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Voting Booth: Soup or stew time! What is your favorite?

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(Zone 7a)


November 15, 2010
9:50 AM

Post #8212853

There are a total of 168 votes:


We love vegetable soup. (made with your own veggies?)
(27 votes, 16%)
Red dot


Clam or seafood chowder here!
(19 votes, 11%)
Red dot


Chili is a favorite in our house. (secret recipe?)
(47 votes, 27%)
Red dot


Bean soup, with or without ham.
(26 votes, 15%)
Red dot


Chicken noodle or turkey noodle is our favorite!
(18 votes, 10%)
Red dot


Other? (share a recipe!)
(31 votes, 18%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 15, 2010
10:01 AM

Post #8212879

wow...first...cool!

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 15, 2010
10:43 AM

Post #8212971

Italian wedding soup and minestrone are also big favorites in our house.

ridesredmule

ridesredmule
Barnesville (Charle, GA
(Zone 8b)

November 15, 2010
11:27 AM

Post #8213045

I love to make chili, it is almost a vegetable soup.
I have Beef, tomatoes, onions, garlic, celery, chili powder, cumin.
Love Chili...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2010
11:45 AM

Post #8213082

Amazing to see this topic ~ lol

On the stove right now... Chili.

I love all the homemade soups but when the weather chills and is gloomy, Chili comes to mind.

With beans of course, onions and shredded carrots. We like it sweet so when near the end of cooking, I add brown sugar.

With a salad and homemade biscuits ~ YUM!

Its' what's for dinner ~ of course.

This message was edited Nov 15, 2010 1:59 PM
Steve812
Prescott, AZ
(Zone 7a)

November 15, 2010
1:02 PM

Post #8213182

I buy turkey chili in cans and add my own ancho chili pepper, chili powder, smoked paprika, salt, pepper & habanero sauce. I add a little olive oil and stick it in the microwave for three minutes until the ancho pepper has darkened a little and the soup is very hot. Then I add chunks of room temperature cheese and eat the dark, thick mixture by scooping it up with tortilla chips. Turns out to be better than anything I can make from scratch. And I can eat chili inside three minutes of thinking about it.

On the rare occasions when I do make it from scratch, I always serve it with fresh-made skillet cornbread.

YUM
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 15, 2010
3:37 PM

Post #8213458

I chose 'other' because I couldn't choose... I love all of the above. But, like Steve, there's always a pan of cornbread handy to make it even better...

psychw2

psychw2
(Pat) Kennewick, WA
(Zone 5b)

November 15, 2010
4:17 PM

Post #8213576

We just made beef stew today for lunch! I almost picked "other" because the only one we don't make is the chicken noodle. No reason, just don't.

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 15, 2010
4:37 PM

Post #8213614

And that's the one I make most, by request from my boys. They could eat chicken noodle every day.
3pmp
Slocan, BC
(Zone 3a)

November 15, 2010
4:42 PM

Post #8213622

I make chili with ground turkey breast and red pepper with onion and chili powder. I sometimes put hot chili peppers in with the mix also to give it some tang. I am not a big fan of hot peppers in chili. I like it over top of rice though to make it go farther.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

November 15, 2010
4:45 PM

Post #8213630

Love gumbo made with homegrown peppers, okra, tomatoes, onions & squash.
tamberlin
Framingham, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 15, 2010
4:46 PM

Post #8213635

Muligatawny soup. Chicken stock, chicken, bacon, granny smith apples, carrots, cream, curry over rice. Yummy!

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 15, 2010
4:54 PM

Post #8213654

Tamberlin, I've never heard of that! Got a recipe you want to share? Sounds interesting. . .I've never had soup with apples. I do have a recipe that puts diced granny smith apples in stuffing, with pork chops baked on top, so I bet it would be great in soup, too. :)
TroubleX2
Montgomery, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 15, 2010
9:09 PM

Post #8214088

Potato Soup is my favorite soup, my mom's recipe:

Peel, cut into bite size chunks three pounds of potato, cover with cold water. Boil till fork tender. Drain off water. Add one chopped onion, and whole milk to cover potatoes, add pepper lots of it, simmer for 30 minutes, add 1 can of creamed corn and a stick of real butter. When the whole stick of butter has melted, eat and enjoy.

This message was edited Nov 15, 2010 11:24 PM

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

November 15, 2010
9:42 PM

Post #8214114

Love it ALL, but have to say chili is prob the fav.
Proud to say I won 1st place in our chili cook off at church.

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

November 15, 2010
10:45 PM

Post #8214144

I make a very good seafood stew. Vegetable broth, potatoes, onions, tomatoes and any seafood you can find. It's time to make some, so, off to the market tomorrow.

This message was edited Nov 15, 2010 11:51 PM
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

November 16, 2010
6:41 AM

Post #8214480

Will have to try that Potato Soup. It is one of my favorite soups. But I voted for other because I also love to make Cabbage With Turkey Mealballs Soup. Its raining right now and I'm thinking a nice hearty soup would taste reallly good for dinner tonight.
With cornbread always.
mamasita
Southern Dutchess Co, NY
(Zone 5b)

November 16, 2010
6:46 AM

Post #8214489

Chili! I made a large pot of it a couple of days ago. For me, it's more an event than a throw-together meal and includes beef and/or pork cubes and hot turkey sausage followed by the seasonings, peppers and beans. My other favorite style is a chicken chili with hominy. Soups and stew are not far behind, but I've never been a big fan of chowder.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 16, 2010
7:20 AM

Post #8214559

What ? No selection for All of the Above?? We look forward to all kinds of hot soups and stews in winter. Fresh hot bread with it, and plenty of butter. Yum.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 16, 2010
7:30 AM

Post #8214591

Soups and stews are naturals for winter hunkering down. No matter which you chose, it is wonderful to walk in from outdoors to the tantalizing smell of something hot and hearty on the back burner.
TroubleX2
Montgomery, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 16, 2010
9:39 AM

Post #8214843

marti001,
This recipe I know is 60 years + old.
Handed down to me from my Mom.
Eaten warm it's potato soup/potato chowder.
Eaten cold with green onion added it's Vichyssoise.
Would love to have the Turkey/Cabbage recipe.
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

November 16, 2010
1:01 PM

Post #8215186

Make "Rainbow" soup by choosing vegetables of different colors and make them into
vegetable soup. Could add grains for brown etc.
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


November 16, 2010
2:02 PM

Post #8215297

Soups, chili, and stews are great for fall weather. Only two, that I don't like are peanut and split pea. I prefer a soup not something that is thicker than most gravies. Actually my favorite is the old depression special "White Rock" soup. The story goes that a hungry hobo showed up at a farmers door and asked for something to eat. The farmers wife turned him down. He then asked if coul have a pot of boiling water. She made the mistake of asking why. To which he replied ;" Well, I have this special rock rock here. All I need is a pot of boiling water to make the most delicious soup." Intrigued, she invited him in a put a pot of water on the stove. He dumped in the white rock rock and began stirring. Then he said, " its coming along swell, but if I have a few potatoes to add it would be even better" she agreed. In a little while he spoke up again, "it would be even better if i had a few scraps of meat to add. The story gets pretty long, but even today in my neck of the woods, a soup made from whatever meat and vegetables are available on short notice is called White Rock soup. No recipe just throw in everything available.

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

November 16, 2010
2:07 PM

Post #8215308

When I was a kid, we called it Stone Soup. Yummy!!!
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

November 16, 2010
2:12 PM

Post #8215314

To make Turkey/Cabbage soup is very easy. The Cabbage soup part is like a veggie soup, but add lots of cut up cabbage, onions, parsley, carrots, diced tomatoes. Sometimes I make it with veggie bullion, sometimes with chicken bullion. For the turkey meatballs you will need

1 lb of ground turkey
garlic and salt and pepper to taste
instant rice
chopped onions
cumin
parsley

Mix all ingredients together and make small meatballs. To be added to Cabbage soup after soup has come to boil and veggies are almost cooked.

Note: the ground turkey I like to use is not the all white meat turkey, it seems to make tough meatballs. I use Jennie O's ground turkey. It comes in a brown plastic wrapper.

Marti
Pewjumper
Glenwood Springs, CO
(Zone 5b)

November 16, 2010
3:44 PM

Post #8215445

This recipe came from a small gathering of friends that I inviited over for dinner & turned into a major event with people on the back deck & front porch. The guest list exploded from 6 people to 21! I trully was experincing first hand the party that Frodo Baggins had before he left his home in "The Hobbit"! LOL! I had to play the part of Iron Chef, literally grabing things out of the frezer and the pantry.

Oh my poor little wine cellar took a beating! But the gathering is now a fond memory I shall always cherish.

You can make this into a soup, a stew, pasta sauce, or a gumbo.

This recipe is meant to be changed! obviously most people don't have elk sausage, but I can litteraly get as much bulk elk sausage as I want!

Enjoy!

UNCLE SONNY'S CAJUN PARTY
YOU CAN MAKE A MYRIAD OF THINGS FROM THIS!
SERVES 12+

2 LARGE CHOPPED ONIONS
4 CHOPPED BELL PEPERS
1 HEAD OF CHOPPED CELERY

SEASONING MIX:
8 WHOLE BAY LEAVES
4 TSP SALT
2TSP WHITE PEPPER
2 TSP CAYENNE PEPPER
2 TSP BLACK PEPPER
3 TSP DRIED THYME LEAVES
6 TSP DRIED OREGANO LEAVES
6 TSP DRIED BASIL LEAVES
2 TBS Chili Powder-try Penzy’s Spice for good quality & quantity on spices!

8 TSP MINCED GARLIC
2 Lbs ITALIAN ELK BULK SAUSAGE and/or 2 LBS ANDOUILLE SLICED ½” THICK
2 LBS RAW SHRIMP, FROZEN TO FRESH WILL WORK
2 LBS MUSHROOMS
8 OZ OR SO OYSTER JUICE/LIQOUR
3 SKINLESS BONELESS CUBBED CHICKEN BREASTS
6 Lb CAN HEAVY TOMATO PUREE + 1/3 CAN OF WATER, OR SUBSTITUTE SEAFOOD OR CHICKEN STOCK TO THIN PUREE AS NEEDED. See Paul Prudhomme’s books or website.
4 15 OZ CANS DICED ROMA TOMATOES
JUST ENOUGH VEGETABLE OIL SO THINGS DON’T STICK

Add chopped celery and bell peppers to a large sauce pot.

In a large frying pan heat vegetable oil on high and brown onion & minced garlic.

Add onions & garlic in with the other vegetables. Set the frying pan aside for the chicken.

Stirring constantly on high heat, sauté the vegetables until just heated through. Add diced roma tomatoes and bring to a boil. Turn down to a simmer.

In the frying pan, quickly brown the chicken, andoulle & elk sausage with a small amount of vegetable oil and transfer to the saucepot with the vegetables & diced tomatoes.

Bring vegetables, meat & diced tomatoes to a simmer, add seasoning mix, and stir thoroughly to mix.

Add tomato puree and bring to a simmer. This is the time to judge consistency for use as soup, sauce or gumbo.

Add mushrooms

Simmer for 15 minutes while stirring to keep from burning. Skim any oil from the surface.

When chicken is done & celery is soft, turn down heat, add oyster liquor & shrimp, simmer until shrimp turns pink.

Skim any oil from surface.

Serve immediately


This message was edited Nov 16, 2010 5:01 PM

Thumbnail by Pewjumper
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ridesredmule

ridesredmule
Barnesville (Charle, GA
(Zone 8b)

November 16, 2010
3:53 PM

Post #8215461

Sounds deliscious. Yum!!
Pewjumper
Glenwood Springs, CO
(Zone 5b)

November 16, 2010
4:08 PM

Post #8215482

I really want to hear from our international contingent!

Sonny

ridesredmule

ridesredmule
Barnesville (Charle, GA
(Zone 8b)

November 16, 2010
4:10 PM

Post #8215490

Sorry, I'm not international...☺
Pewjumper
Glenwood Springs, CO
(Zone 5b)

November 16, 2010
4:27 PM

Post #8215534

Well if you are down in Georgia there are all kindsa recipes floating around!

Gotta favorite? Speak up!

I will invite you to my place for some fun, food & fellowship!

Sonny
TroubleX2
Montgomery, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 16, 2010
4:35 PM

Post #8215551

Anyone got a ICEBOX FRUITCAKE or Old Fashion Teacake Recipes and willing to share them?
ericabelle
West Plains, MO
(Zone 6b)

November 16, 2010
5:15 PM

Post #8215702

We have a southwestern chili that we love!
Pewjumper
Glenwood Springs, CO
(Zone 5b)

November 16, 2010
5:30 PM

Post #8215743

Get them recipes up here!

A green chile recipe using pork tenderloin is great!

We have guys roasting fresh green chiles by the roadside August-October and the chiles ae absolutely deliscious!!! Not to mention that pork tenderloin is real cheap at the same time of the year.

Whata bout corn bread recipes?

Sonny
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 16, 2010
5:58 PM

Post #8215797

THE BEST CORNBREAD IN THE WORLD:

Heat over to 350
Put black iron skillet into oven to heat

Mix together:
1 cup flour
1 cup corn meal
1 tsp salt
3 tsp baking powder
1-1/2 tsp sugar

Make a 'well' in the middle of the mixture and add:
1/4 cup oil
1 egg
Gently beat the oil and egg together

Add:
1 cup milk

Mix all together

Remove skillet from oven. Add 1-2 Tbsp oil in skillet to cover the bottom.

Pour the cornbread mix into the skillet and return to the oven. Bake for 20-25 minutes until brown on top.

Enjoy!
TroubleX2
Montgomery, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 16, 2010
5:59 PM

Post #8215799

Here's a Cornbread Recipe that's great for the New Year!

Blackeyed Pea Cornbread
1 C. Cornmeal (I prefer Pioneer Cornmeal)
1/2 C. Flour
1 t. Salt
1/2 t. Baking Soda
1 t. Baking Powder
2 Eggs
1 C. Buttermilk
1/2 C. Oil

Add:
1 Medium Chopped Onion
1/4 C. Cream-Style Corn
1 Lb. Sausage Link (burton's is quite good)
1/2 C Shredded Chedder Cheese
1 C. Jalapeno Black-eyed Peas

Mix all ingredients and bake in a greased 9 X 13 pan at 425 degrees for 40 to 50 minutes. Let cool (very important to let cool before slicing)
Very good left over for breakfast.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 16, 2010
6:22 PM

Post #8215853

I picked chili as my favorite but I also love stew, chicken and noodles, potato and ham chowder, and several others. And always served with fresh bread or cornbread!!

patrob

patrob
Goldthwaite, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2010
6:57 PM

Post #8215921

Our two favorite soups are loaded baked potato soup and chicken enchilada soup, both full of cheese, sour cream, and lots of calories. We hardly ever meet a soup or stew we don't like, of course!
VA_Wild_Rose
Fredericksburg, VA
(Zone 7a)

November 16, 2010
7:27 PM

Post #8215997

Chicken Corn Chowder! I played and played with this until I got it to my taste.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chicken Corn Chowder

2 Tblsp. butter or margarine
1 c. chopped celery
1 c. chopped carrot
1 15 oz. can whole kernal sweet corn, drained
1/2 c. chopped onion
1 4oz. can chopped green chiles, drained (I use mild, but sometimes I add an extra can)
1 12.5oz. can of chicken, does not have to be drained (I use white meat only)
1/4 c. brown sugar
1 32oz. container of chicken broth
1 15oz. can cream style corn
1 10oz. cream of potato soup
1 8oz. container cream cheese
1 small can (I think it's 8 oz.) evaporated milk
Season to taste

I start by sauteing the celery, carrot, onion, and chiles in the 2 Tblsp of margarine, just to make them tender... maybe 10-15 min. Probably not necessary, since you bring it all to a boil and simmer later on, but that's how I do it. I season at this point with some garlic powder, adobo, salt and pepper, and the 1/4 c. brown sugar. I add the can of corn and the chicken at the end of this saute. Next, add the container of chicken broth, and bring it all to a simmer. Simmer on low about 10-15 minutes. Add the cream corn and the cream of potato soup, stirring in well. Bring back to simmer. Add the container of cream cheese. Break the cheese into smaller pieces and stir frequently until the cheese is all melted into the soup. Add the can of evaporated milk. Turn off the heat and let sit for about 15 minutes.

Stir well and serve!
TroubleX2
Montgomery, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 16, 2010
7:32 PM

Post #8216003

I've a recipe for Mulligan Stew I'm just going to have to dig out for you people!
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

November 16, 2010
11:45 PM

Post #8216221

I picked Other. I like them all, but I especially like Chicken & Rice, and all different kinds of Gumbo. Since winter came on it has been landfood Gumbo, but I am starting to want some seafood. I love that my DM always kept a huge pot on the stove with chili or beef stew going during our short Southern winters.
One trick she taught me was to always use 3 kinds of meat and to treat the veggies 3 different ways. The meat might be beef, lamb and some kind of sausage or hamburger. The vegetables were chopped or diced and divided into thirds. One third was carmelized at the start, one third was added with the broth as the soup was built and one third was added 45 minutes before serving. Same veggies, 3 different flavors and textures = wonderful!

strange2u
Hinsdale, IL

November 17, 2010
1:25 AM

Post #8216240

Just about anything thick and/or chunky with lots of flavor is a hit in my book.
gardenpom
Melbourne, FL

November 17, 2010
3:14 AM

Post #8216263

"Other" for me since my personal favorite is Split Pea Soup, which I make year-round.
strange2u
Hinsdale, IL

November 17, 2010
3:55 AM

Post #8216294

stews are my favorite
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
4:10 AM

Post #8216309

Yum! Split pea may have to be this next weekend and then stew and then bean soup and then...

Y'all make me hungry!

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
6:11 AM

Post #8216482

Farmerdill the story of the rock soup reminded me of a story my Mother told. My Grandfather had a general store, (see the picture)...and served chili there. A local man would come in quite often and the same thing would take place. He ordered a 10 cent bowl of chili which came with crackers, crumble them in his chili and then say..."I put too many crackers in it...may I get just a bit more chili to thin it down". He would give the man a spoon more of chili...then the man would ask ..."could I please get a few more crackers to go with it?" Seemed he did this a lot.

Thumbnail by Sheila_FW
Click the image for an enlarged view.

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

November 17, 2010
6:33 AM

Post #8216529

vote for other here. My DH makes a very yummy Cheesy Potato Soup! I have know idea how he makes it tho!! lol

Had beef stew on Sunday and his Chicken Salsa soup last night. Having Bean soup tonight...we LOVE soup!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 17, 2010
6:52 AM

Post #8216565

Have to share my new favorite soup that I just threw together one day. Don't know amount of ingredients b/c I just throw in what I want.

Chicken broth
Chicken
Fontoya Mango and Peach Salsa
La Piana Squash filled Ravioli

Bring everything but ravioli to a boil. Add ravioli and cook per package instructions which is 16 minutes for this ravioli.

Editing b/c forgot to say that I'm using chicken that is already cooked. Usually left overs from one of those Lemon-Pepper roasted chickens that at the deli in the supermarket.

This message was edited Nov 17, 2010 8:56 AM
gardenpom
Melbourne, FL

November 17, 2010
6:55 AM

Post #8216570

That sounds interesting. I never have seen Mango and Peach Salsa here, though.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 17, 2010
7:01 AM

Post #8216579

The one that I've been buying is in the refrigerated produce section. It's not with the other salsas. I've also seen a similar one at the farmers market. The mango is the best part of the soup! I suppose you could use regular salsa and add mangos and/or peaches. I've been thinking that a little extra corn would be good in it too. The salsa has some, but a bit more would be tasty.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


November 17, 2010
7:29 AM

Post #8216636

I keep a 1/2 gallon container in my freezer for Scrap Soup. I toss my leftover veggies, gravy and meats into the tub. When it gets full, I thaw it and dump it in the crock pot and add a can of diced tomatoes, some macaroni(if needed) and whatever seasonings I feel like on that day. You can freeze any amount of leftovers...even just a spoonful, so it is an extremely frugal soup.
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

November 17, 2010
8:11 AM

Post #8216698

melody, I used to do that, but I kept two containers. One for veggies, one for meat. That way if I just wanted veggie soup, I could just use the veggies. Now that I'm living in a place with a big freezer, I will start doing it again.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


November 17, 2010
8:15 AM

Post #8216708

Ohhh...good idea!
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

November 17, 2010
8:18 AM

Post #8216711

You can also keep the meats seperate. Poulty in one container, beef in another. I can't eat beef as I get really, really ill if I do, so I only keep a container for poulty.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
9:09 AM

Post #8216798

I dump the last of veggies in a freezer zip loc bag and do the same for veggie soup or veg beef. We eat so many vegetables now that I hate to waste them. They make a flavorful soup. I add cabbage, broccolli, and black beans to mine also. And always have to add a can of Rotel (tomatoes & chilies) to spice them up.
This is by far our favorite soup reciepe however...and so easy.

Mexican Chicken Black Bean Soup (approx 10 cups)


Boneless Chicken Breast (uncooked 12 oz.)
2 cans of Fat Free Chicken Broth
2 cans of Black Beans (shake before opening, do not drain)
2 cans of Rotel (tomatoes and green chilies)
1 can of Whole Kernel Corn (drained)
1/4th package of Taco Seasoning
Dash of Chili Powder

Slow cooker:
Coat the bottom of a slow cooker with cooking oil spray. Chop chicken into small pieces and sear in the hot cooker. After chicken is white and all pink is gone, turn to the medium setting. Add all canned items and seasonings. Cook for 6 hours.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 17, 2010
9:42 AM

Post #8216849

Here's general directions for Root Soup, adjust the ingredients to how many you plan to serve:

Brown some German sausage. Add a diced onion. Add peeled and diced roots (potato, yam, turnip, carrot, parnip, rutabaga, etc.), equal amounts of chopped tomatoes and broth. Season with thyme, garlic, pepper, and a dash of sugar. Simmer in crockpot all day.

I usually get just one of several roots for a good variety, 1 can each tomatoes and broth - but I'm cooking for 2 so you may need more.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


November 17, 2010
9:45 AM

Post #8216859

Oh, that DOES sound good!
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 17, 2010
9:47 AM

Post #8216862

And here's a quick soup: Caribbean Shrimp Soup (Serves 4-6)

Saute 1/2 onion, 1/2 red pepper, 1/2 jalapeno, 1 T ginger, 1 T garlic and 2 chopped carrots in olive oil. Add 1 C V-8 juice, 2 C stock, 1/2 t cumin, and black pepper. Bring to boil, then simmer 15 minutes. Stir in 1# raw shelled shrimp, 1 chopped zucchini, 1 chopped tomato, and the juice of 1 lime. Simmer 5 minutes until shrimp is translucent. Ladle into bowls and add 2 T chopped papaya to each.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


November 17, 2010
9:52 AM

Post #8216873

Now, I'm really getting hungry!

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
9:58 AM

Post #8216888

bonehead...sounds good. May have to try that one.

The previous one...not the shrimp one. not much on seafood.

This message was edited Nov 18, 2010 8:28 AM
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 17, 2010
11:02 AM

Post #8216995

t his thread has evolved into a neat mixture of good things to eat. THANKS EVERYONE!

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

November 17, 2010
11:03 AM

Post #8216997

Has anyone mentioned that DG has a recipe forum? You can find LOTS of goodies over there.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


November 17, 2010
11:18 AM

Post #8217026

The Cooking Forum is free access for everyone: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/cooking/all/
We also have a Recipes Forum that is accessible to subscribers: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/recipes/all/
ernbran
louisville, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 17, 2010
2:37 PM

Post #8217297

I picked bean soup because I have a wonderful black bean soup recipe that uses sun dried tomatoes. If anyone out there wants it let me know. I also love chili, vegetable soup. I am attaching a recipe for southwest soup which is so easy and very good. If there is a particular bean you don't like you can make changes. I do.

SOUTHWEST SOUP

Two lbs. ground chuck
One onion, chopped
Two ½ oz. packages Ranch style dressing
Two 1 -1/4 oz. Packages taco seasoning mix
One 16 oz. can each: black beans, kidney beans, pinto beans, diced
tomatoes with chilies, tomato wedges
Two 16 oz. cans white corn
Two cups of water

Cook meat and onion together until meat is browned. Stir dressing mix and taco seasoning into meat. Add remaining ingredients with juices from all. Add water. Simmer for 2 hours. (If mixture is too thick, add additional water.) Garnish each serving with shredded cheddar cheese, sour cream and sliced green onions, if desired. Serve with tortilla chips.

Makes four quarts. Freezes great.


Jimenez_Garden
Jessup, PA
(Zone 6a)

November 17, 2010
6:30 PM

Post #8217682

I like to make a soup with
1 lb ground chuck or stew meat cooked and flavored with adobo
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 cp mixed veggies fresh or frozn ( no Lima beans)
2 ears of white is sweet corn cut in quarters
1/2 onions chopped
1 Roma tomatoe chopped or diced
1 small hand of chopped cilantro
1 packet of sasón
1 tbsp of adobo or more to taste. Instead of salt
some chicken broth adds great flavor
and a dash of italian dressing or a cap of vinigar for an extra kick

it may sound crazy but I'm from PR and my hubby is from Mex. It is a great medium for the both of us with a bit of everything in between. Then my hub adds lime to his fresh bowl of soup to cut the grease and it realy brings out the flavor. But in this case I don't add vinegar or dressing
Jimenez_Garden
Jessup, PA
(Zone 6a)

November 17, 2010
6:33 PM

Post #8217691

I call it soup a la MexaRicana and I throw in a cup of rice for more texture and make it an asopado
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2010
7:17 PM

Post #8217781

Farmerdill...we knew it as "Nail Soup" and it was one way I finally got my children to eat beef-vegetable soup...they helped me gather the ingredients for the Nail Soup. Jo
OutsidePlaying
Laceys Spring, AL
(Zone 7a)

November 17, 2010
7:33 PM

Post #8217801

I voted for the vegetable soup because that is what I make the most, but it's really more like a beef stew or beef veggie stew. The heartier the better. We also love chili, potato/corn chowder, taco soup and anything else I can try or throw together. So I would have voted for 'all of the above' had that been a category.

Funny, we were invited to a 'Cast Iron Cookout' a couple of weekends ago. Our host cooked 3 different soups/stews outdoors in cast iron dutch ovens. We also had some back-up brunswick stew and chili in slow cookers inside. He used some new recipes he got from the Lodge cast iron cookware folks in South Pittsburgh, TN. The interesting thing is that the recipes specify exactly how many coals to use underneath the dutch oven and how many to put on top of the lid for the temperature control. He also cooked a fruit cobbler on the coals and it was yummy. Weather was cool and perfect for doing this.
hopflower
Santa Rosa, CA
(Zone 9a)

November 17, 2010
8:34 PM

Post #8217878

I love French Onion Soup with crouton and melted cheese on the top! No other time of year seems to host it as well!

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 18, 2010
4:58 AM

Post #8218078

A very special treat in our house was when my mom turned the turkey's leftover bones into a huge steaming pot of broth. In those days, it was not unusual to cook a 25-lb or 30-lb turkey for the Holidays because everyone drove down to our house, which was the family's official holiday gathering place.

In the largest pot she could find, she added the turkey's bones (no skin), 3 or 4 medium onions, a bunch chopped carrots and quite a few ribs celery (also chopped), a handful parsley flakes, salt and pepper. She added water, brought everything to a rolling boil, covered the pot and simmered it for 4 or 5 yours.

The resulting broth was golden brown and rich. it made the whole house smell just heavenly. She would strain away the bones and the aromatic vegetables and freezing half of it. The other half would be turned into what the family called Murielle's soup (my mom's name). In the hot broth, she put about 1 cup rice, which she simmered for 20 minutes. To that, she added 2 large cans creamed corn. She heated until it boiled again and served it with a garnish of chopped green onions and oven-toasted french baguette with loads of butter. It seems nobody worried about cholesterol 50 years ago. This simple recipe was inexpensive to make, satisfying and very comforting.

Nowadays, I cook a 12-14 lb turkey at least once a month. Turkey is good, lean meat. Both my wife and I love it better than chicken. I always turn the bones into Murielle's soup. She is no longer with us, but her soup's recipe lives on. I hope you try it and that it brings you comfort and satisfaction.

Sylvain.
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

November 18, 2010
9:26 AM

Post #8218590

What a beautiful memory of your mother! Nice recipe!
gavafriend
northeastern, AZ

November 18, 2010
10:05 AM

Post #8218680

I love almost every kind of soup or stew. The only thing I don't eat is pork or shellfish. This is my favorite time of year because of the soup cooking.

Here is the worlds fastest soup. 1 can mixed vegetables, 1 can ranch style beans. Stop there if you want and just heat them together in a pan.

Add a package of ramen noodles, with water and seasoning if you have more people to serve. That's it.

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 18, 2010
10:26 AM

Post #8218722

Silvain, what wonderful images that evokes! I can almost smell it simmering on the stove. Nothing warms you from the inside out like a lovely soup. Continuing to make Murielle's Soup is a beautiful tribute to your mom!
Tina_A
Caddo Mills, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2010
2:24 PM

Post #8219079

We love corned beef and cabbage, but we always have some leftover that we fight over to see who gets to it first. Now I take the last 3-4 servings add more cabbage, green beans, corn, okra, and a can of tomatoes and make vegetable soup. We love it and it is so good. I use the crock pot to make the corned beef though so it isn't salty.
TroubleX2
Montgomery, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 18, 2010
2:37 PM

Post #8219110

We love corned beef as well. I boil in plain water on the stove and pour the water off, add fresh water and the seasoning package, and it isn't salty at all.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 18, 2010
3:14 PM

Post #8219185

We love every kind of soup. Soup's on from chilly Fall to blustery Spring. Gumbo, chili, thick soup with beans and bones and cheater soups using box broth and leftovers in the fridge. Tonight we are having pho, a Vietnamese soup made with a variety of meats, fish, soy and veggies over rice noodles but a similar broth base. Ours will have tofu, fresh shrimp, Chinese napa, carrots, mushrooms, green onions, broccoli, cilantro and a variety of hot and sweet peppers. Star anise makes it distinctively flavored and fragrant. We top it with a drizzle of toasted sesame oil infused with Thai chilies and dunk with Chinese crullers which are not sweet.

The beauty of soup is it requires no recipe though there are lots of great ones. It's not a quick meal unless the ingredients come out of a can. Anyone who goes through the process of prepping soup ingredients knows it's a labor of love. Soup=Love.

Like Farmerdill, I'm not a fan of homogeneous soup. I grew up on soups like vichyssoise and potage parmentier and have never cooked them. I prefer my soup to have some stones in it. :>)
Laurel
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2010
5:42 AM

Post #8219917

One of our simple favorites is home made Tomato soup, but we love all types of soups.

Tomato Basil Soup

2 cans Crushed Tomatoes (or one quart home-canned crushed roma tomatoes)
2 cups Chicken broth
2 teas. sweet basil, crushed
1 whole mild sweet Onion diced
1 stalk celery, small dice
3 cloves Garlic sliced
2 tablespoon Vegetable oil
3 tablespoon Sugar more as desired
Salt and ground pepper to taste
1 cup cream

In a large stockpot, heat vegetable oil over medium-low heat. Add sliced garlic, finely diced onion and celery. Saute for 5-10 minutes, or until onion starts to caramelize.

Add crushed tomatoes;basil, sugar. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 5-10 minutes. Stir in chicken broth.Simmer 15-20 minutes then let cool a bit. Working in batches, puree the soup mixture in a blender or liquid-tight food processor. I prefer a hand held blender, which makes the whole process easier.

OPTIONAL: If you'd like a smooth texture to the soup, you should cool it and strain it at this point, working in batches, with a sieve. (I prefer the more rustic texture of pureed but unstrained soup.)

It can remain in this state (refrigerated) for a few days, until ready to serve. Without cream, soup base may be frozen, I try and use it within a month. The individual corning soup mugs are great for this, fill about 2/3 full, leaving room to add cream when reheating.

To serve, bring tomato soup mixture to medium heat, and then stir in cream. (In this way, you are keeping the cream out of the pureeing step -- which might whip it -- and also the heating-to-boiling step -- which might curdle it.)

randbponder
Hornick, IA
(Zone 4b)

November 19, 2010
3:49 PM

Post #8220865

I had to use Other, as It is really all the above. Some days, soup is the only comfort food that will work.
mcash70
Logan Lake, BC
(Zone 3a)

November 19, 2010
8:13 PM

Post #8221167

I used other, we love chili, stews, all types of soups, so good on a cold evening with warm bread or buns!
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2010
2:59 PM

Post #8222224

I went to a winter bazaar today. They served ham 'n beans w/cornbread, veggie soup, chili, and sloppy joes. They had every kind of dessert you can imaagine. What a wonderful, warm, friendly lunch. I got a German chocolate cake and it's freezing for next week. Lucky find~!!

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 21, 2010
7:50 AM

Post #8223105

Chuckle, I see cold weather has gotten the belly rumblins a shakin, Love teasin my fellow truckers with whats cookin for Thanksgiving-gets em homesick hard. All of the above, plus the additional recipes, my cornbread recipe is still the hot water soak method, but I cant handle jalapeno style peppers, just the cayennes I can eat like food, Cant handle seafoods either, sigh, I quit breathin fast. Potato soups, chicken soups, deer/goat/beef/pork chili barbecues-but everyone attends brings a dish to those shindigs, they are apt to last for several days. Yummmm
happgarden
Kansas City (Joyce), MO
(Zone 5a)

November 21, 2010
1:19 PM

Post #8223627

Do one of you guys have a recipe for clam chowder but with the red base instead of cream base? DH loves the stuff but no where around here sells it that way and being diabetic I am assuming that may be a better soup.

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 21, 2010
8:20 PM

Post #8224451

happgarden, I don't have a recipe I've tried, but when I put "red clam chowder" in the Google search engine, it came up with tons of recipes. Looks like it is also called Manhattan Clam Chowder and Rhode Island Clam Chowder.

Hope that helps!

edited to add: Don't know if you like spicy dishes, but this recipe sounded particularly good!

http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/allanas-zesty-red-clam-chowder/Detail.aspx

This message was edited Nov 21, 2010 11:29 PM
rntx22
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 21, 2010
8:23 PM

Post #8224456

Zupe Toscana (Olive Garden Soup) is my favorite. We also love brocolli cheese, potato, tomato basil, or beer brat soup

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

November 22, 2010
3:35 AM

Post #8224639

The 'red' base is just a different style as written above, 'Manhatten' chowder with tomatoes. Not touched here in New England--probably think that the red is eaten by Yankee fans.
happgarden
Kansas City (Joyce), MO
(Zone 5a)

November 24, 2010
8:44 AM

Post #8228588

rofl irisMA, apparently not touched in the midwest either, because you sure can't find it. I like the milk base kind myself.
Steve812
Prescott, AZ
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2011
8:47 AM

Post #8344953

The secret is on the second line: preheating a black iron skillet It produces a wonderful crust on the cornbread. I do the same thing, but instead of mixing corn oil into the batter, I melt 2-3 Tbs of butter in the pan and pour the rest of the batter into it. You get a sort of crispy fried bread thing going on with the crust which I find irresistible.

[quote="FlowrLady"]THE BEST CORNBREAD IN THE WORLD:

Heat over to 350
Put black iron skillet into oven to heat

Mix together:
1 cup flour
1 cup corn meal
1 tsp salt
3 tsp baking powder
1-1/2 tsp sugar

Make a 'well' in the middle of the mixture and add:
1/4 cup oil
1 egg
Gently beat the oil and egg together

Add:
1 cup milk

Mix all together

Remove skillet from oven. Add 1-2 Tbsp oil in skillet to cover the bottom.

Pour the cornbread mix into the skillet and return to the oven. Bake for 20-25 minutes until brown on top.

Enjoy![/quote]

FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2011
10:45 AM

Post #8345162

Steve, I've got a pot of veggie soup on right now, so I'm gonna try the cornbread with the butter, as you suggest. As much as I love butter I'm sure it will be awesome. Thanks for the tip!!
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

February 2, 2011
8:34 PM

Post #8346098

WHILE I WAS IN THE HOSPITAL LAST WEEK...BROKEN RIGHT WRIST SURGERY...A NURSE FROM TENN. TOLD ME TO ADD SHREDDED CHEDDAR CHEESE TO THE CORNBREAD BATTER. A COUPLE FROM CHURCH VISITED ME TODAY AND BROUGHT ME HOMEMADE CHILI...I WISHED FOR CORNBREAD TO GO WITH IT. JO
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 3, 2011
8:50 AM

Post #8346656

Steve, the cornbread was awesome. The crunchy, buttery crust was wonderful.
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

February 3, 2011
1:40 PM

Post #8347117

roadrunner

Didn't anyone tell you------------------- your not surposed to break things, expecially on yourself!!!!! Hope you are feeling better.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2011
5:40 PM

Post #8352145

DRAT...NOW YOU TELL ME!!!
I did receive a DG FIRST AID KIT from Melody...about 3 pounds of her "healin' chocolate fudge"...YUMMY!! JO
OutsidePlaying
Laceys Spring, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2011
7:47 PM

Post #8352385

Steve, that's how my mother always made her cornbread so that is how i've always made mine (heating the oil in the skillet before pouring in the batter). There issome difference in how we southerners generally make corn bread. We don't add flour, and I use self rising corn meal, white not yellow, and very little or no oil. I use buttermilk not regular milk and no sugar. Another thing Mother did was add a Tbsp or two of water (she never really measured) which she claimed made the crust crisp. I think it was really to thin the batter as needed.
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

February 4, 2011
8:21 AM

Post #8353047

If I break something, can I have some " healing fudge"!!!!

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 4, 2011
3:29 PM

Post #8353933

I've never tried making it with either self-rising corn meal, or with white corn meal. I'm afraid you wouldn't even deign to call mine corn bread, because I always add honey, and I've heard that is a no-no for Southern cooks. What's the phrase? Something about the sugar belongs in the tea, not the corn bread? LOL

I do use my cast iron skillet, and melt butter in it first. DH got me a cute little cast iron pan that makes 4 sticks of corn bread shaped like ears of corn, but it is a real pain to use when you have to refill it 8-10 times to use up one batch of batter. Each little corn ear only holds about 2 T. of batter. I prefer it in my skillet, cut into thick wedges, and slathered with real butter. :)

Angie
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

February 4, 2011
4:24 PM

Post #8354037

Angie...I have two of the "corn" shapes, and one like a cactus.

I just got back from mrv dd's house across the street...pinto beans and corn bread!!! Jo

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 4, 2011
4:29 PM

Post #8354048

A cactus? My kids would LOVE that! I saw one the made 3 rooster shapes once, but it looked like it would be very hard to get them to come out without breaking. No fun if all your roosters are legless and beheaded. LOL Well, headless might not be bad, but the only part of a fried chicken they like is the legs. . .

Sorry, what is mrv? I know dd, but mrv is new to me. Couldn't for the life of me think what it could mean. My rotten velcro? Mean ridiculous velveeta? My rebounding velociraptor? LOL Or maybe it is just a typo, due to your poor broken hand/wrist.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

February 5, 2011
4:05 AM

Post #8354769

YEP...TYPO...SHOULD HAVE BEEN..MY!! ACTUALLY, MY CACTUS MOLD IS BETTER SEASONED THAN THE CORN ONES...COMES OUT WHOLE. JO
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 5, 2011
8:25 AM

Post #8355218

I don't know any of the acronyms and just make things up as I read, e.g., in my mind Roadrunner had visited the marvelous dude across the street.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 5, 2011
9:51 AM

Post #8355365

I'm from Mississippi (and my mom was born and raised there), and everyone, north and south, wants my mom to cook cornbread. The recipe I wrote above is the one she uses. You can use white, yellow, or white/yellow meal. You can omit the sugar. Whenever I make it, it's crumbly, but hers is perfect every time, and even tho she's 90, she's still got the touch. I am SO GLAD she does. :) Her cornbread is To Die For.

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 5, 2011
2:11 PM

Post #8355862

Flowrlady, I didn't see your recipe above. Maybe I didn't look back far enough. . .? The recipe I use is labeled Amish Cornbread. Amazing how much variation there is between recipes for the same dish!
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 5, 2011
3:26 PM

Post #8356001

Yeah, I guess it's like meatloaf.. Everyone has their own 'special' recipe~~LOL
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2011
12:32 PM

Post #8384683

We love any kind of soup of stew. Especially in the summer, when we have fresh veggies from our own garden. Luciee :~)

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


February 21, 2011
12:57 PM

Post #8384725

Summer soup! Love it!
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

February 21, 2011
5:19 PM

Post #8385222

My DD brought me some homemade Split pea with Ham soup for dinner///and some cheesy biscuits she had made...Yummy. Jo

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


February 21, 2011
5:22 PM

Post #8385228

I'm jealous...we just had salad...split pea with ham is one of my favorites.

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