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question about compost tea

Lake Charles, LA




I am fixing to make a batch of compost tea, my question is, would adding coffee grinds be of any benefit to it and how about adding a little bit of bokashi. thanks










i

Dayton, WA

Well, the coffee grinds are loaded with nitrogen. They're also slightly acidic...What the hell is bokashi?

Lake Charles, LA

Bokashi is a way of pickling your food scraps, do a search on dg, very interesting. I am presently brewing a batch.

Dayton, WA

I'm guessing you use vinegar in the pickling process. I use vinegar to kill certain broadleaf weeds...don't know if I'd want it in my compost tea!

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Hehehe, no, Lettuceman, Bokashi is a cultured-type "compost" that is fermented, but I can see why rfonte would call it "pickled".

Here is a quick page I brought up on a search which will give you a fairly good idea of what it is, how easy it is, and the end results.

http://www.compostguy.com/bokashi-resource-page/

As to answering rfonte's question(s), the coffee grounds could go in your compost tea but you'd get better benefit from them if applied in situ. And if they have been brewed they will normally be of a neutral pH.

As for applying bokashi to your tea, if you are brewing tea (aerating) then that would be helpful as the bokashi life require air. If your "tea" is simply a leach then I think you'd be wasting your bokashi as the vital organisms within it would die.

Shoe, who admits to never have done Bokashi but has only kept records and research on it.

Dayton, WA

Thanks for that info. Shoe. Quite interesting, but I prefer my simple method of keeping a bucket under my sink for kitchen scraps (no meat). When it gets full or begins to smell, out it goes to my compost pile out back. I'm a great fan of simplicity!

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Ditto, here, Lettuceman.... scraps go into a container, then out to one of the bins, or to feed the chickens. As you said, "When it gets full or begins to smell,"... there's our signal to move, eh!?

By the way, how's your sales been this year? Still going strong?

Shoe

Lake Charles, LA

Its a form of pickling, I guess, the ph has to below 4 to be effective. There are many different ways to use the bokashi. It is the only way I have ever got my compost pile up to 130 degrees. Whats great about it, there is no smell while the bucket is in the kitchen or wherever you keep your scraps. Including meat and dairy products. Only a slightly sour odor, when u open the bucket.

Dayton, WA

Yes, my organic garden sales continue to be strong--increasing every year. I think more and more people are discovering what constitutes good, fresh food. They tell me they're getting turned off by the supermarket fare these days. No doubt you're seeing the same trend in your corner of the woods, eh Shoe?

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Thanks for that extra info, rfonte. Maybe one day I'll give Bokashi a try.

And yes, L-man, small farms/sales are increasing in this area. Most likely a lot of help came from the past food contamination episodes that plagues the Country and people now want to know their food source.

Happy Gardening, All!

Shoe

North Ridgeville, OH(Zone 5b)

You want info on bokashi composting? Heeeeeere ya go! :)

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/890510/

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