Photo by Melody

Water Gardens: New Pond

Communities > Forums > Water Gardens
bookmark
Forum: Water GardensReplies: 28, Views: 415
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 9, 2010
3:39 PM

Post #8029661

I just finished and ordered 2 dwarf water lilies and a cork screw rush. I am worried about the amount of sun and heat this little pond will get here in TX. My other ponds were in a cooler climate with part shade and I never had any algae issues. The one good thing is I am hoping to have my lilies bloom more in this setting.
C

Thumbnail by newtonsthirdlaw
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

August 9, 2010
4:31 PM

Post #8029770

Beautiful! I would add some sort of pond bacteria/enzyme...so the water quality stays nice and healthy. The plants will certainly help "eat out" some of the nutrients that cause algae bloom. I stopped using pond plant fertilizer tabs, I had to deal with green water I haven't had in 8 years of ponding. Do you have any fish?
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 9, 2010
4:42 PM

Post #8029798

Not yet and since its small (110 gallons) I will likely just get 5 or 6 feeder gold fish. I am not going to use a filter and hope things will balance out with fish and plants.
C
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 9, 2010
4:44 PM

Post #8029805

Is the enzyme/bacteria to start up the pond?
C
MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

August 9, 2010
7:34 PM

Post #8030223

You can get pond start products, usually labeled as such...but without fish, it's not as neccessary. Barley products will help keep the water clear, it comes as either barley straw or barley liquid. Tadpoles are the best thing for clean clear water, especially if you aren't planning on having anything larger than a few goldfish. They eat algae and dead vegetation.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 15, 2010
4:50 PM

Post #8041921

yes to start the pond, balance the nutrients in it, speeds up the process
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 15, 2010
7:51 PM

Post #8042243

Added 5 small gold fish and two dwarf water lilies. I am looking forward to a bloom or two before winter.
C

Thumbnail by newtonsthirdlaw
Click the image for an enlarged view.

FrillyLily
springfield area, MO
(Zone 5b)

August 18, 2010
5:01 PM

Post #8048226

It is my understanding that the enzyme/bacterias that you buy for ponds are worthless unless they have been refrigerated. Stuff sitting on shelves is no longer active.
It is a waste of money, or so I have been told. I have not ever used it myself. I guess how would you know if it was doing anything or not either way?
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 18, 2010
5:17 PM

Post #8048263

I guess you wouldn't. I think with the fish, plants and insects the pond will have enough "good" bacteria soon enough.
C

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 18, 2010
5:20 PM

Post #8048267

Read the ingredients, sometimes stores are just trying to make more money for themselves and not the companies they carry logos for - gives you more money to spend on their stuff. Times are tuff. If you have the patience, do it the slow way, build it with what you have...
MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

August 19, 2010
6:28 AM

Post #8049197

There are dry enzymes that can survive on the shelf. Once I started using them, I noticed a huge reduction of illnesses for my koi, such a skin ulcers, etc. It eats a lot of the harmful bacteria in the water, if you are planning on having fish.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 19, 2010
7:06 AM

Post #8049252

The dry ones ARE good, and even in a small aquarium indoors, if the water is wrong for the fish they are more prone to sicknesses, skin damage. The premixes give you a jumpstart that has a lot of benefits, more than just learning what they use to create the environment for living organisms, and adding piecemeal on your own-can actually be cheaper in the long run to get the pre mixes and be less worried about the results. You will find one you like and can trust.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 21, 2010
2:28 PM

Post #8054010

I now have a greenish pond but that's ok, it doesn't bother me. Hopefully it won't get thick with stringy goo.
C

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 22, 2010
6:52 AM

Post #8055078

You need to get some water hyacinth into the water, the fish feed in their roots and the water turns miraculously clear. They multiply slowly enuff so that as long as they are floaters you can control them.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 22, 2010
11:26 AM

Post #8055477

Can't find any in TX?
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2010
11:42 AM

Post #8055490

We have tried a number of different bacterias/enzymes over the years. Last year we did not use any of the bacterias/enzymes and had nothing but clarity problems with the water. This year we went back to the Ponzyme Plus and I cannot get over the difference. Ponzyme Plus is a dry bacteria/enzyme and does not activate until it has been added to the water. This year we had very high temperatures and very little rain. The string algae was not as bad this year either. I do attribute this to the Pondzyme.

The higher temperatures of the water will promote more algae growth. The algae can be a problem in depleting the oxygen levels in the pond as well. http://toxics.usgs.gov/definitions/eutrophication.html. It is also important to keep in mind that the higher water temperatures have a lower oxygen level than the colder water. The lower oxygen levels can be disastrous for your fish.

Yes, right now at this point in the economy - nobody has any extra money. I totally agree with that. I will tell you though, that the bacterias/enzymes are or will be on sale very soon. I tend to load up on this type of thing around September. The ponding season is coming to a close and vendors have reduced their costs because they want to move product.

Thumbnail by Carolyn22
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2010
11:45 AM

Post #8055495

You won't find water hyacinths in Texas, Florida, or the like. A lot of these states have this plant banned. It gets into the public waterways and multiplies like crazy. It is also illegal to have these plants shipped to those states. These plants alone will not clear up the water.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 22, 2010
2:43 PM

Post #8055754

Not won't find any in Tx. They are crowding the edges of lakes everywhere down here, water lettuce, water hyacinth, hydrilla (tho my hydrilla has blue flowers and NOT yellow) pickerel weed, lillies, crinum and lycoris -white spider lillies-and the list goes on...
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 22, 2010
3:13 PM

Post #8055787

The water is pretty murky, hoping for fall weather soon. As for shading the pond, what is available in TX that takes the place of water hyacinth, water lettuce etc.? My 2 water lilies are looking poorly, probably was too hot to put them in this time of year. Oh well.
C

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 22, 2010
3:37 PM

Post #8055830

Your water may not have any nutrients, heat soaks out the oxygenation, as far as I know, it takes chemicals to replace what the plants are used for. We already know they are invasives, and illegal, WE are living with them Carolyn. It takes stringent measures to contain and limit their ability to do their job and strictest of disposal measures here, but, then 'In the swamp' as my brother loves to refer to Houston as, that goes for nearly every single plant here. Even the grasses-St Augustine is a nuisance here as well. For all that matter, That is evolution in progress, the weeds grew where no self respecting plant would, then came the grasses, then brush takes its place and hence onward to the trees which block out the plants that came before. IF they do their job well, and we do not halt their natural growth in their own habitat, there will be many plants that adapt, relocate, go dormant, and even die. Many seeds of our ancestors were 'coughed up' by Mt St Helen letting off steam, as witness that nasty Dawn Cedar thingy home builders grew on every corner.
Some will, some won't; Some do, some don't, Some can, some can't, and meanwhile, back at the ranch...
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2010
4:51 PM

Post #8055941

The issue being water clarity - I agree with MerryMary on the enzymes/bacteria and pond health.

This message was edited Aug 22, 2010 7:20 PM
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

August 22, 2010
5:31 PM

Post #8055991

How would enzymes get rid of algae growth? The bacteria they sell might start up a healthy decomposition process but I think in full sun without any plants shading it yet it is going to be green. Green is not really always so bad. As for evolution...well perhaps I won't even go there. Let's just say that when humans introduce a non-native species and it crowds out natives that is not evolutionary process. Still, I would love to have a little piece of water hyacinth...promise not to turn it loose anywhere. It's just a tiny, green pond and will be alright in the end. I do appreciate the advice as I know you guys have had ponds in this climate and so know more about how to maintain them then I do. My little feeder gold fish seem fine and hopefully the water lilies will survive to next year.
BTW, what is frog bit (chin?) and will it cover part of the waters surface?
C
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

August 23, 2010
3:58 AM

Post #8056578

Newton - they do. Something about the nature ecosystem. http://homerenorepair.suite101.com/article.cfm/pond-algae-control-backyard-ponds-and-fountains

New ponds always go through a green period with the algae. It takes for good bacteria to grow and get to a point where it works. Seeding the pond with bacteria and enzymes will help to jump start this process. Barley straw also has the enzymes that will help to keep the algae in check.

Shade does help in keeping the algae at bay, but your waterlilies will need 6 hours or so of sunlight to flower.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 23, 2010
6:40 PM

Post #8058204

Frog bit, Hydrocharis morsus - ranae. Water violet, Hottonia palustris. Hornwort, Ceratophyllum demersum. Greater Bladderwort, Utricularia Vulgaris.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 8, 2011
7:19 AM

Post #8360603

I would love some bladderwort, I love carnvirous plants.
MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

February 9, 2011
6:46 PM

Post #8363511

Once spring rolls around, add as many tadpoles as possible! They really help if you don't want to add a UV light ...
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

March 16, 2011
5:44 PM

Post #8431269

I put in 2 dwarf water lilies, one is making small puny leaves and one has none. I have never had a water lily die on me before or is it just too early for them?
C

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 16, 2011
8:36 PM

Post #8431626

fertilized? give it time, some are slow starters
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2011
5:13 AM

Post #8431945

Some are very slow to start. Some also flower at different times of the year than others. Waterlilies are heavy feeders, so it is a good idea to fertilize them.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Water Gardens Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Lotus/Kitty Litter Mardell 36 Jun 21, 2011 5:29 AM
This is my waterpond before we started the new construction! TraciS 9 Feb 19, 2008 1:35 PM
No Pump Water Garden gardening101usa 4 Mar 12, 2007 5:50 PM
Easy and inexpensive pond... BigDaddy99 85 Aug 8, 2008 11:05 PM
How many ponders are out there ?? List your names - Update! judycooksey 345 Apr 13, 2014 11:22 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America