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Roses: Can you grow Climbing Roses in containers?

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beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

October 30, 2010
10:34 PM

Post #8186148

I have 4 roses I bought in a co-op earlier this year. They were very small, but healthy! One cultivar (2 rose plants) grew like a weed ... literally! The other two are doing well and blooming like crazy, but they are in smaller containers, so perhaps that is the problem. I specifically got them to grow up and over two arbors in my yard.

Two are "Climbing Old Blush" and they are not very tall. They are also growing in 5 gallon buckets. The other two are "Climbing Cramoisi Superieur" and have already reached the top of my arbor. They are growing in 10 gallon containers with a Clematis vine in each pot as well. Here is a photo of the "Climbing Cramoisi Superieur". It doesn't seem to bloom nearly as much as Cl. Old Blush.

Can I keep these roses in containers? I live in Florida and the knot root nematodes are horrible here. Most of my plants are grown in containers because of that issue. If I continue to grow these climbing rose cultivars in containers, will that help to keep them a bit smaller? My arbors are not that big. And should I pot my Cl. Old Blush into 10 gallon containers like my Cl. Cramoisi Superieur?

Here is a photo of the "Climbing Cramoisi Superieur".

Thumbnail by beckygardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

October 30, 2010
10:37 PM

Post #8186151

And this is a photo of one of my Cl. Old Blush on the east side of the arbor. There is another one on the opposite end of the arbor.

Thumbnail by beckygardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

roseycats
Dayton, OH

November 1, 2010
3:02 PM

Post #8188917

I don't know about your rose's but I really like your Abor.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 1, 2010
7:05 PM

Post #8189397

Thanks, Roseycats! Which arbor? The white wooden arbor or the cattle panel arbor?

I am still hoping someone can advise me about growing climbing roses in containers ... anyone?
Landperson
Santa Rosa, CA
(Zone 9a)

November 1, 2010
7:20 PM

Post #8189448

Both of those roses are climbing Chinas, and both of them really want to be big. Are they grafted or on their own roots? When I worked at an own root rose nursery several years back, the owner always advised against big roses in containers. There are plenty of climbing small roses that would do fine in containers -- climbing miniatures, climbing polyanthas, etc -- but my guess is that the Chinas really need more room to stretch their legs.

Susan

JasperDale
Long Beach, CA
(Zone 10a)

November 1, 2010
7:26 PM

Post #8189464

I agree with Susan. Large climbers will outgrow a container in no time flat as well as using up all the nutrients in the contained soil. Their root systems are just too extensive and need more room to spread out, as well as a constant supply of nutrients which wouldn't exist in a container.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 1, 2010
7:29 PM

Post #8189470

Thanks, Susan, for your information.

I was hoping that by having their roots restricted that they might stay smaller. Though the "Climbing Cramoisi Superieur" got large really fast. The reason I bought those two cultivars of climbers is because they were recommended for Florida. It is very hot and humid here. Many roses I've grown die eventually from black spot and other diseases. I can't grow any in the ground any more because of the nematodes. They are own root and were purchased as very small "liners" and were about 4" - 5" tall. You'd never know I only got them this past Spring. They have grown unbelievably. I do want to pot the Cl. Old Blush into 10 gallon containers. I think the 5 gallon containers are a little too small for them. Miniature roses don't do very well here at all.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 1, 2010
7:33 PM

Post #8189477

JasperDale - Could these roses be root pruned as well as branch pruned annually to keep them in containers? I could also amend the container soil with compost annually along with regular fertilizing. Or will that not be enough? If they are vigorous growers, can they take the abuse and restriction of being grown in containers?
porkpal
Richmond, TX

November 1, 2010
7:43 PM

Post #8189513

Since you already have them in containers, I would be inclined just to keep them contained (in as big a pot as possible) and see how they do. I expect that the limited root space will eventually have a dwarfing effect. They look really happy now.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 1, 2010
8:06 PM

Post #8189556

porkpal - Dwarfing effect? Smaller leaves and blooms? I think I have that happening now. The blooms are small for roses. Maybe they are supposed to be smaller blooms. I don't know as this is the first time I've grown these cultivars. I am okay with any size roses as long as they bloom for me. Dwarf or not. My arbors aren't that big, so I don't want climbers growing out of control on them. They do have thorns, so I want to keep them from snagging anyone walking through the arbors. If they stay dwarfed, that's okay with me and easier to manage.

Since they are pretty aggressive growers, do you think they will survive in pots or eventually die because of the containment? I have Knock-out roses growing in several other pots. I've had them for a number of years now and they are still doing great. So I am hoping the climbers will continue to do well also.
porkpal
Richmond, TX

November 1, 2010
9:22 PM

Post #8189653

I don't know - try the containers and see what happens... There does not seem to be any good alternative.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 1, 2010
11:08 PM

Post #8189726

porkpal - You are right! For me there really isn't another alternative, since I would probably lose them if planted in the ground.

I was just wondering if anyone here on this forum had ever grown these kind of climbing roses in containers and what size container you would suggest if you did. Right now I am very happy with them. I hope they do well in confinement, but this is a first for me, so I really don't know what to expect.
porkpal
Richmond, TX

November 2, 2010
7:54 AM

Post #8190222

I have a couple of climbing roses growing in front of my barn in old 200 gallon water troughs, but they are not really the right roses for the area so they suffer from black spot badly. I don't think the fact that they are contained has hurt them at all.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 2, 2010
10:36 AM

Post #8190454

porkpal - Wow! 200 gallon trough!!! Almost like growing in the ground with that kind of room! :-) I guess this will be an experiment to see how well they do over time in containers. I will probably have to prune them above and below the ground every year to keep them happy and healthy. Which is a chore, but I really want roses on my arbors.

Thanks to everyone for your suggestions and opinions about my dilemma. I really appreciate it! I always seem to be the one pushing the zone and growing conditions with many different plants. I've had more successes than failures, so I am hopeful that this will be another successful experiment!
roseycats
Dayton, OH

November 2, 2010
5:26 PM

Post #8191097

Hey Beckygardener, I really like the arbor with the climbing Cramoisi Superieur growing on it.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 2, 2010
6:12 PM

Post #8191176

roseycats - Thank you! I designed it and my dh & I built it and got it in the ground as a whole piece. We should of filmed that! What a hoot! We made a mini-pergola to match it and got smart and put it together AFTER sinking the posts in concrete in the ground and then added the roof and side trellises. LOL! Experience DOES make a gardener wiser! :-) ;-D
roseycats
Dayton, OH

November 3, 2010
1:55 PM

Post #8192765

Hi Becky, You are really talented. Good luck to you and your roses, I have no luck with them.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 3, 2010
2:29 PM

Post #8192824

roseycats - Thank you! Not talented, just good at copying different parts of garden structures I see in magazines but with a little twist to make them unique to my yard. lol

Here is a photo of the mini-pergola. We combined both wood and cattle panels to make this. I highly recommend cattle panels as it is very strong, durable, and will last for a long, long time. The wood will rot and the vinyl white trellis on the arbor will crack and break long before the galvanized steel will deteriorate. And it is cheap!

Thumbnail by beckygardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 3, 2010
2:41 PM

Post #8192855

Here is what two of the cattle panels arbors look like. I have 3 of them in my backyard. Very easy and cheap to build. They are perfect for climbing roses! The arbor in the forefront is the one I now have the Cl. Old Blush rose bushes training to grow up.

This message was edited Nov 3, 2010 4:42 PM

Thumbnail by beckygardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

roseycats
Dayton, OH

November 4, 2010
6:34 PM

Post #8195075

Becky, I like both they are very nice. I might try to make one next spring.
rosey
moxies_garden
Batesburg, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2011
6:20 AM

Post #8442600

[quote="beckygardener"]I have 4 roses I bought in a co-op earlier this year. They were very small, but healthy! One cultivar (2 rose plants) grew like a weed ... literally! The other two are doing well and blooming like crazy, but they are in smaller containers, so perhaps that is the problem. I specifically got them to grow up and over two arbors in my yard.

Two are "Climbing Old Blush" and they are not very tall. They are also growing in 5 gallon buckets. The other two are "Climbing Cramoisi Superieur" and have already reached the top of my arbor. They are growing in 10 gallon containers with a Clematis vine in each pot as well. Here is a photo of the "Climbing Cramoisi Superieur". It doesn't seem to bloom nearly as much as Cl. Old Blush.

Can I keep these roses in containers? I live in Florida and the knot root nematodes are horrible here. Most of my plants are grown in containers because of that issue. If I continue to grow these climbing rose cultivars in containers, will that help to keep them a bit smaller? My arbors are not that big. And should I pot my Cl. Old Blush into 10 gallon containers like my Cl. Cramoisi Superieur?

Here is a photo of the "Climbing Cramoisi Superieur".[/quote]

Becky..I see in your picture that you have used the concrete patio stone forms. I will be making some also, real soon. Were they easy to work with? And how much were you able to make out of 1 bag of quickrete? I tried to find the blue fibre bags of quickrete, but wasn't able to locate them. So, I have ended up with 4 bags of some other blue bag fibre concrete. Anyway, I just wondered how making them worked for you.
That is a lovely patio, by the way. The trellis, the patio, the plantings.

terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2011
6:55 AM

Post #8442679

moxies_garden, thank you for bumping this thread! And beckygardener, thank you too for the photo of your cattle panel arbor. That is exactly what I am trying to build in my veg garden and I can't seem to get DH to understand what I am doing so I can get him to help. He thought I was nuts, now he has a photo and says "Ahhhhh, now I see what you want". Left handed engineers are the most dificult...=D
moxies_garden
Batesburg, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2011
7:51 AM

Post #8442778

[quote="terri_emory"]moxies_garden, thank you for bumping this thread! And beckygardener, thank you too for the photo of your cattle panel arbor. That is exactly what I am trying to build in my veg garden and I can't seem to get DH to understand what I am doing so I can get him to help. He thought I was nuts, now he has a photo and says "Ahhhhh, now I see what you want". Left handed engineers are the most dificult...=D[/quote]


Omg...a left handed Engineer!! I live with a machinist...OCD/adhd...and a Virgo to boot. :D But, I love him anyway.
He was a sweetheart and built me a potting bench this past weekend. I could not make him understand that I wanted the top surface to remain rough. He made it out of crates shipped from France, and of course, they have all of the French and shipping text printed on them. I wanted to keep the provenance, the texture, it's history.
Well, I came back into the woodshop...as he was planing them smoothe on his planer. Poor man. Must be tought to live with OCD/Virgo tnedencies. Lol

I am posting a pic on the potting bench in the next thread. Gotta love him. :D

moxies_garden
Batesburg, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2011
7:55 AM

Post #8442786

Here is my new potting bench..the inside one. The property already had a nice hot house built, with the shelves. But, I needed something to do my potting with, etc. And, as not much room in the hothouse, I needed it smaller. I love it, and it will work perfectly for that abbreviated space. Next, to do the front of the hothouse with the concrete patio stones I mentioned earlier. Right now, when it rains, I walk thought mud and puddles. I will be just making one row of the stones, on the front, and the South side. The south side we will install a sink for washing the garden veggies. I tried to wash turnips in the kitchen this winter. Spiders...mud...bugs...leaves everywhere...lol

Thumbnail by moxies_garden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2011
8:50 AM

Post #8442877

That is very nice! And at least you have a story and some piece with the French markings on it.

Yes, I do love the left handed engineer. Despite the long and involved explainations I have under the hot sun in the garden LOL! It often transpires that he gets too hot and goes inside and leaves me to it. When I'm done he comes out and says "ohhhhh, that's what you were doing. why didn't you just say so!". I did, in many ways. Sighhhh!

Oh well, now he knows what I want so he's figuring how much of the materials I've laid out from out "scrap pile" will work for this project. He's only just now learning that gardening can be fun! City boy =D!
moxies_garden
Batesburg, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2011
8:54 AM

Post #8442885

I am the "city kid" in this relationship. Well, my ex husband was from the country too, as well as the 2 b/f's I had. I am used to living with country boys.

I hear you about the explanation thingy. Sometimes, he and I find out we are saying the exact same things...just in different ways.

It was too cute when I caught him planing my surface boards. He got all sheepish and embarrassed. I just gave him a big kiss...and told him I love him anyways =))

Thumbnail by moxies_garden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2011
9:35 AM

Post #8442949

=D!
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 22, 2011
7:42 PM

Post #8444077

moxies_garden - Thanks! The concrete paver mold was easy to use, but a lot of hard work. Be sure to spray it lightly with PAM between each concrete paver you make. Those bags of concrete were a bear to lift and mix. My dh and I did a few rows each weekend until we got it all done. Took about 5 weeks for a small patio area. That was several years ago. I don't know if we could do it now. My back isn't what it used to be! LOL! The trick is to make sure you wet the ground before setting the mold form and pouring concrete. Otherwise, the concrete dries too fast and will crack or break. The longer it takes for the concrete to set up, the stronger it is. Be sure to slope it away from your home too! You don't want flooding!

I can't remember now how many pavers we got per 60 lb. bag of concrete mix. I think it was 2. I don't know. My dh did the mixing and pouring. I just patted & shook the mold with concrete to settle the concrete, and smoothed it over especially around the edges. I stayed in a crouched position the whole time. Ugh! LOL! But I love it! We did the arbors, too. And the picket fence around the patio. And a few other structures. The plants going in and the raised garden beds and paths will be last. I add a little every year. Not sure how many years it will take me to finish, but then I want to do the front yard and the sides of the house! LOL! I think it will take me the rest of my life to complete! I hope I live long enough to enjoy it all when it's done! Ha, ha!

BTW - Love your "French" potting bench! That's what I want my dh to make me some day! He already knows it, too! LOL!

terri - My dh couldn't figure out what I was talking about with those cattle panels either! I showed him a photo from someone else here on DG, but he still wasn't getting how to do it. But I knew, bought all the materials, and explained it as we built it together! We made the first one and it turned out great, so we made 3 more! LOL! I love them! I also used the cattle panel on my mini-pergola. Galvanized steel will last for years and years! :-)

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