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Article: Heat-Tolerant Malabar Spinach: I love this plant!

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Forum: Article: Heat-Tolerant Malabar SpinachReplies: 10, Views: 54
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locakelly

locakelly
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9a)

August 20, 2010
8:52 AM

Post #8051664

Nice article!

I have successfully grown Red Malabar for a few years in my Phoenix garden. It survives most of the summer and if the heat gets too much for ut, I cut it back and it springs back from the roots once the temps cool down a bit. I have seedlings popping up in the gardens and even the compost - lol. I have been able to share many seedlings with my friends. Plant it once and you'll always have it. Tastes great and is very pretty to boot!
inaraesgarden
Lakewood, OH

August 20, 2010
9:47 AM

Post #8051749

Where can I get seedlings or seeds of this spinach? Will this grow up here in zone 6? I've tried New Zealand spinach but wasn't particularly fond of it.
Thanks

locakelly

locakelly
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9a)

August 20, 2010
10:42 AM

Post #8051826

Several online vendors sell the seeds (google red malabar spinach). If I remember correctly Johnny's had them for like $2.95 for 100 seeds. I bought my original plant from a vendor at the local farmer's market and have had them coming up ever since. It should grow for you there just fine and is a prolific reseeder.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 20, 2010
6:18 PM

Post #8052636

I grew this from seed un a container but I didn't know how to eat or cook it so i didn't transplant it. What I grew was Burpee 'Oriental flavors' or something.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 20, 2010
6:48 PM

Post #8052711

I grow both the Malabar and Ceylon spinach. I eat them raw in salads or sandwiches or just nibble on the leaves when I out in the yard. I do prefer the taste of the Malabar and love its' purple stems and blooms. When leaves are harvested, it is recommend to use only the young, tender leaves and only remove every other one so the plant will continue to thrive.

I am growing them in large pots, standing in a couple inches of water. They never wilt down and really begin to grow when the heat gets the grimmest. All of August has been 100 plus and these vines are thriving.

Thanks much for bringing attention to these ornamental edible plants!
can2grow
Valparaiso, FL
(Zone 8b)

August 21, 2010
4:49 AM

Post #8053274

It seems that many of us enjoy Malabar spinach. I must admit that I have not eaten very much of it. However, it is an ornamental vine that I enjoy having in my garden. Dave's PlantScout lists some sources for seeds.
russelltdog
Kenner, LA
(Zone 9a)

August 23, 2010
10:04 AM

Post #8057258

I have been growing the green Malabar spinach in my garden for 2-3 years now. I live in the deep, hot south (New Orleans, LA), and the Malabar spinach just grows wild in my backyard. I planted a stem cutting the first year, and it has self seeded ever since. It just pops up scattered throughout my garden and grows very prolifically. I must admit I have not tasted it yet, but I plan to in the next day or two. In my area it loves the sun and the heat and the rain; and pests don't seem to bother it. I like Malabar spinach as an ornamental vine.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 23, 2010
10:27 AM

Post #8057300

Do sample and tell us how you liked it (or not).

We have a friend that cooks his like spinach but we like it raw. I've also heard of it being used in stir frys.

locakelly

locakelly
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9a)

August 23, 2010
10:33 AM

Post #8057316

pod - I use the small leaves raw in salads and they are very good. Older leaves are tougher and excellent for stir frys or cooked just like spinach. Bonus is they don't "wilt" as much as spinach!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 23, 2010
10:37 AM

Post #8057333

Salads and sandwiches here but I do prefer the texture and taste of Malabar spinach. Ceylon is tougher, even the tender new growth so it probably would be good stirfried.
pestee42
Molino, FL
(Zone 8b)

August 23, 2010
8:25 PM

Post #8058473

I've been growing this in NW Florida two or three years now. It's easy and attractive. I love to make quiche with it and also eat it on sandwiches in place of lettuce. I save seeds from year to year but usually have a few volunteers too. It seems to appreciate some shade in the afternoon.

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Other Article: Heat-Tolerant Malabar Spinach Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
my malabar Lindablu99 0 Aug 23, 2010 6:18 AM
This plant is dramatic and beautiful heygeno 0 Aug 23, 2010 6:23 AM
Malabar spinach as food ms_peteshill 0 Aug 23, 2010 4:24 PM
Thanks for this article orangegrovegirl 1 Aug 25, 2010 8:25 PM
Basella rubra dechap66 0 Sep 4, 2010 3:47 PM


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