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Carnivorous Plants: Help-brown tips on Scarlet Belle

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Forum: Carnivorous PlantsReplies: 14, Views: 64
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jamiew
Montgomery, AL

October 15, 2010
9:21 AM

Post #8157344

This is Sarracenia 'scarlet belle'. There is new growth but the tips are all brown and not red. I'm new to this type of plant and don't know what's wrong. She sits in a tray of rain water from my barrel outside and is constantly moist. She's located about 10 feet from a Southern window in indoor temps of 70-75 degrees. How can I get the tips to turn the pretty red color? Thanks.

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tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

October 15, 2010
3:39 PM

Post #8157971

Normal decay and it should be OUTdoors.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

October 15, 2010
4:28 PM

Post #8158026

It will love your climate, just keep it wet. Mine are out all year and they are doing well.
C

breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

October 15, 2010
5:51 PM

Post #8158124

Sarracenias grow in full sun and thats what brings there red colours out, if in to less light they stay green and will eventually die. Most die down in the cold and re-shoot as it warms up.

This message was edited Oct 15, 2010 8:52 PM

This message was edited Oct 15, 2010 8:52 PM

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jamiew
Montgomery, AL

October 15, 2010
9:26 PM

Post #8158444

Thanks for the information! Can I leave it outside in zone 8b in a container? I don't want to plant it because my yard doesn't stay boggy. That picture of yours is so beautful!
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

October 15, 2010
11:24 PM

Post #8158522

I am zone 8 and I did just that and none died. I wish I had taken a pic but mine were covered in snow last winter. We had an unusually cold winter and they had no problem surviving in small pots. Yours might have problems because it isnt used to being out in the sun. Move it out now before the truelly cold weather moves in.
C
jamiew
Montgomery, AL

October 16, 2010
7:52 AM

Post #8158827

Thank you so much for the help!
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

October 16, 2010
7:59 AM

Post #8158835

The heat will make them slow down some in the summer but as long as they don't dry out they should do well for you. Here are some plants that I have outside in a under the bed plastic storage container to hold water. They over winter in these pots but will need repotting next spring.
C

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jamiew
Montgomery, AL

October 16, 2010
5:53 PM

Post #8159745

Those look incredible too. The sarracenia and a venus fly trap are my first attempts to grow this category of plants. Do you have suggestions for easy to grow varieties?
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

October 16, 2010
7:20 PM

Post #8159882

For me the Sarracenia are easier than VFT's. I have purpurea and I what I think is Daina's delight. There are some real experts on here that can give you advice. I am somewhat new to these plants myself and don't know which varieties are the easiest. Ask me again as I am going to add new species of sarracennia next spring. I love pitcher plants. Check out cobra plants, that company has quality plants and good information.
C

breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

October 16, 2010
11:37 PM

Post #8160138

Sarras are the easiest in full sun and then neps for half shade/greenhouses i think.
Jamiew-not many peoples yards are bogs, alot of cp growers get a plastic container like a kiddys pool or something and make a mini bog with peat and water in it for there cps. Actually i think theres some in the carnivorous forums on this site...?
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

October 17, 2010
2:08 AM

Post #8160172

Nepanthes would be good for indoors, though mine are not what I would call easy to grow. Outside in your heat, I think they would suffer.
C

breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

October 17, 2010
12:04 PM

Post #8160757

sorry newtonsthirdlaw- i ment the easier cooler growing hybrid ones. Yes there is alot of neps that are harder to grow. Yes i supose they'd be harder to keep wet than the sarras you can sit in water. Anyone sit there neps in water?
starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 17, 2010
12:41 PM

Post #8160805

A spindly Sarracenia is a sign that is grown inside. Your plants looks like it came from a Dome of Death at Lowes. Like everyone else, I recommend sticking it outside. They are temperate plants, and need full sun, rain water and the cold of winter. The hardest part of living in Florida is that it is too warm in the winter for these plants. These plants must go dormant or they die from exhaustion. Sarracenia range from Florida to Missisippi to NC. They are not tropical plants. Another type of Sarracenia lives in Michegan and New Foundland.

I would recommend putting all your temperate CPs in one big pot if you growing common ones like Sarracenia, VFT and temperate sundess like Drosera filiformis. They do better in the cooler weather in a bigger pot. You can look at some of my threads for different bog ideas. I need to tell you that I am an obsessed hobbyist, only growing for five years. I am a beginner. I kill a lot of plants, but I also grow a lot of plants.

In my opinion the easiest CPs to grow are Sarracenia "Daina's Delight" (sold as Dana's Delight) followed by S. "Scarlette Belle". I find the hybrids easier than the species. I love my S. catesbei (a natural hybrid). In the south US, I think the intermediates Nepenthes ventrata (sold as alata) and N. "miranda" are the easiest to grow. Give them dappled light outside until it hits 35 degrees. Then bring them inside and keep them near a sunny window through the winter. Both are sold at Wal-mart. For sundews I think D. burmanni (summer annual) is the easiest to grow along with D. capensis (Cape Sundew). Both seed like crazy, and Capes will come back from a little frost from its roots. D. Bumanni will die, but hundreds come up from the seeds. I like to grow sundews from seeds. They grow very quickly.

Sarracenia and VFT will be an inch in a year, if you are lucky. :) I find VFTs tricky. They are difficult to grow in my opinion and a bit more fussy than other CPs.

Glad to have you join us. :)



jamiew
Montgomery, AL

October 18, 2010
6:03 PM

Post #8163193

Wow! Y'all have been a great source for information. I'm going to follow this advice. I should probably wait for spring to really get started and place an order with cobra plants. Thanks again everyone. This will be a new adventure!

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Other Carnivorous Plants Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Vegitarian Plants BogweedBuck 15 Aug 1, 2008 9:14 AM
You all have got to see this! Equilibrium 21 Oct 15, 2008 5:40 PM
Philcula, bog pot or ground bog for new sarracenia hybrid GSkinner 36 Jan 17, 2010 7:35 AM
Let's make a little bog garden! Pixydish 31 Oct 4, 2007 3:17 AM
A couple of my CPs I have yet to kill off Gerris2 9 Apr 28, 2007 7:52 AM


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