Photo by Melody

Saving Seeds: Best method for tomatoes?

Communities > Forums > Saving Seeds
bookmark
Forum: Saving SeedsReplies: 13, Views: 174
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
kellydz
Richland, MI
(Zone 5b)

September 16, 2010
3:09 PM

Post #8102800

I just started with seed saving and was wondering what everyone considers the "best" method for tomato seeds. I know everyone will likely have a different opinion just wanted some additional opinions. I know of the "natural" method where you let them sit in the tomato juices in an open jar for a few days until bacteria dissolve the gel and supposed kill off any diseases. Also know of the abrasive method where you let them sit in a abrasive cleaner like Comet for 30 minutes and then rinse thoroughly and wash with a tiny bit of dish soap. Which is preferred? Any pros or cons to each? Any methods I don't know? Thanks!!
Garden_Sass
Central, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 23, 2011
7:05 AM

Post #8325587

The fermentation method is the best; as you point out it helps sanitize seeds of certain harmful bacteria that would be present if the seeds were just allowed to dry on paper towels. This link explains the process very well including tips:
http://gardening.about.com/od/totallytomatoes/ss/TomatoSeeds.htm

Another method is the "hot water bath" which can kill bacteria in the seed's interior:
http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/NewsArticles/All_BactSeed.htm

Anyone saving seeds should be aware of the "best practices" for ensuring those seeds don't pass on a disease to the next generation - remember, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"!

Ms. Tommie



JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

January 23, 2011
11:06 AM

Post #8325992

Kellydz,

Well I don't know if my method is the best, but it works good for me.

I do not fermentate the seeds. I take the seeds from ripe tomatoes, wash them with warm water and put them in very fine sand and put the bowls on a warm place. I stir the seeds in the sand a few times a day and after a 2-5 days the sand is completely dry. I leave them in the sand for another 2-3 days, stirring them once a day.
After that I use a sieve to get rid of the sand. There will be some sand left on the seeds, but that's not a problem.
I learned this method 2 years ago and there is no difference in germination with fermentated seeds. I also get healthy plants.

Jonna
kellydz
Richland, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 24, 2011
8:08 AM

Post #8327458

Thanks for all the feedback. I just used the method with abrasive cleanser this year (which contains some bleach). I think next year I might try a few different methods to see if it affects germination. Sounds like there are many ways that work for different people. Thanks again!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 23, 2011
6:35 PM

Post #8650105

I collect my seeds from the tomatoes as I eat them.

Then I put them in a fine, wire-mesh strainer and wash them with warm water--
rubbing the seeds with my thumb as I go.
When most of the Gel seems to be gone--I put them on a clean paper plate---.
NEVER a paper towel--you will never get them off of it!
When the seeds are dry--I scrape them off the plate and put them in baggies to dry.

I have never used the fermenting method--but my collected seeds germinate and grow just fine.

Gita

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2011
7:00 PM

Post #8650187

I've often wondered if you could reduce the smell of fermenting seeds by changing the water every day -

but would that take away the sanitizing effect of the mold or yeast?

Corey
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

June 24, 2011
9:12 PM

Post #8652957

I like Jonna's method. It is simple. I like simple.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 7, 2011
3:43 PM

Post #8678873

In my opinion, it is not worth saving tomato seeds since they are all hybrid and won't come true from seeds. Tomato seeds are cheap enough to buy.

Just my 2 cents worth.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 7, 2011
6:34 PM

Post #8679244

I think it's open-pollinated and heirloom tomatoes that people cherish seeds from.

And some have pretty names, or strange names:

"Jaune Flammee"
Vorlon
Cherokee Purple
Tommy Toe
"Snow White"
'Black Cherry'

Corey

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2011
8:02 AM

Post #8680093

I definitely grow Cherokee Purple--an awesome tomato!
Have also rown the "Motgage Lifter"...
And--since it is an heirloom--the seeds come true.

The only one that 'confuses me" sometimes if the "Sun Gold" cherry.
I swear I have just it's seeds--and then I grow out a couple--
and sometimes it just turns out to be a red cherry tomato.

Right now--I planted 2 Sun Golds. One next to the other in my new, raised bed.
I can already see that the plants do not look the same--and the size
of the tomatoes that are setting are different. One is bigger (the sun Gold)
and the other ones look like regular cherry tomatoes.

I was really surprised how many Heirloom tomatoes were carried at HD.
Of course--all these and herbs are provided by "Bonnie Plants".
The table with the canopy over it...
They have really good products...

Will see when they ripen...Gita

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 8, 2011
9:37 AM

Post #8680252

The only tomato seeds that will come true from seed is actual heirloom tomatoes IF they are purchased from a seed company that sell them. Heirlooms are those that have not been man made throught hybridization.

Years ago I grew Earliana, and Bonnie Best, both heirlooms, and very early mideum size tomatoes for my zone 4 climate. I don't grow veggies anymore but been trying to find them for my daughter. Have Googeled without success. Early Girl have replaced Earliana but is not the same.

During the 90's local Walmart sold a cherry tomato called SWEET THING. It was the sweetest tomatoe I have ever tasted and great for salads. I saved seeds and grew 6 plants one season.

And what did I get?

All plants grew approximately 3 ft. Four plants had mideum sized Roma (Italian plums) look alike in shape. Two plants had large clusters of cherry type tomatoes. I got 2 different types of plants out of the same saved seeds for SWEET THINGS. However, only the cherry type tomatoes had that very sweet taste and were very productive.

In summary, you will get different types of tomatoes from hybrids, especially if open pollinated. Result depends on the genes. This is how new varieties of iris and dayliles are produced, which I also grow.

There is nothing wrong in saving seeds as long as you aren't set on getting the same tomato from the seeds. You will get surprises, and may even get something better.

Gitagal You proved my point.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2011
2:50 PM

Post #8680747

blomma--

How did I prove your point? I admit--the cherry tomatoes and the different plants are weird.

However--i have shared seeds from my tomatoes with people at work--and the Ch. Prpl.
and the Mortgage Lifter-grows true to all I have given it to.

Isn't that what heirlooms are about? What they are known to be?
Why do you call them Hybrids??? I KNOW that hybrids will not, necessarily, come true from seed.
They are hybridized from different plants--and any of the parentage could come through.

I do not believe that true heirlooms are hybrids of anything...Tthey come true from seed over the years.
This has to be proved at least for 50 years to be called an Heirloom.

I will stand corrected if anyone knows any different.

There is always Carolyn's amazing book on the "100 best heirloom Tomatoes"...You can find it on Amazon.
She is the tomato GURU here on DG. If you go to the Tomato Forum--she is all over the place there...
helping people out with their questions...

Gita

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

July 26, 2011
10:40 PM

Post #8717689

Gitagal wrote:The only one that 'confuses me" sometimes if the "Sun Gold" cherry.
I swear I have just it's seeds--and then I grow out a couple--
and sometimes it just turns out to be a red cherry tomato.

Right now--I planted 2 Sun Golds. One next to the other in my new, raised bed.
I can already see that the plants do not look the same--and the size
of the tomatoes that are setting are different. One is bigger (the sun Gold)
and the other ones look like regular cherry tomatoes.


As I stated, you proved my point. However, I never said that heirloom varieties are hybrids. They are heirloom because man didn't fiddle with them. But, bees love to do so if you grow other varieties at the same time. Those seed become hybrid 1.

kellydz
Richland, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 28, 2011
6:30 AM

Post #8720599

To combat cross pollination from bees you can bag blooms before they open since tomatoes are self-pollinating. I usually just save my seed from tomatoes toward the bottom of the plant so that I am using seed from flowers/fruits that formed before bees were getting very active in my area. I feel OK with this because I just use the seed myself and share with friends and family and am fine is I end up having a cross. Obviously you can't do this is you are saving to sell as a pure heirloom since there is always a chance a bee got to it unless it is bagged.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Saving Seeds Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Beans Crossing ragamuffin 2 Dec 25, 2007 7:28 AM
Angelonia tiG 12 Nov 11, 2007 1:19 PM
'homemade' dessicant? patfrompa 4 Dec 16, 2010 7:09 PM
cant find cats whiskers seed berrygirl 16 Jan 7, 2008 4:34 PM
Mountain laurel seeds txjaks 3 Jul 8, 2008 5:36 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America