is on vacation, or watering and weeding, and not reading much of any articles.
How odd that one plant hasn't gotten the tri leaves. Good to know in case somebody is trying to ID one! Your flower closeup does a good job getting the subtle shade of lavender.

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2010
12:00 PM

Post #8002499

Thanks to Gita's generosity, I also got to grow this plant for the first time this year. I probably didn't do a good job with starting the seeds, because I got only one seedling out of the entire pack of seeds from Gita :-(

The plant is healthy and blooming very happily now. I was out of town for more than 2 weeks in the first half of this month and the plant started to bloom during my absence although the temperature was close to 100F. My heart leaped when I saw the beautiful flowers on my return.

I normally deadhead my plants religiously. Not with this one though. I am saving every seedpod this lovely plant may produce and hopefully have some to share with our fellow gardeners.

Thank you very much, Gita, for the seeds. Great article, Sally.

Donner

Thumbnail by donnerville
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2010
4:14 PM

Post #8003021

Donner---Really nice picture!

You are more than welcome! I live to share...and ,most of all, I appreciate feedback from Folks that have gotten my seeds. They are like children to me...I want to know how they are "growing up".

You have a bunch of seed-pods formed already----all those things on the right of the blooms with the 2 pointy things on them...I will have a lot too...my plants are now close to 7' tall...branching all over and blooming away...

Beware!!!! These pods will be woody and hard when dry--and it will be a struggle to get the seeds out...get your pliers out...There are 3 tubes in each of the pods...have to break them apart...then remove the flat seeds...

See the picture Sally posted on her article of the seeds--the cones--and the pods...I took that--and I struggled to get the seeds out...It was my first go too last year.

OR!! I can just post it again here...Gita

Thumbnail by Gitagal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2010
4:59 PM

Post #8003142

Gita, thanks for the tips. I will watch the seed pods closely and make sure I don't lose them.
Shirrush
Ramat Gan
Israel

September 2, 2013
5:28 AM

Post #9648299

I just collected a few seeds of this plant at the Tel Aviv U. Botanical Garden. In typical Sesame family fashion, the pods were wide-open, and all I had to do was to shake them into a bag. I immediately proliferated a small part of my loot to three friendly community gardens, which of course have bumblebees on their minds. I am now looking for the most menacing Pedaliaceae of all, the Devil's Claw, a.k.a. Harpagophytum procumbens, and there's no hurry as we're now planning for Fall plantings and these Summer tropicals can wait.
I'd like to trade some of my seeds, most urgently for North American wild Monarda species. Any idea on whether Monarda didyma exists in the Southeast?

Thumbnail by Shirrush
Click the image for an enlarged view.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

September 2, 2013
8:41 AM

Post #9648474

According to USDA PLANTS, Monarda didyma is native to the US Southeast in its mountainous regions. State maps do not show it in the deep South, and show it in limited areas of Georgia, Kentucky, the Carolina and Virginia. It does appear to be the source of many cultivated Monardas such as 'Jacob Cline',

Thanks for reading and commenting.

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