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Texas Gardening: Gardening with Texas Native Plants; The Wildflower Slope.

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
6:40 PM

Post #8211859

The " Wildflower Slope" was our first project in our attempt to work with Texas Native Plants. It began in 1997 after we read an article that was published in the Arlington newspaper. It featured a yard that was a certified urban Wildscape, made up of native plants and showed how it worked to attract wildlife and give them a home.

I was very excited about the idea and called the lady to ask if I could come see it and talk to her about it. She was very gracious and explained how she had done it. I was very impressed with her place and decided that it would be great for us to try it too.

Unfortunately at the time I was totally ignorant about the concept of native plants, although I loved nature, wildflowers and animals and had been gardening organically since 1969. So, I gathered as much information as I could from books, the internet and friends, but alas native plants were very hard to find.

We had this area we call the slope because of the steep incline. It measures 10 by 80 feet and it faces south to the side street of our corner lot. It was covered with bermuda and framed by bare chain link fence, presentable but not pretty. So we chose it as the starting point in our endeavor to create a certified urban Wildscape.

I bought some wildflower seeds and scattered them on the close cut grass in the fall. Well our first spring was not spectacular but I kept checking the nurseries and searching through empty lots for wild plants and little by little we built a nice collection of plants. Some of them just volunteered on the slope when we stopped mowing and let the plants come up. Frostweed, Ironweed, Goldenrod and Primrose are some volunteers that come to mind.

Collecting and growing native plants has become a passion for us since we love the idea of plant conservation and showing that a native plant garden can just as beautiful as any filled with exotics. The Slope has served as great educational tool for the neighborhood as people stop by to ask,"What are those beautiful flowers?" and to say, "Thank you we enjoy them every time we drive by".

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
6:42 PM

Post #8211864

This is how it looks in winter with all the plants cut down.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
6:43 PM

Post #8211866

Early spring with Crossvine in full bloom and plants waking up.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
6:45 PM

Post #8211867

Mid spring with the gorgeous Coneflowers in bloom.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
6:47 PM

Post #8211879

Early summer with the Western Ironweed in bloom, I love the bright purple color.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
6:49 PM

Post #8211884

Late summer with Frostweed and Obedient Plant such a lovely combination.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
6:52 PM

Post #8211892

But fall is the most spectacular with Purple Aster, Heath Aster and Autumn Sage.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
6:54 PM

Post #8211897

There are many other plants on the slope, mainly perennials, it changes constantly with the plants coming into bloom at different times.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2010
9:50 PM

Post #8212189

I always enjoy the slope each time I visit you. I love to see it change and to search it for the many butterflies that enjoy it's bounty... Like this Southern Dogface on the Turks Cap.

I look forward to the new changes you have planned also.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
4:51 AM

Post #8212349

Thank you Sheila it is an adventure and a labor of love, we are hoping that it will inspire other people to use Texas native plants in their gardens.
Your garden has also changed a lot, it looks really lovely and I think you have made wonderful changes, especially with hosting and raising butterflies.
realbirdlady
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 15, 2010
5:15 AM

Post #8212374

So yall didn't ever pull the bermuda out? Just kept sowing more stuff on top of it?
Dogs_N_Petunias
Cleburne, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
5:27 AM

Post #8212384

Josephine,
You and your garden are great inspiration for me to keep plugging away on my project.

I am glad there is a program like the Wildscape program. When we moved to our place in spring of 1981, the approx. 40 acres beside us was just a wonderland of wildflowers. Could not count them all. I just enjoyed them and never even took photos, just thinking they would be there forever, I guess. Well... the land changed owners and the first thing the new owner did was spray the whole 40 acres with herbicide on a very windy day using a large tractor spray rig, a lot of which blew over to our property before we could stop him. Our baby goats stopped nursing evidently because their mother's milk was tainted with the spray and they could taste it. Big crisis to deal with but that's another story. Anyway, no more wildflowers because after that they sprigged with bermuda grass and worked hard to kill all the wildflowers. And I know this is happening everywhere, so it is great there's a program to preserve them in urban areas.

Question: I want to transplant some of the Western Ironweed that's in "the wild" across the road from us. Is it best to do it right after killling frost or wait until early spring and new growth starting?

Glenna

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
5:56 AM

Post #8212427

That is right Birdlady, We kept sowing and making holes and adding plants until the grass got shaded out by the plants, it took a while to accomplish that but it has all been gone for a long time now.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
5:58 AM

Post #8212435

Glenna, I want to take a little more time to respond to your post, but I have to leave to work on the butterfly garden, I will get to your post later.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
6:18 AM

Post #8212461

Glenna...I tried digging a couple plants of ironweed to share at RU last time and found it to be very deep rooted and difficult.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
10:34 AM

Post #8212947

Glenna, I can't believe your neighbor destroyed all those beautiful flowers to put in bermuda.
What was he thinking ? This is one of the reasons why we have to protect native plants and let people know how important and beautiful they are and how much we need them.

Western Ironweed is indeed very had to transplant once it is established, the roots are very hard wood, they don't call it Ironweed for nothing. Still if you can manage it, you can dig some up now or in the spring and it should work fine.
It makes a lot of seed but I haven't had much luck with it either, but I have had great luck with tip cuttings in the spring they usually all root, so that is how I propagate it. If you need it I can give you some potted at the spring swap.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
10:41 AM

Post #8212966

For those of you who might be interested in building an Urban Wildscape, this is how we did it.


Texas Parks and Wildlife
Urban Program Certification
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/wildscapes/certification/index.phtml

You will find that the cost of your packet is very small just $15.00.


How we were introduced to native plants and became certified.
We found out about the program through an article that was featured in our local newspaper. They featured a yard in our city that was a certified, and Linda the featured gardener said that she would welcome inquiries, so I called her and asked permission to come and see her yard.

I had no idea that you could get your yard certified by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Urban Program, I imagine not many people know about it either, it seems to be a well kept secret.

I loved her yard, and all the good she was doing for the environment, so naturally I was very excited by the possibilities, and immediately sent for the certification packet and started planning my yard according to the requirements.

It took us 2 years to get to the point where we felt we qualified, then we sent in the application.
In about 6 weeks we got our certificate and outdoor plaque. Talk about excitement! I was jumping up and down, I was so happy.

Because we love this idea so much, we want to tell and help as many people as possible, so that they may experience the joy of watching beautiful birds and butterflies, and the beauty of our wonderful native plants and wildflowers.

Many people stop by our yard to admire this or that flower, which they had never seen, although they are natives to this region. We have raised the awareness in our neighborhood, and you can do the same in yours.

Go to http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/wildscapes/certification/index.phtml to get started on your own adventure.

Let us restore our landscapes to their native splendor.

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 15, 2010
11:02 AM

Post #8212997

One of my favorite memories growing up in Houston was picking the beautiful wildflowers to give to my mom! The empty lots by our house were full of different types and colors. Seeing the wildflowers on the side of the roads fills me with happiness! It's one of my favorite parts of living back here in Houston.
As for that person (dope) who sprayed those fields, I would have cried... If they weren't going to build something right away, why in the world put bermuda grass?? Probably thought he was replacing weeds with something better...
Thanks for sharing pictures of your wildscape. It's beauty makes all the work worth it.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
1:19 PM

Post #8213204

You are welcome Bariolio, and you are right it is a lot of work, but such wonderful work, I don't mind at all, I just love it.
Josephine.
Dogs_N_Petunias
Cleburne, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
1:25 PM

Post #8213227

Quoting: If they weren't going to build something right away, why in the world put bermuda grass??


I think the purpose was so they could put a few cows over there and claim the ag exemption on property tax. But anyone with any sense wouldn't be spraying a deadly chemical with the wind blowing, if for no other reason than to protect their own health.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
1:39 PM

Post #8213274

Well it seems to me that cows would probably prefer to eat natural vegetation, but in any event chemicals really scare me.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
7:23 PM

Post #8213911

You are such an inspiration, Josephine! I always love to see pics of the slope and well, all your plants. I'm slowly working on adding more natives to the big full sun bed, thanks to folks like you and Sheil and the others who share from their bounty.

We've had our flower bed for 4 or 5 years now. I noticed that the people who live across the street and a few houses down started a small garden with some natives earlier this spring. I've been tempted to stop and ask for cuttings or seeds of some of their plants! LOL It's not much, but they expanded it this fall and added more plants.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
7:38 PM

Post #8213978

Thank you Stephanie, it is true that when you catch the native plant bug it is very infectious and a lot of people will catch it from you too. That makes me very happy.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
4:55 AM

Post #8214293

One reason I like growing them is because they are so easy and, for the most part, they out compete everything else. I usually use seeds, but I only have to do it once and they keep coming back.
Lisa

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
5:01 AM

Post #8214302

Hello Lisa, yes some are very easy and some not so easy, but they are very much worth the effort.
I am glad you are using them too.
Josephine.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
5:16 AM

Post #8214325

I guess I only grow the easy ones. LOL Once they are established they require so little care.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
5:26 AM

Post #8214346

As we get older the "little care" looks better and better. I am considering expanding beds in the back yard for a larger butterfly morning to noon sun bed. we have cut down several small trees that were blocking the sun, and the plants already look better.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
5:44 AM

Post #8214381

That is great Sheila, your yard is looking so pretty, I have to come and see it in the spring.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
5:52 AM

Post #8214398

Thanks. I would love to have you and a few others that live in the area over and have lunch one day. It would be fun. Maybe you can show me where the native planting area you told me about, located south on Grandbury Rd.
AJNTEXAS
Beaumont, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 16, 2010
6:01 AM

Post #8214417

frostweed wrote:Thank you Stephanie, it is true that when you catch the native plant bug it is very infectious and a lot of people will catch it from you too. That makes me very happy.


I caught the "Bug" from you when a joined DG a couple of years ago. Haven't had much luck incorporating them in my yard yet, but I go out searching, photographing, and learning as much as I can.

newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 16, 2010
6:35 AM

Post #8214477

Josephine,
I had read some time ago about the Urban Wildscape designation. Aren't there 2, one being easier than the other. I seem to recall one allowed some non-natives. I try to incorporate more and more natives but still buy and use plants that are non-natives but like our climate.
My favorite natives thus far:
zexmenia, different sages, black foot daisy, brazos penstemon, moss verbena, four nerve daisy, cone flowers, natiive hibiscus, cowpen daisy, turks cap, flame acanthus, yellow bells and my new and definate favorite for this year is the skeleton leaf golden eye, it has grown and bloomed all season.
C
realbirdlady
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 16, 2010
9:46 AM

Post #8214858

National Wildlife Federation has a designation that is not as demanding, http://www.nwf.org/Get-Outside/Outdoor-Activities/Garden-for-Wildlife/Create-a-Habitat.aspx

That could be a good one if you're trying to pull in the neighbors. You can just about just give them cuttings, throw some seeds over the fence when they aren't looking, and maybe host a holiday bird and bee house building football watching cocktail party, and you're all done. Everyone will see more impact in wildlife, since there's a bigger connected area of habitat.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 16, 2010
9:53 AM

Post #8214880

I want to try more but also want some long. Bloomers that are more refined. I bought some agastache to fill that need.
AJNTEXAS
Beaumont, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 16, 2010
11:16 AM

Post #8215019

Texas Wildscapes only requires 50% native plants

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
11:37 AM

Post #8215058

AJ, I am so glad you caught the bug too!! You are right Texas Wildscapes requires only 50% native although more is better, plus water shelter and food for the wildlife. It is not hard to do and it is so much fun.
I know a lot of you have native plants and if you try a little more you could qualify for the Urban Program. Wouldn't be fun?
I want to have people over here too next year, it is too late now since plants are going to sleep, but I will do it for sure.
Josephine.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
1:56 PM

Post #8215291

Josephine...we can break your newly renovated front yard in with a picnic in the spring!
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
2:00 PM

Post #8215296

Does it count if I have 18+ acres of Native Grassland. I'm too far out to be considered Urban but its still Native.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
2:52 PM

Post #8215365

Yes Sheila, that would be great, looking forward to it.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lisa, go to their site on the link I provided and I am sure they have an option for your situation.
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/wildscapes/certification/index.phtml

This message was edited Nov 17, 2010 11:38 PM
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 16, 2010
3:27 PM

Post #8215425

I think I have 50% natives and probably more. Will have to read up on the requirements.
C
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
3:49 PM

Post #8215455

I have seen your slope and it is wonderful. I forgot that the bermuda was just crowded out over the years. I will take an inventory b/c I think I can make the 50%.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 16, 2010
3:58 PM

Post #8215468

We need to have a native plant/seed exchange so we can all apply.
C
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
5:51 PM

Post #8215783

Thanks Josephine-My Ag exemption is for Native Grassland I'll have to check that sight out more.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
6:03 PM

Post #8215806

Yes!!! that is a wonderful idea let us do it! I will be glad to help in any way I can. Remember that it is 50% of the plant species not 50% of the number of plants.
I am so excited!!! I can't wait.
Josephine.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 16, 2010
6:07 PM

Post #8215818

So when would the best time be, spring? Personally I would really enjoy trying new natives if I could actually find them and didn't have to pay a lot for them. Now I have to think about saving more seeds and maybe sowing a few to have plants to share, this could be fun.
C

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
6:17 PM

Post #8215838

If you want to plant seeds most of them work better for winter sowing since they require cold to germinate, I will check my seeds and see what I have to offer, but not tomorrow I have a lot lined up, I will do it soon as I can though, this is going to be great!
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 16, 2010
6:38 PM

Post #8215882

I have some to start, will take stock. Who else might be interested in trading/propagating some TX natives and finding out about the wildscape certification?
C

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
6:45 PM

Post #8215898

I got some seeds from Sheila at the spring RU for Western Ironweed. I'd be happy to share with you.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
6:46 PM

Post #8215903

OH Good Lord save me from myself. I would like to participate.
I actually have seeds from the Wildseedfarms that are Tx/Oklahoma Blend. I would be glad to share some with those already on this thread. (Not an open offer) If your interested Dmail me. They need to be sown pretty soon, at least by the middle of Jan.
You can go to the wildseed farms website to see what is in the seed mix
Lisa
realbirdlady
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 16, 2010
6:47 PM

Post #8215906

I would be in general, but I just dumped everything I had left of flowers and grasses into seedballs for the neighborhood. Plenty of wafer ash, if any one in the native range wants some...


1lisac, if you have a chance, go on a field trip with Lisa and Jason Spangler, from the native prairie association http://www.texasprairie.org/ . They know everything, but yet are still good explainers for regular people. Prairies aren't maybe as flashy as some habitats, but they're just as native.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
7:07 PM

Post #8215941

I think Prairies are wonderful they are my favorite.
I could use some Wafer Ash
http://wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PTTR
It is the larval host for the Tiger and Giant swallowtail butterflies and they are so wonderful.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 16, 2010
7:18 PM

Post #8215973

I am not sure I have enough of any seed to share but would like to try and have a get together in the spring and bring some seedlings, cuttings etc. of natives to swap. I am going to start the following and if they do well will have a few in spring to share:

Salvia penstemoniodes
Drummonds phlox
Rudbeckia hirta
Verbena bipinnatifida
TX star hibiscus
Brazos penstemon
native white hibiscus (cannot recall name at moment)
Desert willow tree

Some of these I have only a few seeds, others I might have enough to share with one or two people if they want to try and grow some.

C

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
7:35 PM

Post #8216012

Cheryl are you already starting your trade list?!? LOL LOL
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 16, 2010
7:40 PM

Post #8216025

I want to get jump start on spring LOL

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
8:28 PM

Post #8216108

That is a very impressive list Cheryl, I hope they all do well for you, if that Verbena does well save some for me please.
Dogs_N_Petunias
Cleburne, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
4:51 AM

Post #8216342

Quoting: Who else might be interested in trading/propagating some TX natives and finding out about the wildscape certification? C.


I definitely want to participate. We have a very large area we would like to turn into a wildscape.

re: Western Ironweed
Josephine, if you will tutor me a little on rooting the tip cuttings, I want to try that in the spring. Attached photo if of the patch of Western Ironweed I've been watching in the wild for the last year. It puts on a magnificent "show" every summer but is on a corner where it blocks the view of drivers and so is likely to be mowed. I just love it. Had no luck with seed.

Glenna

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
5:00 AM

Post #8216355

Oh my Goodness, this is so heart warming! The Ironweed puts a great show indeed.
Yes, I will be glad to show you how to root the cuttings, it is not hard at all, and as I said most of them root, we will get to it in the spring.
In the meantime gather as many seeds as you can of different plants and sow then in your chosen area after you mow very close if there is grass, then rake and scatter your seed. That will be a start.
Josephine.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
6:30 AM

Post #8216520

Josephine...The 50% is species, but is that meaning 50% of your property has to be planted with natives? Or is it of planting you have 50% are to be native species.

I am definately interested and have been working on more natives, not sure how to determine the ratio.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 17, 2010
7:18 AM

Post #8216617

I think she said 50% of what you have in terms of species.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
11:25 AM

Post #8217034

Yes at least 50% of the species in you yard or property have to be native.
I think the easiest way is to take a large note pad with three columns marked Native, Exotic and Question and go out and look at every plant shrub and tree in your yard, including grass, in other words take an inventory of every single plant.

Write down the plants in the appropriate column and that will give you a good idea of where you stand, then find out about the plants you are not sure about and put them in the proper column.
After you have enough plants to qualify you can send for the packet, and it will tell you what to do.

As a matter of fact, you can send for the packet even before you are totally ready, it will tell you which plants are good for wildlife and how to arrange them.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 17, 2010
1:26 PM

Post #8217195

Hm, I hadn't thought about grass, I still have a lot of grass in the back yard. Can I have beds and still have a wildscape?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
1:55 PM

Post #8217238

Sure you can Cheryl you just have to have the right plants.

This message was edited Nov 17, 2010 11:21 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
9:24 PM

Post #8217926

O.K. guys, these are the requirements right on the application, so you can see what you need.
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/pwdforms/media/pwd_906_w7000_backyard_habitat_app.pdf
gretagreenthumb
Wichita Falls, TX

November 18, 2010
6:45 PM

Post #8219527

Oh my gosh -- I had no idea -- native plants could be so pretty and addicting. Just reading this thread has caused me major "wants".

Question -- I live in the country with a very large front yard -- bermuda, of course, never watered. Do you think it would work if I ordered the Tx/Oklahoma Blend from Wildseedfarms and spread them on top of the bermuda? Boy, that would be a dream come true!

Other than that idea, I love the idea of less work using natives! And feeding butterflies, hummers and etc. Wondering if our dog and cat will cause problems.

This is exciting! New ideas to dream about all winter.
AJNTEXAS
Beaumont, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 19, 2010
5:37 AM

Post #8219911

Native American Seed is a good source of native seed.
http://seedsource.com/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2010
6:05 AM

Post #8219993

AJ, are you going to join the wildscape seed group? Please do.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Brenda, yes I do think it would work and that would be a good start, please sign up on the thread too the more the merrier.

Here is the link for both of you
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1141568/


Loonie1

Loonie1
Rowlett, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2010
10:21 AM

Post #8220382

Josephine, your slope is beautiful. Your hard work must be appreciated by everyone who drives down that street. You are an inspiration to us all.

Carla

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2010
10:23 AM

Post #8220386

Thank you Carla, I love native plants and wildflowers so much, it is neat to have other appreciate them too.
Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2010
8:37 PM

Post #8228042

The Slope has gone through some changes with the shorter days and the cooler weather, soon it will be all gone.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2010
8:40 PM

Post #8228046

What are the little red flowers?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2010
8:42 PM

Post #8228048

That is Salvia gregii and there is some Bluemistflower still left.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 23, 2010
8:53 PM

Post #8228050

Do you cut any of it back or is it left alone?
C

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2010
8:57 PM

Post #8228051

I cut all of it by hand all 800 square feet of it, it usually three or four sessions of about 3hours each.
Three hours is the longest I can squat, my legs hurt, but it is worth it.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 23, 2010
9:13 PM

Post #8228062

I understand that, its a lot to cut back.
C

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2010
9:21 PM

Post #8228069

Not only that, but after it is cut we shred it and compost it or use it as mulch.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 23, 2010
10:47 PM

Post #8228155

Bet that spreads a lot of seed too.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2010
4:54 AM

Post #8228266

Some plants yes, and that is why I always have so many to give away, I pot many of them and give to friends, to the native plant society for their sales, to the fielder garden, and the Molly Hollar wildscape.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2010
5:43 AM

Post #8228362

I enjoyed the tour of the Fielder Garden in Arlington this year. It is a small garden but has so much to offer the butterflies. Josephine and others have labeled each plant on the tour and a name and location list is available so you can see each one yourself. Of course it like the slope and our yards are getting into the winter sleep stage, but next year I would encourage those of you who can to visit that gem of a garden.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2010
9:18 AM

Post #8228621

Thank you Sheila, I would love to have everyone come to visit next year.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2010
11:52 AM

Post #8228799

My problem when I squat that long is I can't get back up lol. Will the wind ever stop blowing?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2010
11:56 AM

Post #8228806

The wind is blowing here too and the leaves that were close to being ready are all coming down.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

November 24, 2010
12:52 PM

Post #8228903

Maybe the next time I clean up it will be the last time. I have gotten around the squat. I sit down now LOL. I have a plastic tub lid that I carry around with me. If I am weeding for more than 20 minutes or so, I sit. It does expose me to fire ants on occassion but I can work for a lot longer without having my joints lock up.
C

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2010
2:12 PM

Post #8229068

After two back surgeries I can tell you the kneeler bench with handles is a life saver. It folds up and will flip over for a bench.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2011
8:31 AM

Post #8306487

Well, I have done a lot of squatting but the slope is all cut down by hand now.
Here is a picture with half cut to show the amount of plants, we grind them all and use them for mulch.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2011
8:32 AM

Post #8306489

A picture showing the cut side.
Dogs_N_Petunias
Cleburne, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2011
8:49 AM

Post #8306530

Josephine, please tell me about the crossvine on the fence. How far apart do you plant individual plants of crossvine? How long does it take to cover? We have a slope and chainlink fence between us and our back neighbors. Until now, we haven't had water faucet over there but we spent last week running 200 additional feet of underground waterline and now my dream of covering that fence is possible.

Glenna

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2011
9:24 AM

Post #8306597

Hello Glenna, that looks like a great place for Crossvine, I bet it will be beautiful.
We have ours planted 10 feet apart for good coverage, the vines can grow as long a 50 feet, but if they are very far apart it would take a long time to make a solid cover.
Ours covered the fence in about three years. I don't know how long your fence is but if you have to buy a lot of vines it could get expensive. I can give you cuttings from mine if you like, although they are slow growers at first, once they get going they do quite well.
Let me know what you would like to do.
Josephine.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

January 12, 2011
9:27 AM

Post #8306601

I got one crossvine at the spring trade and it finally started growing this fall. I am hoping it takes off next spring.
C

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2011
9:32 AM

Post #8306608

I am sure it will Cheryl, they are so lovely and care free, I also love the fact that I have never seen any harmful insects on them or disease either.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 21, 2011
6:12 AM

Post #8322002

Josephine on clipping and shredding your slope, did you put the seed heads in the composter also? I haven't put a lot in mine because separating was a pain. I was afraid it would be loaded with seeds I didn't want to spread.

This message was edited Jan 21, 2011 8:12 AM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 21, 2011
6:39 AM

Post #8322058

Yes, everything goes in there, normally there is no problem, and yes I get seedlings here and there, but not in the compost, mainly those that fall before I put them in.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 21, 2011
9:31 AM

Post #8322384

That is good to know. I have a chipper that I could use, but with the seed heads, I have been just tossing them in the green carts. That will make things easier and make more compost too.
AJNTEXAS
Beaumont, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 21, 2011
10:04 PM

Post #8323556

Most seed will be killed by the heat generated in the composting process.
Dogs_N_Petunias
Cleburne, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2011
4:42 AM

Post #8323697

frostweed wrote:Hello Glenna, that looks like a great place for Crossvine, I bet it will be beautiful.
We have ours planted 10 feet apart for good coverage, the vines can grow as long a 50 feet, but if they are very far apart it would take a long time to make a solid cover.
Ours covered the fence in about three years. I don't know how long your fence is but if you have to buy a lot of vines it could get expensive. I can give you cuttings from mine if you like, although they are slow growers at first, once they get going they do quite well.
Let me know what you would like to do.
Josephine.


Josephine,
Yes, I would like to start cuttings. What is the process? Is it best to wait until spring and use new growth as cuttings, or can they be started under lights?

We have more than 200 feet of fence I'd like to cover. Post oaks growing alongside a lot of it but about 50 feet that gets good sun. Wonder if something other than crossvine might be better in areas that get only filtered sunlight. I really want something that is evergreen.

Thanks,
Glenna

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2011
5:37 AM

Post #8323762

Hello Glenna, just the other day I was cutting back the plants along the fence and I found some crossvine runners that had fallen and taken root under the mulch, so I pulled them up and potted them.
I have 12 potted up for you, so when we see each other you can take them. They will need to stay potted for a while while they develop new roots.

As for cuttings it will probably be less trouble to pot them in the spring, but anytime you are ready is fine.
The crossvine will do well in shade too, although it may not bloom as much.
With 200 feet I guess you will need 20 of them, if I were you I would be preparing in advance the areas where you are going to put them, so they will have a good home when they are ready to be planted.

I am getting excited about your fence already!!!
Josephine.
cindylove
Lewisville, TX
(Zone 7b)

January 22, 2011
2:29 PM

Post #8324544

Oh Josephine... THANK YOU so much for all your wisdom & encouragement!! I am even more excited to start my garden. I wish I could have it as large as yours as I want too many flowers already!! hahahahaha. However I am hoping it will be large enough. The downside is I have to have approval from management here to dig another one & I want to incorporate a few boulders too..so I am still in the planning stage. Two years seems forever but I want to do it right!!!
I read on one of the Tx native pages that March is the best time to plant any natives as this gives them time to get established before the heat of summer!!
However, I need 5 weeks for my garden bed to prep before that can happen.
IF anyone needs a TX Native plant nursery in the Denton region I have an excellent one. It's the closest one to me that I found have all that I want & then some!!!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2011
4:37 PM

Post #8324756

Hello Cindy, it is very nice to see people excited about their gardens. Take your time half the fun is in getting there.
Fall, Winter and early Spring are the best times to plant, but you can plant almost any time, except during the very hot months, as long as you keep the soil moist until the plants get established.
What is the name of that nursery?
cindylove
Lewisville, TX
(Zone 7b)

January 22, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8324903

the nursery is called Painted Flower Farm located in Denton... http://www.paintedflowerfarm.com

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2011
7:45 PM

Post #8325083

It looks very nice Cindy.

dfwdennis

dfwdennis
Grapevine, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2011
8:24 PM

Post #8325123

Wow, they have an impressive list of Texas natives. I have never heard of them. I wonder if they are new?
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 23, 2011
3:56 AM

Post #8325348

I'd have to have a gazillion dollars -- how would one choose from so many wonderful plants? Maybe one of everything!

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 23, 2011
6:22 AM

Post #8325522

Cindy...since you were impressed with the nursery, you might want to add them to the list so others can find them later. http://davesgarden.com/products/go/
cindylove
Lewisville, TX
(Zone 7b)

January 24, 2011
5:47 PM

Post #8328452

Thank you Sheila, I was wondering where & how I should do that. They are not new however...they were recommended to me by someone else too... AND their selections are amazing! Another thing is..they won't take "requests" for something they don't already carry however, if you have a seedling, seeds, cutting, they will grow it for you!!
I am like you Txgardener I wish they took credit then I would spend more!! hahaha. They only take cash or credit...I've checked other places & Painted Farm has reasonable prices.

Dennis... they are so easy to find too... I actually drove by the road the first time there!!!! hahahaha

dfwdennis

dfwdennis
Grapevine, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 24, 2011
5:50 PM

Post #8328458

I see a field trip to Denton in my future. :)
cindylove
Lewisville, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2011
7:38 AM

Post #8342485

I fell in love with the place as soon as I started walking around!! Bring a wagon as there are no carts available!!! The smallest size is a gallon & it's $7... there is only one other size which is $11 & they only take cash or check. They lay out the plants on grass & tables so there are no set pathways..know what I mean?
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 1, 2011
9:37 AM

Post #8342779

I agree Dennis, I am always up for a drive that involves plants.
C

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2011
10:11 AM

Post #8342878

Hey Guys, this is what the slope looks like right now. Thank God for the Crossvine, and the Yuccas.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2011
11:18 AM

Post #8343105

But it won't be long before the sun makes everything start growing again. It will look all fresh and perky for the summer.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2011
4:59 PM

Post #8343871

All I keep telling myself is that all the ice and snow will melt and all the nitrogen will be good for the soil! LOL
realbirdlady
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 2, 2011
11:23 AM

Post #8345232

I really do think this is good for the natives (and another bit of cold coming next week, apparently). We're just sort of having the normal wet and cold of winter a little bit offset, after Nov and Dec were so warm and dry. I think a lot of seeds that three weeks ago wouldn't have been able to germinate this year, will be making a go of it now that they've been watered and frozen.

Sucks to be sub-tropical...
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 2, 2011
12:48 PM

Post #8345395

I hope not this much cold next week, had my fill of cold hands and feet.
C

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 2, 2011
1:04 PM

Post #8345425

I am hoping things will improve next week too, it is just too cold and dangerous, and absolutely boring.
Josephine.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 2, 2011
1:08 PM

Post #8345432

Boring is right, how many tv shows or movies can one human being watch. I have been looking at plant and seed catalogs and looking online at my favorite nurseries. I am grateful they cancelled schools and even if school is in session tomorrow I won't make the long commute to Carrollton.
C

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 2, 2011
1:14 PM

Post #8345445

Believe it or not, I have been sorting through outdated important papers for shredding or recycling, how exciting can things get?
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 2, 2011
1:31 PM

Post #8345475

LOL ok that is bored. Well think how good the warmer weekend will feel. I might be too scared to go and check on my plants though. I actually feel guilty I didn't do something to help them out. I did clean and mop the kitchen last night so at least my messy house is getting cleaner.
C

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 2, 2011
1:40 PM

Post #8345498

I wish I could say the same Cheryl, my kitchen is 45 degrees right now, since I have the door the leads to the garage open to keep the plants from freezing. So I make a quick in and out dash when I need something.
I do have a door between the kitchen and the living room or I wouldn't be able to do that.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 2, 2011
1:44 PM

Post #8345503

We think of all kinds of things when we have to. I wouldn't stay in a 45 degree kitchen either!
C

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2011
2:03 AM

Post #8356627

Hello frostweed and Texas gardeners --
I hope you don't mind an out-of-state visitor dropping by. I would say I'm here for the warmth but you've had it as bad as we have lately. And we have another blast of arctic air coming here later this week ... down in the low teen's or single-digits again. But enough of the bad news.

frostweed, I was intrigued by your comment in another forum about your garden being all native plants. I moved into this house year before last and had nothing but grass (and weeds, of course), trees and some long-neglected azaleas. So I have begun to plant ... and have located a couple of wonderful nurseries here in TN that specialize in native plants. Thus I've been "touring" your yard and gardens this morning for inspiration. Wonderful!

I hope you don't mind if I hang out here a little while. Some great ideas to be had!

newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 6, 2011
2:12 AM

Post #8356629

Welcome! Ms. Frostweed is a wealth of information about native plants. TN has some fabulous wildflowers if my memory serves (lived in Nashiville a short time many years ago). Past my bed time but check out other posts on here too.
Cheryl

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2011
2:47 AM

Post #8356636

Thank you, Cheryl ... I didn't think anyone else would be here at this time. :)

Yes, TN has some wonderful wildflowers and native plants. I'm sure we share some, if not many, in common given the size and variety of the state of TX. I saw the crossvine and I had already planted that on one of my chainlink fences. I had hoped to save the fence but it now needs replacing; however, with the crossvine being fairly well established, it should take off quickly again on the new fence even if I have to do some rather severe cutting back.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2011
6:14 AM

Post #8356822

You two are up early. I have visited Josephine's house several times and can atest that she is an avid native gardener. Her and Frank have taken up all of the grass and laid out a master plan that will be in full bloom this year, I can't wait to see it.
If you were close she would no doubt share a wealth of plants with you as she does with each of us in this area.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2011
6:15 AM

Post #8356827

Hello Cville, good to have you here. I am sure we share a lot of native plants so we should be able to share information and learn from each other.
I am so glad you came over for a look and I hope you will be a regular visitor and contributor.
Josephine.
realbirdlady
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2011
6:44 AM

Post #8356867

There are some great native azaleas and other rhododendrons in your neck of the woods. Lots of other pretty understory plants with berries.

TN isn't as big as Texas (of course. Who is? Big whoo, they just look bigger because they are covered in ice), but yall similarly cover a lot of different ecosystems. You might keep an eye also on Kentucky and even the near parts of Missouri for ideas and plant sources.

Have fun!
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 6, 2011
9:16 AM

Post #8357157

My memories of TN are of a very green place, plant wise that is. Lots of rainfall and hot humid summers in Nashville and just perfect for growing a lot of different plants. Not exactly like here in N. TX but certainly milder than the midwest where I grew up. I think there was one slushy snow fall the one winter I spent there and very mild temps.
C

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2011
10:45 AM

Post #8357313

Thank you all for the pleasant welcome!

Yes, it is very green here and usually ample rainfall through the hot summers although last summer was very dry. I got a bit weary of hand-watering the new plants. And this winter has been a real bugger. We've had snow and ice every week since before Christmas. It has been down to 9* with many nights in the teens. So far, the plants look mostly okay, but it is still too soon to tell about some of them ... and Feb is usually our coldest month. :(

I have been looking at the native azaleas/rhodies and many of the other natives recently. Quite a few to choose from and several nurseries that specialize in them. And, yes, numerous different ecosystems here. If I had the manpower (hubby is disabled) I'd tear up the entire backyard which is fairly large. I may hire someone to help me do some work and try to tackle perhaps 1/3 of it at a time.

I now have numerous perennials that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. We had so many bfs last year, I was amazed! I'm excited to see what happens this year. Our yard is now a certified Monarch Waystation and I have plans to expand my bf garden this Spring.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

February 6, 2011
11:29 AM

Post #8357379

How wonderful, please post some pics when its blooming/attracting the butterflies.
C

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2011
12:31 PM

Post #8357446

I will post some pictures, I hope, although my photography is sometimes rather poor (understatement).

I am pondering what has been written about Bermuda grass. I do have quite a bit of it in the backyard but it appears that you all just dig and plant and let things shade out the Bermuda. That certainly sounds like a good way to go about it.

I am still clinging to my desk here in order to keep from falling onto the floor after reading about the person who killed all those acres of wildflowers to plant Bermuda grass. Ummmm ... I don't even know what to say about that ... dumbfounded would be a gross understatement!!!

Here is one of my resources in TN:
http://www.sunlightgardens.com

You all have a lovely rest of the weekend.



TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2013
6:35 AM

Post #9378961

I know this is an old thread but I have questions about my effort at sowing wildflower seeds. Following the guidelines of a couple of TX wildflower sites, I got the area all prepared (and had to constantly battle the growth of weeds and invasion of stray cats) and finally sowed the seeds at the end of November 2012 -- nothing has germinated as of today --- am I expecting results too soon? Haven't had much rain (changing as I write this) and have done practically no watering. Also, I have seeds for a couple of things that will probably get larger than the wildflower perennials (I think frostweed and forget what else). Can I sow those now? Throw 'em out like I did the earlier sowing? Any thoughts and opinions would certainly be appreciated...
Mary

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2013
12:39 PM

Post #9379249

Hello Mary, and thank you for bringing this thread up to the top, all the things in it still apply and are good information.
You can scatter the Frostweed and other seeds now, but be prepared for a long period of building up your stock.
It took us 5 years to get the slope totally full, but every year it gets better.
I think that water is very important for seedlings and new plantings, so if it doesn't rain you need to water at least once a week to get them started.

Please keep us informed about your progress and be sure to show us some pictures too.
Good luck with your project!!
Josephine.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

January 8, 2013
1:25 PM

Post #9379292

Oh please take some pictures! I love to see how a new garden progresses. If you want good coverage until the perennials take off did you plant any native annuals?
Coreopsis tinctora and basalis make quite a show and germinate in mass.
Tahoka daisy does the same.
C
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 9, 2013
11:48 AM

Post #9380171

I sowed a wildflower mix with some additional seeds for bluebonnets and ... mixed 'em too long ago so I don't remember what else. Right now my little area has one tiny little agarita transplant and a small but multibranched TX mountain laurel. And we are currently getting quite a bit of rain so I'll be checking in a few days for any 'sprouts' -- crossing my fingers. Throwing any more seeds will be delayed as I might melt if I get out in the rain!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 9, 2013
12:34 PM

Post #9380206

This rain is really wonderful, 21/4 inches here, Enjoy!!!

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 9, 2013
5:29 PM

Post #9380497

wildflowers aren't fooled that much by warmer weather in January- they know when their daylite hour req'ments are met and come on then, so don't get disappointed- they'll be along...
cindylove
Lewisville, TX
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2013
9:16 AM

Post #9389150

I've had bluebonnet sprouts for a few months now...no blooms of course but I am really happy as I've never had success with them before!
I bought some "Alamo" bluebonnets when we were in San Antonio last year. They will be red if these are them.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 18, 2013
10:44 AM

Post #9389233

Congratulations!! bluebonnets are picky about where they will grow, so it is always a joy when they decide they like it at your place.
cindylove
Lewisville, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 19, 2013
3:38 PM

Post #9455107

I am REALLY happy now, as my bluebonnet is in bloom & I also have the "Alamo red" in bloom as well!!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2013
4:43 PM

Post #9455163

Josephine, I know you have nothing better to do with your time, but it would be cool to have a monthly look at the slope to see what it looks like through the year.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2013
5:47 PM

Post #9455228

Congratulations Cindy, bluebonnets are so beautiful!!!
Stephanie I will try to take pictures often, but can't really promise.
Josephine.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2013
7:04 PM

Post #9455324

My bluebonnet is just starting to send up a bloom and I'm in zone 8a I have zone envy.
Gypsi
Fort Worth, TX

March 19, 2013
8:40 PM

Post #9455446

neat thread. I have sprouted one bluebonnet that I can see so far. I grow wildflowers to feed the bees...
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 21, 2013
12:33 PM

Post #9457132

I think one of the hardest things to remember is that most Wildflower seeds need to be sown in the fall/winter. Many of the stores have the seeds out now, which is misleading.
Gypsi
Fort Worth, TX

March 21, 2013
7:39 PM

Post #9457621

I put in my wildflower seed no later than January, before a rain if I can. Anywhere I can find a patch of bare dirt that I don't have "plans" for. I try to remove bermuda grass, rake and loosen the soil first. So I get a really good germination rate. Been running on the same bag of wildflower seed since 2006, I keep it in the fridge.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 21, 2013
9:39 PM

Post #9457724

Same here no later then Jan. but I really try to get them tossed in the fall. It always makes me mad to see the seeds out now and people wonder why they don't grow.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2013
7:49 PM

Post #9461997

Yes, me too!
cindylove
Lewisville, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 8, 2013
5:54 PM

Post #9476662

My bluebonnet is a surprise really as I didn't plant any seeds in that location!! hahahah...the trick is to keep the seeds/area moist but not wet. Sorry to put this thread on yours Frostweed!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2013
6:00 PM

Post #9476670

No problem, it is all good and talking about Texas native plants is what it is all about.
cindylove
Lewisville, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 8, 2013
6:03 PM

Post #9476674

yyeeahh!! ;0)

Cajun2

Cajun2
(Carole) Cleveland, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 8, 2013
8:46 PM

Post #9476853

What a great thread!! Josephine, I love what you've done. Looking forward to pics of your butterfly garden too.
I'm going to have to invest in a kit (or packet) so I can be sure I'm on the right track with my Texas native garden.
I think I'm doing ok though, even if sort of accidentally. We have a well, and it's an Arte$ian, but DH remind$ me it $till require$ electricity to get the water from the well to my garden$ Thusly, I have set out to incorporate VERY drought tolerant sweet things.

Thankfully, the butterflies and hummers love a lot of the ones I've chosen too. I love watching them dance on the Lantana, and dip in for a sip on the Salvia. I don't know if they're native or not, but I have quite a few surprises that survived our severe drought of 2011 and hubby's heavy hand. My passion vine, roses, gardenia and Texas sage performed beautifully.

This is so fun, and you're right... addictive! Making hubby AND me happy at the same time is fantastic!

p.s. I remember my MIL pointing out Ironweed on the property, but forgot what it looks like. (Can you tell she instructed me to pull them all up?) Can someone post a pic of a young plant? I just looked them up and the purple blooms are so pretty!! (and if I can ID them, I can hopefully get some seeds to share, right?) I need to post pics of my sweet yellow blooms that i'm certain some may consider weeds, but are so well-behaved, I actually welcome them every year. would love to know their names.

This message was edited Apr 8, 2013 9:48 PM
covenantgarden
(Carol) Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 9, 2013
1:58 PM

Post #9477794

I love the Wildflower Slope, Josephine! Reading about it has been an inspiration. Thank you so much for sharing it!!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 9, 2013
2:50 PM

Post #9477873

It makes me feel like I'm not the one who should be writing articles from Texas!!!!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 9, 2013
6:50 PM

Post #9478168

Thank you Cajun2, the words you speak are music to my ears, it makes me so happy to know that more and more people are becoming aware of native plants, and are learning to love them as I do.

Thank you Covenantgarden, I hope to meet soon at the R.U. and share plants with you.

Carrie, I think you do a great job with your articles, keep up the good work.

Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 10, 2013
3:01 PM

Post #9479169

Cajun2, here is a picture of an emerging Western Ironweed, maybe it will help you identify your plant;

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 11, 2013
9:20 PM

Post #9480851

Josephine, would you find it creepy if I drove slowly by your house once a month snapping pics?? LOL I really enjoy seeing this slope come to life and change through the seasons.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 11, 2013
10:37 PM

Post #9480887

Only if you let me be your escort! LOL! It isn't just the slope anymore, she has converted the whole front yard!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2013
5:19 AM

Post #9481023

Of course you girls can come by any time, that is what it is there for, to be enjoyed by everyone.
But you have to let me know you came by so I can give you a hug.
Josephine.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 12, 2013
5:30 AM

Post #9481029

Well, I'm envious. ♥

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2013
5:33 AM

Post #9481036

Tee, is that phlox on you picture? Good to see you here, I wish you lived closer.
Josephine.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 12, 2013
5:47 AM

Post #9481048

Yes, pink creeping phlox, Josephine. One of my faves. I really would love to visit that yard of yours. Who knows? Maybe someday. :-)
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

April 12, 2013
10:47 AM

Post #9481401

LOL - To a drive by wildscape viewing! I actually need to do that myself. I haven't seen it in the spring.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2013
11:14 AM

Post #9481426

That is a lovely bed you have there Tee, phlox is one of my favorites.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2013
1:11 AM

Post #9482122

Thank you. They were my grandmother's favorite and always make me think of her.

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