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It's time now to VOTE in our 14th annual photo contest! Voting ends November 7, so be sure to cast your votes for your favorites in each category here. Good luck to all contestants!

Voting Booth: Which invasive plant is the most troublesome in your garden?

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Forum: Voting BoothReplies: 124, Views: 1,102
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(Zone 7a)


February 28, 2011
9:50 AM

Post #8397838

There are a total of 162 votes:


Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon)
(62 votes, 38%)
Red dot


Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica)
(9 votes, 5%)
Red dot


Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta)
(4 votes, 2%)
Red dot


Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata)
(3 votes, 1%)
Red dot


Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)
(3 votes, 1%)
Red dot


Alligator Weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides)
(2 votes, 1%)
Red dot


Blackthorn (Acacia nilotica)
(0 votes, 0%)
Red dot


Other. (tell us!)
(79 votes, 48%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 28, 2011
10:36 AM

Post #8397933

My villain is creeping buttercup - ranunculus repens. Not yet listed as an invasive plant in Washington, but is on the "weed of concern" list. Originally from Europe and is quite troublesome for me, although I do attempt to coexist with it -- I've had many non-gardeners complement me on the pretty yellow flower mixed here there and everywhere in my beds! And of course I do have fond childhood memories of holding the flower beneath our chins to see who likes butter.

poisondartfrog

poisondartfrog
Barbourville, KY
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2011
10:39 AM

Post #8397937

Glechoma hederacea, Creeping Charlie. Hate it. Hate it. Hate it.
Gwendalou
Langley, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2011
11:03 AM

Post #8397987

Buttercup. It's horrid and invades everything.

jeri11

jeri11
Central, LA
(Zone 8b)

February 28, 2011
11:03 AM

Post #8397990

cayratia japonica
nedweenie
Windsor, CT
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2011
12:46 PM

Post #8398194

I can handle whatever pops up in the garden. It's everywhere else that's a got a real problem-Japanese knotweed, Burning bush, Bittersweet & Multiflora Rose. And Barberry. And Phragmities (sp?).

This message was edited Feb 28, 2011 3:47 PM
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2011
1:18 PM

Post #8398260

Japanese Honeysuckle...noxious weed here, and our woods are choked with it.

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2011
1:45 PM

Post #8398310

Mouse eared chickweed, taking over my backyard
Hillbilly_Gran
Jasper, AR
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2011
4:59 PM

Post #8398662

poison ivy here-noxious in more ways than one.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2011
5:31 PM

Post #8398718

Bush honeysuckle and chickweed. The honeysuckle isn't a problem in my yard, though I have it, but in the woods around here. Also japanesse bindweed.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2011
5:44 PM

Post #8398753

That purple stuff that is in bloom. Both varieties. Wild onion, bermuda, ground ivy, honeysuckle, mimosa, morning glories, Johnson grass, and whatever else I do not want in my yard. I have tried to find out the name of the purple stuff but will have to keep searching. Luciee
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2011
6:10 PM

Post #8398831

Post a pic and someone will identify it for you.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2011
6:16 PM

Post #8398841

I found it on Dave's weeds. It is red deadnettle, Lamium Purpurum, and henbit, Lamium amplexicaula. Thanks! Luciee
Sashagirl
Davenport, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 28, 2011
6:46 PM

Post #8398933

I voted other.

I constantly battle Creeping Charlie. It "creeps over from two adjoining neighbors yards, even though I spray several feet of their property (with their permission) with weed and feed .

Milkweed vine is another pest. I keep all the starts pulled up in my yard but several of the neighbors let them grow wild.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2011
7:09 PM

Post #8398974

Other for me as well. It's Houttuynia Cordata 'Chameleon', beautiful but it runs rampant.

It's the very colorful leaf seen here:

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SusieR
Springfield, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2011
7:23 PM

Post #8399010

Creeping Charlie, Glechoma hederacea. Beautiful little lavender dragon flowers but invasive and annoying.

The Hottuynia Cordata is really pretty but I don't want any of that, either! :)

Hey- maybe we could swap and put them together in a hanging basket...!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2011
7:29 PM

Post #8399026

I've sent it to two people who really wanted it - one in Las Vegas and one in Arkansas. It died for both of them. How I wish it would just die for me. My helper and I sprayed it many times last fall so I'm hoping we finally killed it.
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2011
8:18 PM

Post #8399102

My least favorite invaders are bur buttercup and alfalfa. The people we bought our house from had nothing but dirt and weeds in the backyard and we're still digging out alfalfa roots.

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2011
10:48 PM

Post #8399215

My invasive is plain old sod grass. I can't seem to stay on top of it. I have borders on my beds but it just goes under them. I should have made them deeper.
bordersandjacks
Seabrook, SC
(Zone 8b)

March 1, 2011
2:25 AM

Post #8399269

Chinese tallow trees. They're everywhere and reseed like mad.

Privet. Can't kill it.

Chamberbitter. Horrible weed.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

March 1, 2011
4:23 AM

Post #8399353

The bermuda grass really likes my garden. It creeps under the fence and a 2 ft brick path from my neighbor's backyard. I'm finally getting a handle on it though the "war" has been going on for 20 years. It will probably find & cover me when I'm dead & buried. LOL
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 1, 2011
5:11 AM

Post #8399431

Hey pirl, I have seen cordata for sale. Thanks for posting it. I know not to buy it, even though it is pretty. Since this is invasive plant week, I will add some more weeds: white clover, monkey grass ,(just try to get rid of it) mondo grass, (been digging that up too) wild strawberry, nut sedge, canadian thistle, etc. I know all these are not invasive, but I'm just listing weeds. Luciee

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


March 1, 2011
6:21 AM

Post #8399643

I'm with the Bermudagrass group. It grows anywhere...in my flowerbeds, in my containers, under landscape fabric...under my paved driveway. In the event of a nuclear disaster, it would survive along with the roaches.

beclu727

beclu727
Dacula, GA
(Zone 7b)

March 1, 2011
6:58 AM

Post #8399730

I voted honeysuckle, since it has almost killed a few shrubs here. But my most invasive in the garden is Virginia Buttonweed. It started out in a small area and now its everywhere. Looks like a pretty ground cover with its shiny leaves and white flowers, low to the ground. It propagates via stem or root cuttings, stolons, and sets a huge amount of seeds. It got into my raised beds and I dismantled them last year. I want to use the chickens to kill it this year, they love it. Just have to get the fencing to be escape proof and let them loose...
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 1, 2011
7:01 AM

Post #8399737

Melody - I know the feeling. When we have something invasive that eats up our time in the garden we just want it gone now.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

March 1, 2011
8:11 AM

Post #8399933

Glechoma hederacea, Creeping Charlie; nut sedge (Last summer I bought a great big truckload of 'topsoil' and it was FILLED with nut sedge!!!) I'm just waiting for it to come up; I heard about some stuff called Sedgehammer, and I'm gonna try it.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 1, 2011
8:14 AM

Post #8399939

I've heard of Sedgehammer on a radio gardening talk show. Hope it works for you.
roseone33
Southern Mountains, GA
(Zone 6b)

March 1, 2011
8:17 AM

Post #8399948

Crabgrass!
roseone33
Southern Mountains, GA
(Zone 6b)

March 1, 2011
8:20 AM

Post #8399956

And plenty of bittercress too, and a whole lot of other stuff.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 1, 2011
8:24 AM

Post #8399964

Much as I like to feast on the himalayan blackberries (fresh, pies, jam), they are quickly overtaking large portions of our wild areas. Difficult to eradicate, although goats will eat them to the ground.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2011
12:45 PM

Post #8400524

Bahia.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 1, 2011
5:24 PM

Post #8401060

Dealing with crabgrass too. Don't even have regular grass in yard really. Just nasty, horrible crabgrass.
ericabelle
West Plains, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 1, 2011
6:13 PM

Post #8401202

Believe it or not - MONARDA! It is beautiful when it is blooming, but before it looks like a weed and after it gets mildew. I have been trying to eradicate it, but it just will not go away. Trying roundup this year.
salix_man
Barberton, OH

March 1, 2011
7:04 PM

Post #8401377

Only polite name I have is "Quack grass" Roots can go 2 or more feet underground and come up right in the middle of a daylily. Salt will kill every thing else in the asparagus bed, but not this.
Joyous1
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

March 1, 2011
7:15 PM

Post #8401408

Ugh...knotweed - the stuff is invincible.
DonnaB
Vancleave, MS
(Zone 8b)

March 1, 2011
7:46 PM

Post #8401473

Congon grass don't think I am spelling or saying it right
estrail1rider
Melfa, VA
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2011
5:27 AM

Post #8401889

crabgrass and chickweed!!! Hate the wild onions! They are all over too and worst to get out. Johnson grass is hard to get out too.
deb

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2011
7:16 AM

Post #8402063

Not sure what this weed is but I didn't have a problem with it until last year. It came to me with heavy rains washed down from other's yards. Again this year it is abundant like a massive ground cover. The picture is on a 2 x 4 deck railing to give prospective. It is easily pulled up but so much of it is daunting.
Other than that I guess the privets deposited by the birds are next.

Thumbnail by Sheila_FW
Click the image for an enlarged view.

luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2011
7:23 AM

Post #8402071

It looks like some form of Lamium. Deadnettle and hen bit have pink-purple flowers. I do not know of a blue flowered lamium, we do not seem to have it here. Luciee
Beach_Barbie
Kure Beach, NC
(Zone 9a)

March 2, 2011
8:30 AM

Post #8402155

Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon).
A few others, including Bittercress, can be bad, but this is far more difficult for me to control.
Barb

mrs_colla

mrs_colla
Marin, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 2, 2011
9:13 AM

Post #8402216

Bindweed and sour grass, aka buttercup.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 2, 2011
9:30 AM

Post #8402235

I've never heard buttercup called sour grass -- any idea where that came from?

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


March 2, 2011
9:33 AM

Post #8402243

Buttercup/sourgrass could possibly be Oxalis/wood sorel: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/38376/

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


March 2, 2011
10:28 AM

Post #8402356

Here's our newest DG contest:

Since we are spotlighting invasive species this week, we've opened up the DG Invasive Species Photo Contest. Winners will receive a 1 year subscription.

Come on over and share your images!
http://davesgarden.com/contest/invasive-species-photo-contest/

Thumbnail by melody
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mrs_colla

mrs_colla
Marin, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 2, 2011
1:05 PM

Post #8402619

Melody, that's it! I wasn't sure, the kids here call it sour grass... Thanks!
Christie
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 2, 2011
2:41 PM

Post #8402912

I voted other, I have so many different kinds of weeds, I don't know the names of any of them. Always pulling and cutting them down, I can't stand the fumes from chemicals, so it's a never ending job. I'm sure a lot people are going through the same thing. HELP!!!
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 2, 2011
2:48 PM

Post #8402921

Rosey -- mulch early and often, smothering is my best defense as I also do not use chemicals of any sort.
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 2, 2011
3:10 PM

Post #8402963

Bonehead , I just about went broke last year from buying Mulch. Of course it was around $6.00 a bag.
mcash70
Logan Lake, BC
(Zone 3a)

March 2, 2011
3:16 PM

Post #8402974

I voted for other, I have spotted napweed, bindweed, crabgrass, creeping charlie, wild daisies, chick weed, oxalis, dandelions, just to mention a few.

I don't use weed killers!

This message was edited Mar 2, 2011 4:45 PM
mtilton
Ada, OK
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2011
3:36 PM

Post #8403012

I have big trouble with a plant in the Cenchrus family. How can I get rid of this weed? Thank you.

This message was edited Mar 2, 2011 5:36 PM
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 2, 2011
4:41 PM

Post #8403137

Rosey, if you have the room for it, buy it by the pickup or dumptruck load - much less expensive but then you have a lot of work to do at one time.

McCash, love your typo "week" killers... ha ha... sometimes I think we subconsciously misspell things in our posts. Funny.
dwayne19
New Berlin, NY

March 2, 2011
4:44 PM

Post #8403140

My nightmare is burdock. So far it has been impossible to eradicate!
mcash70
Logan Lake, BC
(Zone 3a)

March 2, 2011
4:49 PM

Post #8403154

Thanks for pointing out that typo bonehead, it is now corrected.
salix_man
Barberton, OH

March 2, 2011
5:47 PM

Post #8403275

To dwayne. Back in the '40's we used kerosene on the root. Now I would used concentrate Roundup on fresh cut root. I had good success with that on blackberry canes growing under a big rhodie/
AYankeeCat
Fairfield County, CT
(Zone 6b)

March 2, 2011
6:11 PM

Post #8403324

Bronze fennel! I planted thre and now they are coming up ALL OVER THE PLACE!
JulieQ
Bella Vista, AR
(Zone 6b)

March 2, 2011
7:31 PM

Post #8403517

I voted "Other" for the awful privet I am trying to get out of my woods. Close second is honeysuckle...

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2011
8:35 PM

Post #8403662

Porcelain berry! Ugh! I don't consider a dandelion to be an invasive species:
http://www.newenglandwild.org/publications-and-media/articles/bill-cullina-articles/green-and-mean.html

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2011
6:12 AM

Post #8404067

AY...That bronze fennel brings in a lot of Black Swallowtail butterflies I bet. It is one of their host plants. I plant it for them to lay eggs on.
Each of us in the different areas have plants that others don't consider a problem. We just need to remember the ones on the invasive list for our area and keep them in check. Happy Gardening everyone!



Larval stage of Black Swallowtail butterfly

Thumbnail by Sheila_FW
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jmorth
Divernon, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 3, 2011
6:26 AM

Post #8404097

Creeping Charlie
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 3, 2011
6:36 AM

Post #8404116

Love my creeping Charlie!

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 3, 2011
6:48 AM

Post #8404134

I voted "other" - we are battling Running Bamboo!

For four years we battled Burmuda Grass, but have finally got it out of the garden by digging it up by hand and removing every tiny piece of root!
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 3, 2011
6:53 AM

Post #8404146

I don't blame you Pirl, Charlie is a cutie
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 3, 2011
7:33 AM

Post #8404247

Thanks, Rosey.

Has anyone ever successfully battled bamboo or is that a reason people move to another home?
garyon
Syracuse, NY

March 3, 2011
9:28 AM

Post #8404452

garlic mustard
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 3, 2011
9:45 AM

Post #8404475

I do have a weed in one of my flower beds that looks and smell like onions, I've been trying to get rid of it for years, no luck. They have little bulbs which are impossible to get rid of.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 3, 2011
10:33 AM

Post #8404552

roseycats - I've heard them called "wild garlic" and "wild onions". When they come up in our garden, we call them "food". They taste a little like chives to me.
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 3, 2011
11:16 AM

Post #8404605

I still don't want them, I want my flowers
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 3, 2011
1:30 PM

Post #8404816

Perhaps it's chives. If you've ever had them in the past, even just a pot of them, they could be the problem. We also have the wild garlic.
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 3, 2011
2:40 PM

Post #8404913

Thanks everyone
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

March 3, 2011
3:27 PM

Post #8405008

poison ivy, johnson grass, garlic mustard, and burdock are the worst weeds for me and the hardest to get rid of... creeping charlie I can live with if it doesn't get too out of hand, and henbit seems to die back when it gets hot. Weeds got really out of hand last year when I couldn't get out into the garden... all my "good" plants suffered in the heat & drought, but the weeds flourished!
Pewjumper
Glenwood Springs, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 3, 2011
4:19 PM

Post #8405101

Chinese Elm, (Ulmis Parvifolia) & Bindweed.

A neat trick I heard of if you have weeds in the tight quarters of established flower beds is to put on a good quality long nitrile or rubber glove and then put a cheap cotton glove over it. Dip it in Roundup and stroke your weeds ever so lovingly! Goodby!

I pull most of my weeds in the garden, but I use a hose end sprayer on the undeveloped areas when there is zero wind.

Sonny
Sunshines2day
Lubbock, TX
(Zone 7a)

March 3, 2011
5:57 PM

Post #8405319

I voted Bermudagrass but it might have been different if I didn't have a bermudagrass lawn!
kudrick
Fallston, MD
(Zone 6b)

March 4, 2011
9:14 AM

Post #8406491

My nightmare weed is Japanese Stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum), which I call "The Weed From Hell"! I first noticed it about 12 years ago, and since it looked like pretty, miniature bamboo I didn't pull it up. Now it covers almost 2 acres of my property and one of recommended methods for dealing with it is to pull it up by hand for 7 years!!!!! Or Acclaim herbicide which costs about $80 per quart and doesn't work. It is most dominant in the east, northeast, so if you see it, PULL IT UP!!!!!!!!!!
This is what it looks like:
http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/mivi1.htm
diggo1
Little Rock, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2011
10:24 AM

Post #8406621

Carolina Moonseed vine and Sugarberry or Southern Hackberry tree seedlings. We call Carolina Moonseed, "Mother Vine".
Usually comes out as "I can't stand that mother___ ___vine".

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 4, 2011
10:27 AM

Post #8406622

pewjumper... good idea for getting rid of weeds!
Another DGer posted an idea once that appeals to me also. Cut the bottom out of a plastic jug and use in tandem with a bottle of weed killer like Round Up. This insures no spray on other plants around it. The clear juice ones work best.
diggo1
Little Rock, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2011
11:46 AM

Post #8406714

Pewjumper,
I had forgotten about that little trick. We call that weed wicking down here. I used to do this on my lawn to get rid of mainly Dallisgrass, Nutgrass, Bahiagrass whatever doesn't belong. You've got to be careful on a lawn though, too much can leave a noticeable dead spot. I haven't had to do that in a few years because my bermuda grass has really come on strtong.
Thanks for the reminder.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 4, 2011
3:24 PM

Post #8406988

I use that 5 gallon plastic oil jug with the bottom cut out to Round up anything in my yard. I encapsulate only those thugs and let the jug sit until the mist has settled. Then I move to the next spot. I like the almost clear jugs so I can see what's in there.
Here's what wants space in my yard in Jax.
Spider weed
Air potato
Southern Brier
Some wild vine producing 3/4" cucumbers
Half a dozen grasses
Daisy vine
Root Beer Plant
Honeysuckle
Virginia Creeper
Whatever Jeremy plants there this summer will have to exist on what falls from the sky.

Sidney
Jubilada
Palo Alto, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 4, 2011
4:01 PM

Post #8407052

other ... bindweed (wild morning glories) and oxalis (bermuda buttercup) ...

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 4, 2011
5:19 PM

Post #8407197

Creeping charlie, crab grass and an obnoxious field horsetail which is almost impossible to kill. We got it in a load of topsoil, and it took over in weeks. I used round up. Didn't work. Tried pulling it up. It spreads by spores, roots and seeds. Didn't work. Bought two big jugs of BBQ lighter fluid and immolated it. Dang near had the fire department come to see what was burning. Didn't work.
Buried it under heavy duty landscape fabric. Still tries to come up with mums and other perennials. I picture it skulking underneath and waiting to surprise us.

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


March 5, 2011
12:59 AM

Post #8407578

English Ivy http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsAndPlants/noxious-weeds/weed-identification/english-ivy.aspx - keeps crawling through and getting tangled in everything from both neighbours yards.
hemlady
Melvindale, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 5, 2011
5:11 AM

Post #8407711

Creeping Charlie and wild violets. The wild violets are worse and don't seem to respond at all to roundup.

music2keep

music2keep
Peterstown, WV
(Zone 6a)

March 5, 2011
2:03 PM

Post #8408593

Greenbrier!
Roddee1
Port Aransas, TX

March 5, 2011
7:51 PM

Post #8409268

Guinea Grass- Zone 9b- S.TX
TLeaves
Ramona, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 5, 2011
8:54 PM

Post #8409350

Yellow Nutsedge!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 6, 2011
1:46 PM

Post #8410533


violas!! They seed down everywhere and you have to dig them up to get rid of them.
MargaretK
PERTH
Australia

March 6, 2011
9:36 PM

Post #8411208


Oxalis
mauryhillfarm
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 6, 2011
11:33 PM

Post #8411266

Quack grass, creeping buttercup, and sorrel in my garden beds. False dandelion, and dock out in the yard. Himalayan blackberry on a steep berm that cannot be mowed. Not in my yard, but choking entire trees in the area: English ivy (a terror).
Cheryl8
Monroe Township, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 7, 2011
5:25 AM

Post #8411504

Oenothera speciosa Siskiyou - Mexican Evening Primrose, Sundrops
Worst choice I ever made. They are everywhere and spread like wildfire. They even found their way into my neighbors yard.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 7, 2011
6:07 AM

Post #8411578

SheilaFW- I didn't see that anyone answered your blue flower ID- Thats corn speedwell. I have plenty, mixed with my Cardamine.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 7, 2011
7:54 AM

Post #8411770

Thank you, sallyg, I have been wondering what that is. Other weeds, cockle burr, sawbrier, silver dollar crabgrass, nutsedge, morning glory, bindweed, plaintain, winter bluegrass, (poa) careless weed, wild rose, cedar, (alternate host for cedar-apple rust), wild plum, that weed with the little round balls that stick to animal fur and get cattied everywhere, spanish needle, queen anne's lace, anything with thorns or prickles,(except roses), bremuda grass, yellow clover, etc. Luciee PS, if I think of more, I will post them, too.
Malus2006
Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 12, 2011
12:21 PM

Post #8422520

oxalis, crabgrass, quackgrass, white clover, wild raspberry and that's the short list. Tree seedlings are the worst weed for me - by the second year they're so tough to get rid of.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 12, 2011
2:24 PM

Post #8422696

I see I made a few typos in the last post. I do not usually preview. Other weeds: vetch, elm tree seedlings, mimosa, Some little something I have been pulling up all day, it has a small blue flower, hackberry, wild grape, poison ivy, honeysuckle, hurrah grass, oenothera species, oxalis, sawbriers. I realize these are not all invasive weeds, but to me, anything which invades my space is invasive. {:^) Luciee Oh yes, fencepost weeds.
estrail1rider
Melfa, VA
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2011
5:05 AM

Post #8442438

Well, after checking out my beds this spring, bittercress is certainly the plant that is all over. I don't mind it quite as much as some of the others as once I pull it out, it is gone for that year. I think if I get them out before they go to seed this year and get down some weed killer next spring, it will help.
cowlady
Webster, NY
(Zone 5a)

April 16, 2011
9:41 AM

Post #8499857

Poison Ivy! Oh how I iwsh everything else grew like it's growing! I also have wild raspberries, wild rosebush, a sumac & catalpa tree problem & some kind of tiny leaf, sticky vine that chokes out everything else. The more I pull/prune/chop the more these things grow. Any suggestions would be very welcome!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 16, 2011
9:51 AM

Post #8499877

Last fall my helper, Neri, and I hand painted every single Houttuynia leaf with Round Up and did it a few times each week. They appeared dead...wrong! They're all up and as healthy as can be. I went on a Google search to see what would kill them, and I hope the problem plants we all have, and the answer was commercial grade vinegar. It's 80% acidic and has to be cut to 20%. There are big time cautions about wearing eye, nose and hand protection. I don't even know where to find it but the article said "cleaning supply stores". If I ever find it I will use it and report back as to the effectiveness.
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 22, 2011
9:56 AM

Post #8513438

I found garlic mustard mentioned in this thread so I thought I'd post this here. I am suddenly all jazzed up about this plant I've been cussing for almost a decade.

I heard on NPR recently that this is the MOST nutritious green ever tested. It is terribly INVASIVE here. I have hated it for years. I will continue to hate it where it doesn't belong. Yet since I have learned how nutritious it is, I plan to grow it in containers where it can't escape, keep it deadheaded, and chow down! I've been needing to find a food crop that would be prolific and strong here in zone 5...

Beans and greens, baby. Beans and greens. FREE FOOD!

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


April 22, 2011
10:08 AM

Post #8513453

Here's the PlantFiles page so everyone can learn to identify it!
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2431/
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 22, 2011
10:25 AM

Post #8513478

Thanks Melody - I should have thought to put that in. And posted a picture too. I'll go get my pics.
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 22, 2011
10:38 AM

Post #8513486

Pictures from elsewhere on the internet. It was the one with the seedheads that confirmed to me I had the right weed.

Thumbnail by nilly
Click the image for an enlarged view.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 22, 2011
11:06 AM

Post #8513491

Well done nilly and melody- thanks!
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2011
9:13 AM

Post #8521534

Computer locked up on me before I could finish with the pictures - here's the one showing the seedheads:

Thumbnail by nilly
Click the image for an enlarged view.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 26, 2011
9:52 AM

Post #8521621

Good pic- shows the distinctive brassica family type seedheads.

Today I was wishing I had this thread up again- common native violets are my worst enemy right now. Tough roots, if you don''t loosen them, the base remains, and then there are zillions of seedlings there even if you DO get the bigger plant.
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2011
10:01 AM

Post #8521634

My violets are purple and I LOVE them in my lawn. I encourage them, work around them, rescue them, and spread their seeds. Gardener's Supply now sells a grass seed called "no mow" because it only gets about 5" tall. If I was youngr and healthier I'd have newspapered the whole back yard (the violets will come back through) and planted the no mow to go with the violets by now. Being old, fat and creaky, I'm trying to screw up my courage!

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


April 26, 2011
10:51 AM

Post #8521744

Violets are also edible. The flowers have more vitamin C than oranges. Just be sure that are clean so you don't get any bugs or pesticides.
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2011
10:52 AM

Post #8521746

Yeah, I've been researching edible flowers. I'll be seeding nasturtiums soon, too.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 26, 2011
12:59 PM

Post #8521979

You go, nilly!
I don't care if they're in the lawn either. Its the flower beds I am trying to rescue.
I'll eat the flowers as I weed, thx melody, less chance of going to seed
salix_man
Barberton, OH

April 26, 2011
7:51 PM

Post #8522974

I tried some garlic mustard just boiled with a little ham fat. I ate it, but I'm not wasting gas to cook any more. Can't picture it in pesto.
My absolute worst weed is Phragmites. Came in from the neighbor and has inch thick roots that can grow if even a sliver is left. This year with the flooding in back, there is no controlling it
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 29, 2011
10:10 AM

Post #8528402

Funny I was JUST picturing garlic mustard as pesto! With walnuts instead of pignoli.

Sallyg - I find the violets' leaves a nice green "filler" beteen my perennials. The only place I remove them from is my groundcover sedum area - they get large enough to hide the sedum. Thanks for the "you go!" I rarely get those I'm such a weirdo.
salix_man
Barberton, OH

April 29, 2011
10:30 AM

Post #8528429

Nilly , food.com recipes
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 29, 2011
10:45 AM

Post #8528449

Thanks
flowerqueen1960
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 30, 2011
4:14 AM

Post #8529726

Creeping Charlie. All of my neighbors have it as well. We cannot get rid of it.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 30, 2011
5:50 AM

Post #8529879

With spring really sprung, I have new worst ones! Dayflower and smartweed. I've managed to keep those to the 'back forty' where I throw extra iris chunks etc and let them all duke it out and make visiting the compost a little more fun.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2011
5:45 PM

Post #8531067

i'm not even sure what this thing is. i just moved in here and it's strategically located around the house, so i belived it was maybe a nice leafy perennial, but when i decided to pull one out and got slimed by it's gross new leaves, i gagged a little. this only pulled the leaves off. the "roots" are more like upside down tree trunks and they stink like ginseng. you know that dirty tuber smell. blah. it may not be considered "invasive" anywhere else, but i'm sure i'm in for a hell of a fight with this mysery weed. or whatever it is.

Thumbnail by OutlawHeart81
Click the image for an enlarged view.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2011
5:55 PM

Post #8531079

sumac trees, creeping charlie, and that grass that grows in a circle, are also a problem here in our yard. here's another picture of my unnamed arch nemesis though

Thumbnail by OutlawHeart81
Click the image for an enlarged view.

salix_man
Barberton, OH

April 30, 2011
6:19 PM

Post #8531123

I call it Narrow Dock. Has a nice long root. One treatment with Round Up will not do it in. Takes repeats. If the ground is really wet when the stalk is ready to bloom, I am able to pull it out, if it is a one or 2 year plant. You might try removing all leaves with a string trimmer and applying concentrate glyphosate to the root top.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 30, 2011
8:09 PM

Post #8531370

I have a lot of dock as well. I just dig it out. It does have an impressive root.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2011
8:55 PM

Post #8531427

the stalk??? _ oh dear... what is this thing? i am afraid i'll have jacks bean stalk in my yard. lol

Pirl! your creeping charlie is so cute! :)
salix_man
Barberton, OH

May 1, 2011
6:09 AM

Post #8531797

No worry about the stalk, It is 3' at most. Just don't let it seed. If you want stalks, just let Lamb's Lettuce grow. They top 8' and seeds like little dandelions.
Herman
plant_it
Valparaiso, IN

May 17, 2011
10:37 PM

Post #8570836

Garlic mustard is my enemy #1.

Here is info from Minnesota DNR website:

"Ecological Threat:
- Garlic mustard spreads into high quality woodlands upland and floodplain forests, not just into disturbed areas.
- Invaded sites undergo a decline on native herbaceous cover within 10 years.
- Garlic mustard alters habitat suitability for native insects and thereby birds and mammals.
- This European exotic occurs now in 27 midwestern and northeastern states and in Canada. "
http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/terrestrialplants/herba...

U.S. National Park Service calls garlic mustard a severe threat to native plants and animals in forest communities in much of the Eastern and Midwestern United States.

In a nutshell, it chokes out the native plants. Trouble with that is your wildlife, birds, insects have evolved since beginning of time to live on the native plants, not garlic mustard. When you wipe out the native plants, you do a good job of wiping out the native wildlife. They say garlic mustard is creating "starvation forests" for wildlife in the U.S.

Here's an article that addresses the issue with some humor: http://jackfsanders.tripod.com/garlicmustard.htm

This message was edited May 18, 2011 12:41 AM

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

May 18, 2011
5:15 AM

Post #8571042

Here's an article that addresses the issue with some hope.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/3151/
Some research finds native critters may eventually adapt.
plant_it
Valparaiso, IN

May 18, 2011
9:49 AM

Post #8571596

Good article. It does not address garlic mustard specifically, but I agree with the point of it all which is to look at each invasive species individually. Don't look at it as black and white, try to see the shades of gray. Perhaps the invasive species benefits wildlife? As in the article's example with honeysuckle. I would take it a step further and say that we also have to look at the relationship the specific plant that we are about to pull out has formed with wildlife. For me, a good example would be multiflora rose. It's overrunning my woods at a rapid rate. I cut and battle the new bushes I see coming up, but there are two huge multiflora rose bushes on my property that birds roost in every night and they use it throughout the winter. I won't take those big bushes down until I've provided them with alternative sources of cover and berries.

Also, though I don't know of any wildlife that eats garlic mustard, I saw it prove beneficial to wildlife for the first time yesterday in a strange twist of ecological fate. If you have a minute I'll share my story..I was in Chicago at what a year ago was a beautiful putt putt golf course and driving range shaded by old, beautiful cottonwood trees with squirrels running around everywhere and rabbits hopping around on the grass of the driving range. This is right off of Lake Shore Drive. I was horrified when I visited yesterday and saw that all the old cottonwoods had been chopped down, all the bushes that provided cover to the rabbits were hack-sawed and the natural grass on the range was replaced with a field of astro turf. The place looked like a hellscape. Someone new must have taken over and valued easy maintance over wildlife. I laughed when I saw that the only plant these ppl hadn't ripped out was a strand of garlic mustard in full bloom. I went to pull it out and two rabbits jumped from behind it, the garlic mustard pathetically now being their only source of cover. I let it be.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 22, 2011
7:12 PM

Post #8580615

I know some will disagree, but i have a very pretty perriwinkle problem. There is a lot of creeping Charlie, and creeping myrtle in my yard.
ireed110
Hudson, MA

June 11, 2011
6:46 AM

Post #8623652

Japanese knotweed. Hands down. I've been fighting it here for 18 years now and still pull new shoots twice a day.
salix_man
Barberton, OH

June 11, 2011
11:38 AM

Post #8624086

From this weeks Buckeye Yard and Garden Line:
WEED - JAPANESE KNOTWEED (Polygonum cuspidatum). Japanese knotweed, otherwise known as Mexican Bamboo, was introduced from eastern Asia in the late 1800s as an ornamental, but soon escaped from gardens to colonize disturbed areas. It is now widely distributed through much of the United States. Japanese knotweed is an erect, broad-leaved, semi-woody perennial that spreads by long rhizomes and occasionally by seeds. This weed can grow 3-6' in height. It prefers moist well-drained soils and is a common weed of ditches and roadsides. Strong red shoots emerge in early spring and produce dense clumps of plants with reddish or speckled stems. Small white flowers are produced from leaf axils in late summer.



Control of Japanese knotweed is difficult. Mechanical control requires constant pulling, cutting, and removal of rhizomes or stems until the remaining roots die. New plants can be produced from any remaining rhizomes so diligent removal of the entire root system is required.



Control with systemic herbicides has some success. Multiple applications are required to control this weed and application should be targeted when there is sufficient leaf surface area to pick up the herbicide. Applications after the plant blooms are sometimes more effective. As always, read and follow the label instruction and precautions when using any pesticide.

Hope this helps. A passable rhubarb pie can be made with the young stalks
ireed110
Hudson, MA

June 11, 2011
6:01 PM

Post #8624692

Thanks. Between me and my neighbor we've tried pretty much everything. At this point it's a war of attrition...I'm determined this year to pull every shoot I can find. If I can't starve it that way I'm hoping to at least dissuade it from living in the garden.

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