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Poppies: question ????

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gretagreenthumb
Wichita Falls, TX

November 2, 2010
8:09 PM

Post #8191378

Do poppies do well in clay soil?

I just made a new butterfly/hummingbird bed (11 x 20). Thus far not much is in it. Baby plants do not take up much space. I'm wondering, if I scatter some poppy seed this winter (TX zone7), and they made it. Would they fizzle back with the heat of spring/summer and my bed be ready for the other plants to enlarge?

Years ago, my parents had a place they planted a pink pom-pom type poppy. Every year is was beautiful when they bloomed. Then, for whatever reason it stopped -- my dad probably sprayed it. That was years ago -- many years -- say 25-30. This past year, they had one of those poppies come up in their garden that was on the other side of the house, say 200 yards away or so. Must have something to do with that poppy God I read about on this site.

I would love to do something like this in the bed I mentioned earlier, but am afraid the two won't mix. Thus far I do not have any mulch on the bed. Am considering planting a cover crop to keep the soil covered and nurished.

Any ideas? Thanks!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2010
5:07 AM

Post #8195450

I cant really answer for Texas gardens but here the annual poppies are sown in december and sprout in late March or early April.
The plants dont mature and bloom until June-July and seed in August.
If you sow a cover crop or mulch over or under your poppies wont germinate.
I weed the area where I sow seeds. I also scratch the clay soil ,then sow seeds and step on them to seat them into but not covered them.
Seeds need light to germinate and a period of cold weather. Thats the situation here in Z6a.

HazelCrestMikeB

HazelCrestMikeB
Hazel Crest, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 10, 2010
9:05 AM

Post #8204692

Greta G/T, I would suggest the Super poppy series from Burpee/Heronswood Nursery. This is a new breed that I planted this year that doesn't die back like the other poppies once established. I am looking forward to blooms from Jacinth and shasta. These also reblooms. You just have to cut the stalk back as soon as the bloom is done in the spring. Poppies like the soil a little on the rich side to do its BEST.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2010
9:21 AM

Post #8204733

Just checked out Herronswood.
I doubt I will order from them altho the poppies you mentioned are sweet.
This nursery has 18 comments in the negative, my cut off is 8 negs. All comments had to do with size of plant for the price and customer service was horrible.
I have a policy not to deal with companies like this. I will wait to see if these Superpoppies are offered thru another vendor in 2011.
I hope you have luck, I realize not everyone had bad experiences.

This message was edited Nov 10, 2010 12:24 PM
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 10, 2010
2:40 PM

Post #8205222

I sow poppy seeds in my area anywhere between Oct-Jan. I just surface sow them. In our area it isn't the cold that gets them but the heat. Last year was a fantasic year because of all the rain and cold weather. I have the best luck with Corn Poppies and CA poppies last year the Icelandic poppies were beauiful also.
gretagreenthumb
Wichita Falls, TX

November 10, 2010
5:17 PM

Post #8205527

1lisac -- how long do the poppies last? Are they needing to be pulled up by June??? I'm okay with that, thinking that is about the time others are ready to battle the heat.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2010
1:45 AM

Post #8205941

I sow annual somnifariums between December and early March.
If you want more poppies in the same area just leave the plants until they dry up and cast their seeds otherwise pull them if you dont want poppies next year.
Each plant prodices many blooms.The blooms last about 2 days ,then petals drop and seed head is formed. These are somewhat attractive.
Seed heads can be harvested and seeds saved in a paper bag ,for sowing in the late fall.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2010
5:14 AM

Post #8206047

Probably the seeds from just one poppy would be enough for many people! I couldn't believe our harvest from the seeds, then plants, that came from Jo Ann (ge1836).

The seeds in this photo are about an inch in depth.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2010
6:42 AM

Post #8206211

Good-lord Pirl.
I want your camera. Thats a fantastic picture.
They would be an inch deep if those are the tops of the pods.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2010
7:27 AM

Post #8206276

I removed the top of each poppy seed pod but there are millions of seeds. How I'd love to put a handful in different areas within Southold but the town workers would probably pull them out.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2010
8:16 AM

Post #8206350

OMG that reminds me of a true story.
There was a big highway project here many years ago. It was finished in September.
I had a friend who saved poppy seeds. I mean a gallon bag of mixed somniferiums,it must have weighed 3 pounds.
We went for a drive one night and tossed seeds as far as we could all thru the cloverleaf interchange.
We waited until spring and to our dismay there was only 3 or 4 wayyyyy back near a sound barrier wall.
We found out later, the good people who volunteer from their business's had a weeding weekend.
They pulled poppies as much as they could .All in the name of "Highway Beautification"
It really IS in the eye of the beholder.
I doubt there was a gardener in the lot.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 11, 2010
8:24 AM

Post #8206363

Jo Ann-that's sad. All that beauty gone to waste.

Greta-I grow mainly Corn Poppies (Papaver rhoeas) I just toss the seeds, or they reseed themselves. They grow different every year, I think it depends on how much rain we get and how cold the winter is. It seems like the colder the better. I never pull them they come up earlier then most of the Wildflowers so by the time they get done blooming they get over taken by other flowers.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2010
1:50 AM

Post #8221322

I sowed the almost last of my poppies yesterday.
The very lasy seeds go as soon as the bedroom window is repaired. I dont want the crew to tromp on the area.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 24, 2010
2:23 AM

Post #8228198

Just rvisited this thread and am answering the soil question from the top.
I read a seed business directions about annual poppy seeds. If you have clay soil,they suggest amending with compost before you cast seeds for next years crop.We have amended clay soil here and poppies do fine.

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

November 24, 2010
7:01 AM

Post #8228441

I had success sowing somniferums some 40 years ago on clay soil. All of the annual poppies die in the heat of summer here. The poppy that came up at your dad's house most likely came up because of what is called the soil seed bank. Not all seeds from a plant come up the first time sown. Instead some will lie dormant for years and then come up. This is a species survival mechanism.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 24, 2010
9:00 AM

Post #8228609

I knew,moss rose did that.
I didnt know annual poppies could germinate long doement seeds.
I had heard even seeds that have been turned over in soil ,will germinate as soon as conditions are just right.
I was told the seeds eventually work their way to the surface .
This is Moss Rose I mean.
If somnifariums do this I am in for a treat when the pounds of no-shows last year, decide to grace me.
Our Somnifariums die in the heat here too but left where they are they will re seed where they grow or collect seeds and sow where you want them in very late fall(Nov) thru Early March.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

November 24, 2010
12:25 PM

Post #8228859

It's been a couple of years since I have allowed somniferums to grow in my garden though they still germinate. Here they get huge then die and in the process often get a wet slick rot in our humidity. Still I have ordered a mix from swallowtail gardenseeds. As the saying goes insanity is doing the same over and expecting different results.
Attached is a shirley poppy volunteer from last May. Though I said I was banning them from my garden I let a couple of them bloom

Thumbnail by timeinabottle
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 25, 2010
3:19 AM

Post #8229703

cant wait for May
summerflower
Salem, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 13, 2011
9:50 AM

Post #8308544

Hi, I have a hill (burm)in my yard that is almost all clay and the orientals that I have grow and come back every year!! If you would like some seeds please let me know!!!!
Lisa

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2011
9:59 AM

Post #8308560

Yes Orientals are perennial.
summerflower
Salem, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 13, 2011
10:58 AM

Post #8308671

I wondered, but was not sure if it came back or if it was new seed that droped from the plant!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2011
11:05 AM

Post #8308686

The orientals have bright green deeply serrated and hairy leaves.
summerflower
Salem, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 13, 2011
11:41 AM

Post #8308736

I have the lettuce type also

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2011
11:53 AM

Post #8308752

Yes. Those are annuals and reseed themselves.I love them.
Sometimes known as somnifariums. There are other annual varieties but I cant remember all of them.Plus I am not a botonist but do what I can.
summerflower
Salem, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 13, 2011
11:54 AM

Post #8308761

Yea, there is no way I can keep track of all of them, but let me know if you need some seed!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2011
11:57 AM

Post #8308768

You are sweet to offer. I will access what I need.
I also think a thread for annual poppies would be a good idea as there are several threads where we talk at cross purposes.
gretagreenthumb
Wichita Falls, TX

January 13, 2011
4:37 PM

Post #8309232

Summerflower -- are the seeds you are offering from perennials? Or annuals? I'd love some annual seed. I really don't think our hot hot hot summers will allow the perennials to live here.

Thanks if that was an open invitation to the seed. If not, consider me greedy. : ) (It is okay to tell me NO).
summerflower
Salem, OR
(Zone 8a)

January 13, 2011
4:46 PM

Post #8309248

Oh of course you are welcome to them!! They are the annual kind!! Dmail me and I will give you my address

Admin note: This user account is an alias for a past member, lljjz, whose account was terminated in July 2010 for failure to complete trades in a timely manner. This account has been terminated as well. If you find this member reappearing under any other alias, please notify us immediately.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2011
2:39 AM

Post #8309768

OK.
BUSTED

This message was edited Jan 14, 2011 7:35 AM

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Other Poppies Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Poppy reference sources (and pictures too) balvenie 29 Oct 7, 2009 11:38 PM
Oriental poppies - seed or root stock? ghia_girl 15 Jun 22, 2010 12:12 AM
Starting to grow mrpoppy 3 Mar 6, 2007 12:46 AM
Meconopsis from seed picante 42 Oct 12, 2008 7:15 PM
7b-ers who are going to sow soon sublimaze1 7 Mar 9, 2007 7:36 PM


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