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Forum: Fruits and NutsReplies: 8, Views: 48
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Beach_Barbie
Kure Beach, NC
(Zone 9a)

November 21, 2010
5:43 PM

Post #8224196

I went to the hardy citrus expo in Wilmington, NC yesterday and was FORCED to buy a Flying Dragon Orange, Tea camellia and a Citrangequat 'Thomasville'.
All are hardy here and are plants that I have been wanting for a while.
Love it!!!!!
Barb
jujubetexas
San Marcos, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 22, 2010
8:56 AM

Post #8225150

That Flying Dragon is really good for grafting. You get about 30-40 seeds in each of those tiny fruits. They are completely inedible and leave a nasty oil on your hands if the juice touches you. Other than that, it is one gorgeous looking plant.
Dlmcgrw
Colton, CA
(Zone 8b)

November 22, 2010
9:02 AM

Post #8225160

Barb, Wish you luck with your new citrus. At the very least you should get some good lime like juice from the citrangquat. Don
jujubetexas
San Marcos, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 22, 2010
9:06 AM

Post #8225171

You should really try a Satsuma.
They are extremely cold hardy. They will be like Little Cutties but larger.

Miho and Seto are hardy to 14F
Brown Select and Owari are hardy to 16F
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

November 22, 2010
10:27 AM

Post #8225311

Barbie, I'm confused -- did you get a dwarf orange tree on flying dragon rootstock, or a flying dragon plant that you can graft something onto?
Beach_Barbie
Kure Beach, NC
(Zone 9a)

November 22, 2010
11:12 AM

Post #8225378

I love learning about all the different citrus that are hardy and edible.
AZgrammie, I got a flying dragon (Poncirus trifoliata). I'm not planning on grafting anything to it or trying to eat the fruit; I just love the look of the plant.
One question. Should I go ahead and plant my Citrangequat 'Thomasville' now, or wait until the spring?
Thanks,
Barb
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

November 23, 2010
9:20 AM

Post #8227061

Dang me, I don't have the faintest idea what a Citrangequat is!
jujubetexas
San Marcos, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 23, 2010
10:28 AM

Post #8227154

If you are on Trifoliate rootstock, it tends to go dormant during the winter which gives you very little root growth advantage. If you are on sour orange rootstock, the roots should continue growing during the winter.
The younger they are, the more sensitive they are to cold. So if you want to give them one season of growth to prepare them for winter, I would keep them in pots and bring them in if it gets in the 20s.

Beach_Barbie
Kure Beach, NC
(Zone 9a)

November 23, 2010
3:34 PM

Post #8227524

AZGrammie - I know! I looked at the label and went "huh??" Here's the parentage: Oval kumquat (Citrus insitorum Mabb) x Willits citrange ( Fortunella margarita).

jujubetexas - I'm pretty sure it's on trifoliate rootstock. Thanks for the info. I won't plant it in the ground until the spring and when I bring it in, it will be into the heated sunroom.
Good to have this info. Thanks! The learning curve continues...
Barb

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