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Article: Sweet Clover: Clover Honey

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Forum: Article: Sweet CloverReplies: 16, Views: 83
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eclayne
East Longmeadow, MA
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2011
5:04 AM

Post #8372951

Hi Sharon,
When I saw your articles thumbnail I thought the wrong photo was used by mistake. After all these years I just find out that clover honey doesn't come from Trifolium at all!! and learned about a new plant to boot. Thanks much,
Evan

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

February 15, 2011
7:46 AM

Post #8373220

I haven't seen that type of clover. Interesting as always.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

February 15, 2011
8:14 AM

Post #8373274

Lots of clovers, lots of honeys, and fun to learn about all of them.

Actually I'm a little bit partial to red clover, it's so pretty when it grows in abundance in a field, like a blanket of rosy pink. There's always a layer of insects floating above, and soft buzzy hums can be heard.

Hope your weather is getting better up there!
Thanks for reading the article.
Dollykat
Lucasville, OH

February 15, 2011
8:51 AM

Post #8373333

I've never seen clover like that. I didn't know it existed. Again, I learn something new from you. I know what you mean about the bees' concentration on their target flowers. When I am engaged in my futile attempts to weed my flower beds, the bees completely ignore me. Aunt Bett was a biochemist, wasn't she? Not on this subject, but pertaining to last week's cherry article ( couldn't post anything last week), I find this information: The cherry whose wood is used for furniture is a different variety, actually two varieties. The American cherry is Prunus Serotina. The English cherry is Prunus Avium.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

February 15, 2011
3:32 PM

Post #8373881

Good to know, Dolly, I seem to learn a lot from you as well.
It's gotta be the teacher thing.
eclayne
East Longmeadow, MA
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2011
4:16 PM

Post #8373976

Dear Sharon and Dollykat,
re: "...the teacher thing."
As long as you don't find the need to repeat yourself seven times! YES there's a teacher in the house.
Evan
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

February 15, 2011
5:26 PM

Post #8374116

Ha Evan!!

I never did believe that 'repeating 7 times' helped a bit.
How funny!

Wonder how many teachers are in the house? Probably more than we realize.
Thanks for the memory and the smile, Evan.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 15, 2011
8:42 PM

Post #8374445

Wow, I always wondered what those fields of lovely yellow wildflowers were! I learned another thing about clover today, thanks, Sharon!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

February 15, 2011
9:00 PM

Post #8374465

Pretty, aren't they, those fields...

Thanks KY, I appreciate your words.
jazzy1okc
Oklahoma City, OK

February 21, 2011
4:32 AM

Post #8383659

I certainly recognized this plant!
Where I grew up, farmers fussed about having too much wild clover in their alfalfa fields. I'm sure the bees didn't mind, though.
My first bee sting came when I succumbed to the allure of these two plants growing together in a field near where I rode my horse when I was about five.
The horse was hungry, so I got off to let her graze, laid down on that soft, green and blooming bed and shut my eyes to enjoy the smells and sounds.
The bee sting was in the middle of my back, so I must have almost crushed the poor thing.
I guess I went off like a rocket, running in circles, flapping my arms, and screaming.
Luckily, The Honey Man, who lived down the street from us in town, happened to be out checking his hives that day in that particular field.
He came running, like a knight in white, filmy armor, grabbed me by the arm, smoked me down, carried me from the field, and gently explained that the bees weren't trying to eat me but were intent on their work, gathering what they needed to preparing honey for me to eat during the winter.
Then he gave me a bit of honey candy.
That stopped my crying and started my lifelong interest in bees and other insects.
I really don't like to kill insects, even now, and I worry when bees don't appear when they should each spring.
Maryinhammondsp
Bath, NY

February 21, 2011
5:50 AM

Post #8383784

First honey bee sting

When I was about five, I got a new pair of shoes. They were black and shiny, and had a little strap that went across the instep and buckled at the side. I think they may have been called Mary Janes. Anyhow, I sure did love those shoes. I wasn't supposed to wear them out in the field to play, but I did. Very shortly, and Sharon will guess it, I bet, a honey bee got under one of those straps somehow. It got upset (who can blame it) and it stung me.

Ouch! I never did like those shoes after that!

PS -- Doggone it -- it's snowing again in Western New York!
BeeCharmer13
Bloomington, IN

February 21, 2011
7:45 AM

Post #8384059

Another teacher in the house - but teaching has morphed into tutoring learning disabled children. My father, grandfather, aunt, and cousins are/were teachers. I grew up grading papers for my dad. Growing up on a farm was sheer heaven for a kid like me - I was fascinated by the "micro" world of insects. Those days were full of homemade science experiments and taught me a lot about ecology and life cycles. Oh, and I have never been stung by a bee, hence my user name! I made innumerable clover necklaces as a kid! Thanks for another lovely article, Sharran!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2011
9:04 AM

Post #8384286

I love these stories!!!

I've had two episodes with bees. The first was when I created a slide down the back yard in a mess of overripe pawpaws. I'm not sure what kind of bees were buzzing around those pawpaws, but they surely didn't enjoy being slid upon.

The other episode occurred when a yellow jacket and I both went after the same bite of an apple.

Both events were my own fault, I should never have plopped my behind down on a hungry horde of bees when I slid down that slippery slide of pawpaws. And I should have looked before I bit.

Great knight to the rescue, Jazzy...honey candy, yummm.

Mary, yes, Mary Janes...loved them. I guess I shouldn't tell you it's been in the 60's here for about a week now. Wishing you an early spring.

BeeCharmer, thank you! A great morph for you, I think. Teaching can lead to admirable and exciting adventures.

Thanks so much for sharing your stories with us.
I love stories.
jazzy1okc
Oklahoma City, OK

February 21, 2011
2:57 PM

Post #8384923

Hey, Sharran!
Write an article about poison oak, poison ivy, and stinging nettle!
I promise I'll respond with stories and so will everyone else.
LOL
jp
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2011
11:49 PM

Post #8385715

I might just do that, JP...thanks.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 22, 2011
7:31 AM

Post #8386172

I'm just itchin' to see that one! *duckin' an' runnin'
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2011
9:12 AM

Post #8386383

Ha! KY.

Wordplay.
Love it.

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