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Voting Booth: My favorite tomato is...

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Forum: Voting BoothReplies: 78, Views: 778
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AuthorContent
admin
Schenectady, NY


March 7, 2011
9:50 AM

Post #8412057

There are a total of 149 votes:


Brandywine (which one?)
(13 votes, 8%)
Red dot


Cherokee Purple
(19 votes, 12%)
Red dot


Big Boy
(19 votes, 12%)
Red dot


Sungold
(16 votes, 10%)
Red dot


Beefmaster
(16 votes, 10%)
Red dot


Jetstar
(4 votes, 2%)
Red dot


Rutgers
(9 votes, 6%)
Red dot


Other. (tell us!)
(53 votes, 35%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

gardenmart
Saugus, MA
(Zone 6b)

March 7, 2011
9:56 AM

Post #8412070

Sweet 100. Love those candy sweet little cherries. My outdoor garden candy when they are ripe.
Martha
patgeorge
Nurmo
Finland
(Zone 4b)

March 7, 2011
10:11 AM

Post #8412114

When I lived in England Auntie Madge's; but I can't grow them here because the growing season is too short. Sungold are lovely; but also need a longish growing season. The potato leaved varieties are generally quick growing. I grow Stupice nowadays. They're quite quick; but even so I have to finish ripening most of them in a drawer.
My least favourite is Moneymaker. They ought to put up a statue of the breeder so that we can pelt it with the balls of wet cottonwool his creation resembles so much
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 7, 2011
10:12 AM

Post #8412115

Sungold. These reliably ripen for me and are quite sweet. I have also had luck with little red cherries, likely Sweet 100, but don't recall for certain. For the past couple years I have bought different tomatoes, trying to match up the perfect fit for my microclimate. So far, I am mostly just ruling out those that don't work so well. What I'm after are five different indeterminate open pollinated cultivars so I can save seed from the best producers. Long range project.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

March 7, 2011
10:23 AM

Post #8412131

My favorites are the grape tomatoes such as Julia. Second to that I like Roma tomatoes. I don't care much for the pulp or seeds of the tomato, so at a young age I learned that Roma tomatoes were perfect for me as they have little pulp. When the wonderfully sweet grape tomatoes came on the market, they supplanted Romas as my favorites. In addition to planting Romas and grape tomatoes, I usually plant one Big Boy for those who like a larger tomato.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 7, 2011
10:39 AM

Post #8412175

Campbell's 1327.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 7, 2011
10:47 AM

Post #8412198

I love a good sweet, low acid tomato. I love Atkinson, Celebrity, Roma, and cherry types. I like to can Rutgers. I prefer tomatoes which do not have to be staked.

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

March 7, 2011
11:14 AM

Post #8412265

I like any tomatoes with hardly any seeds like Beefsteak

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

March 7, 2011
11:52 AM

Post #8412374

flowAjen,

I don't like a lot of seeds in my tomatoes either. Have you tried Roma tomatoes? They are used more for tomato sauce and paste because they have almost no seeds. I like them for the firm flesh and very little pulp or seeds. They aren't very large, however, and probably wouldn't make a great tomato sandwich.

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

March 7, 2011
12:18 PM

Post #8412442

Yep, grew one of the Roma varieties 2 years, but hubby doesn't like them so now I just get them from my neighbor ☺
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 7, 2011
12:37 PM

Post #8412515

Juliet, Big Beef, and Sungold.

beclu727

beclu727
Dacula, GA
(Zone 7b)

March 7, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8412711

Georgia Streak. Grew it last year for the first time. Beautiful and tasty.
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 7, 2011
2:20 PM

Post #8412756

I am really interested in what all of you have to say about the various tomatoes as I am a newbie at growing tomatoes. I especially want to know why a particular one is your favorite. That helps me to choose. Like those of you who said you like Romas because of their low seed, low pulp. If any of you were blindfolded and in front of you were placed, purple, yellow, red or orange tomatoes, could you tell which was which color just from the taste? Im curious about how tomatoes' tastes vary. Could someone list a really acid one and a really sweet one so I could try to taste the difference? Right now Im trying out kellogs breakfast, 4th of July, big red cherry, Black Krim and beefsteak. Dont know what to expect. Thanks for all your input.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

March 7, 2011
2:43 PM

Post #8412798

Cam,

I'm not a tomato aficionado. You will find others here w/much more knowledge on the subject. I find grape tomatoes, the red ones in particular, to be exceedingly sweet. That's what I like about them. As for Romas, as a child growing up I was extremely turned off by the gooey stuff inside a tomato, the seeds and pulp which to me at that age seemed quite gross. For that reason, I avoided eating any raw tomatoes, even though my father grew them in his garden each year. It wasn't until I tasted/saw my 1st Roma that I said, "now this is the tomato for me" because it lacked the gooey stuff. With age I've largely gotten over my aversion to tomato seeds and pulp and can now eat any variety; however, Roma and grape varieties remain my favs.

I grew the yellow plum tomatoes one year and found them to be a bit too mild in flavor for my taste. I also grew Black Krim one year. The plants didn't bare well, so I only got to taste a few. They were not my favorites, not sweet enough I think. I think probably the best way to begin to find the right tomatoes for you is to try a few different types, and note what you do and don't like. As you begin to learn which qualities you prefer, it will then become easier to choose others with those qualities. Another thing to consider if you are new at this...while heirloom varieties probably boast more flavor, I found them to be more difficult to grow because they lack the pathogen resistance bred into newer varieties. In my garden the heirloom varieties were hit hard by pests and disease as compared to the newer ones.
nifty413
Garland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2011
3:02 PM

Post #8412829

'Sungold': Incredibly sweet with subtle complex flavors. I eat most of the ripe ones before I go back inside the house, but there are still plenty to share.

For reliability, I'd pick 'Celebrity' as the best "traditional" tomato.

This message was edited Mar 7, 2011 5:05 PM
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 7, 2011
3:37 PM

Post #8412919

Cam, you might try your county agent to see what tomatoes are considered high acid. My stomach won't tolerate much acid. You might be able to google up the info. I like the Atkinson because it was bred for this area. I already knew that but Farmerdill gave me more info on the Atkinson. I like the roma because it tasts like a tomato. I've not tried the heirlooms, and I can't forsee doing so. We have a large enough garden for an old lady to manage. LOL {;^) Let us know what you find out. Luciee
cathy4
St. Louis County, MO
(Zone 5a)

March 7, 2011
4:01 PM

Post #8412973

My answer would be any tomato that is home grown and ripe, YUM!

jeri11

jeri11
Central, LA
(Zone 8b)

March 7, 2011
4:45 PM

Post #8413056

Big Boy was my vote but I also like Creole.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 7, 2011
7:05 PM

Post #8413369

I voted for Beefmaster but Martha's post corrected my thinking. It's definitely Sweet 100's, then Beefmaster, Celebrity and Big Boy. A few years ago we got an errant seedling of one of the Heirloom varieties and we adored it. Would Brandywine be close to Beefmaster in looks? That could be the one.

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 7, 2011
8:02 PM

Post #8413487

Hard to narrow it down. I voted for Cherokee Purple, but Kellog's Breakfast would be a close runner up. Black Cherry is my favorite cherry of all time. Really complex, rich flavors on all of them! Aunt Ruby's German Green is a good one, too. Tomatoes are like the Lay's potato chip ad: You can't pick just one!
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

March 7, 2011
8:03 PM

Post #8413489

Jaune Flammee. Tasty, early, and very reliable.
SsloraH
Humboldt, TN

March 7, 2011
8:43 PM

Post #8413578

Favorite tomato? Giant Belgium, but really like Burpee's roma "Big Mama", their seedless tomato, and Early Girl. We just don't have room to plant them all.

Here in West Tennessee
Yuska
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 7, 2011
8:45 PM

Post #8413584

I prefer a taste that's a bit on the sharp side rather than very sweet. Really can't narrow down to just one. Marglobe and Bonny Best are on my list but there are several others.
herbalbetty
Middleburgh, NY

March 8, 2011
3:53 AM

Post #8413814

Granny Cantrell.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

March 8, 2011
8:32 AM

Post #8414299

Sweet 100 and Early Girl...reliable beat the heat producers here.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

March 8, 2011
8:39 AM

Post #8414322

This has been a most interesting poll and one which seems to show why there are so very many varieties of tomatoes on the market. Apparently, the humble tomato offers tremendous variety and many subtle variations, and for every such minor variation there is at least one person out there for whom it's the best tomato ever.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

March 8, 2011
10:30 AM

Post #8414483

Other. I don't know 'which' one I like the most. I like sweet/tart, less seeds if possible, that will make a good sandwich, can, and freeze. Are there one or two that I can get this from? I ==LOVE, LOVE, LOVE== tomatoes.

I also like the grape/tommy-toe tomato that's sweet that I can eat while I'm outside fooling around.
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 8, 2011
12:02 PM

Post #8414623

Yuska, I think I may prefer less sweetness as well. The tomatoes I remember from my father's garden were not so sweet but had a strong tomato taste. Roma tomatoes taste too dry for my taste. I like juicy tomatoes.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


March 8, 2011
12:19 PM

Post #8414648

I voted Cherokee Purple, but I love them all. It really depends on what I'm doing with them.

Kitchen Sink Tomato Sandwich

1) A tomato big enough for a slice to cover a piece of bread.
2) A good firm-textured bread, like a multigrain.
3) Homemade mayo
4) Salt and fresh ground black pepper

Slather the bread with a thick coating of mayo...salt lightly and pepper heavily.
Add a one inch slice of tomato that completely covers the bread.
Top with another mayo-slathered piece of bread and eat standing over the kitchen sink to catch the juice drips.

Also, everyone thank steadycam3 for the Voting Booth topic...it was a fantastic idea. If anyone has a suggestion for future polls, let me know!

Kelli
L.A. (Canoga Park), CA
(Zone 10a)

March 8, 2011
2:14 PM

Post #8414882

My favorite are the tomatoes that my dad used to grow. I can't find them that good anymore. I don't know if I have changed or if tomatoes have changed or if it is my climate. Like steadycam3, I like juicy and strong but not sweet flavor.
gardenmart
Saugus, MA
(Zone 6b)

March 8, 2011
7:07 PM

Post #8415532

I have grown all types of tomatoes. Home grown ones are the best as it is like tasting sunshine when you eat a fresh picked one. I like to go to farmer's markets in the summer and buy all sorts of heirloom ones. I love these because they are beautiful sliced up on a plate to serve with dinner. Oh, the colors and patterns. I buy a lot this way because I don't have a lot of room to grow many varieties in my garden. I'm from NJ and always found their crops to be the best. I'm a Jersey Tomato,
Martha
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 8, 2011
8:23 PM

Post #8415681

Is there a tomato that has purple flesh? What is Black about tomatoes with Black in their name?

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

March 8, 2011
9:32 PM

Post #8415749

Here are a few black varieties with pictures.

http://www.tomatogrowers.com/black.htm
jmorth
Divernon, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 8, 2011
11:29 PM

Post #8415813

Celebrity

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 9, 2011
12:13 AM

Post #8415825

jen, me too on the meaty tomatos, and I did love the Cherokee Purples I had last year.
nancyruhl
Dearborn, MI

March 9, 2011
5:22 AM

Post #8415992

Black-Black cherry, black Krim-love those sweet black tomatoes
Yellow/gold-Kelloggs Breakfast, so sweet and juicy and pretty
Red/pink-Granny Cantrell but there are so many wonderful ones I wouldn't be without.
Green-Green Zebra-love the zing
Bicolor-Copia-great combo of beauty and flavor, kinda late though
Hope I didn't offend all the other wonderful tomatoes I wouldn't be without every season.
Jetstar is a good tomato, too, and I always grow it, but it doesn't qualifiy in my top 10.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 9, 2011
7:00 AM

Post #8416163

Sweet 100 and Black Krim

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 9, 2011
7:53 AM

Post #8416237

Other-roma too dry, little yellow tomatoes are less acid, but I love tomatoes, juicy, meaty, slicing tomatoes, grape tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, v8 in a pinch...
nilly
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 5b)

March 9, 2011
8:37 AM

Post #8416315

peacevine cherry.
It goes well after first frost.
jerryhildebrand
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2011
1:44 PM

Post #8416844

I like black russians
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 9, 2011
1:47 PM

Post #8416851

I struggle to get the little cherries to ripen, let along the big boys. And I get so many blackened tomatoes from early frost damage that I can't bring myself to purposely plant a black tomato. They just look wrong to me. Sounds like many of them are quite tasty though.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 9, 2011
5:28 PM

Post #8417283

My all time favorite for flavor is Paul Robeson.sp?
rntx22
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 9, 2011
6:28 PM

Post #8417396

None. I hate, hate, hate tomatoes!! EWWWW

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2011
9:29 PM

Post #8417624

*GASP*


LOL
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 10, 2011
12:44 AM

Post #8417696

Lisa, where do you get your Paul Robeson seeds?
nancyruhl
Dearborn, MI

March 10, 2011
3:04 AM

Post #8417750

Bonehead, if you are at all interested in trying a black tomato, the first large tomato to ripen for me last summer was a variety of Cherokee Purple called Indian Stripe. It ripened shortly after the first cherries.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

March 10, 2011
4:08 AM

Post #8417790

I never understood how my kids could almost drink catsup(ketchup), but wouldn't touch a tomato.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 10, 2011
9:55 AM

Post #8418329

Amen, Moonhowl!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
susybell
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 10, 2011
12:55 PM

Post #8418628

My favorite is whichever one managed to ripen a decent crop with the current year's weather issues, lol! I'm always on the lookout for reliable shorter season ones. With our cooler summers the small ones are definitely a better bet, but that doesn't keep me from experimenting every year-I think that's probably the most fun, trying something new every year.

Bonehead, have you tried Yellow Pear? That has always produced well for me-even with a bit of shade. I've tried it in several spots in my yard, variable conditions. In fact, I'm not growing it this year because, well, I'm a bit tired of it-hard to imagine, maybe, but true. It's not the strongest-flavored I've ever had and gets a bit mealy after first frost but it's reliable, reliable, reliable. One year I picked up a clearance one over the 4th of July weekend and it still grew like crazy and gave me loads of tomatoes.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 10, 2011
1:47 PM

Post #8418722

Susybell, yes I have grown Yellow Pear. I love it's bright color and shape, but for me it is mealy even before a frost. Wonder what causes that?
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 10, 2011
6:32 PM

Post #8419232

Steady- I got my seeds from Baker Creek, http://www.rareseeds.com. This is the first year I won't be growing it I got a bunch of different seeds in a trade so I didn't start it.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 10, 2011
8:58 PM

Post #8419468

Nancy, I tried Cherokee Purple a couple years ago and it cracked really bad for me. I'll look for Indian Stripe to see if it does any better. My husband is a year-round tomato guy but I only eat them when they are fresh and delicious.
susybell
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 11, 2011
3:16 AM

Post #8419639

bonehead, yeah, the yellow pear do seem to suffer flavor-wise easily. I have no idea why that is, either-just a characteristic of the plant??? I agree, they're pretty, though.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

March 11, 2011
4:40 AM

Post #8419719

I love tomatoes! I have a fav from each category; such as; salad, cherry, large slicers, canning, etc... I prefer open pollinated varieties & save the seeds. This year, I'm growing sweet 100 cherry, box car willie, rainbow, amish paste, & my gr-daughter's fav (sun sugar). I would like to grow more varieties, but my space is limited.
jerrytx
Spring, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 11, 2011
6:33 AM

Post #8419924

Juliet, Early Girl, & BetterBoy
IrisZ7
Ellicott City, MD

March 11, 2011
7:48 AM

Post #8420066

Our favorite new tomato is the Chocolate Cherry because of the abundant fruit, great color, and flavor. This is a dark, almost mahogany cherry size tomato. Each year, I give away my surplus seedlings to friends and co-workers. Chocolate Cherry got the most positive feedback.
hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 11, 2011
1:11 PM

Post #8420564

Sweet 100's in past years but I am trying Supersweet 100's this season. Also, Celebrity and Sapho.
diggo1
Little Rock, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 11, 2011
1:18 PM

Post #8420583

Azoychka for the tang. Paul Robeson for the sweet. Arkansas Traveler vs Better Boy for taste and production.

Lookie here, I brought y'all some kosher char broiled sows ear, some SLICED TOMATERS on light bread sandwiches,
so you gotta' lift and eat fast lest it fall through the crust. I brung you some RC colas, some moon pies and some after dinner
dippin' and flippin' snuff. And they fell upon the victuals and consumed them with the gusto of a hound dog.

Thank you Brother Dave Gardner. One of the great southern comedians of his time.

In his original monologue he said STEWED TOMATERS. I like 'em sliced fresh from the garden. Rejoice Dear Hearts!

Thumbnail by diggo1
Click the image for an enlarged view.

luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 11, 2011
4:02 PM

Post #8420909

Thank you for reminding those of us who are old enough to know, of Dave Gardener!! He sure has been around a long time. I think Jerry Clowers is dead, I don't know about Dave. There were some more, but I can't remember. Luciee

LazLo

LazLo
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 12, 2011
9:34 AM

Post #8422281

OTHER:

Kinda difficult to cultivate around here but my overall favourite tomato is Hungarian Heart . . . you can take a guess why.

ATBTY !       ~       ŁazŁo    ;--)

Thumbnail by LazLo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Malus2006
Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 12, 2011
12:16 PM

Post #8422507

Cherry tomatoes for me - easy to pop in mouth - they always are making lots on the vine for northern climate. They start production in June for me then last till frost.

Beefmaster - in my opinion it have a nasty habit of making fruits with a wide variety of forms and shapes. Callus - the thick brown areas and splits tend to be common with this variety in my opinion.

I had poor crop with Cherokee Purples so I wasn't too impressed with it.
bdomings
Highlands, NJ

March 12, 2011
12:56 PM

Post #8422556

Rutgers and Ramapo -- first tried last year and had beautiful full tomatoes on GIANT vines!.
Also prefer Juliettes for the smaller, grape variety.

Thumbnail by bdomings
Click the image for an enlarged view.

raisedbedbob
Walkerton, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 12, 2011
5:42 PM

Post #8423070

Favorite hybrid - Big Beef
Favorite heirloom - Radiator Charlie's Mortgage Lifter (If you can find them)
RHODRIDGEBACK
Lexington, KY
(Zone 6b)

March 13, 2011
7:05 AM

Post #8423841

I think the best cherry is sweet 100, the best paste tomato is opalka the best slicer is red brandywine, and the best strange tomato is green zebra.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

March 13, 2011
8:03 AM

Post #8423960

I like the little red currant tomatoes to eat fresh off the bush, but for preserving I like San Marzano for dehydrating and dropping in soups and stews all winter. After they're dehydrated I snip them up with kitchen scissors into just about anything Im cooking.

this year Im growing Roma because they started themselves in the compost pile. Ill have to look for opalka and there are other great ideas to try in this thread.

Here is an array of small cherry type tomatoes: http://www.tomatogrowers.com/small.htm

Sara's Galapagos is a currant tomato from seed collected on the Galopagos Islands.

This message was edited Mar 14, 2011 9:14 AM
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

March 13, 2011
10:47 AM

Post #8424285

jeri11 wrote:Big Boy was my vote but I also like Creole.

Jeri, Creole is a big hit here as well. I just planted four of those in pots on the driveway this morning. Perhaps because we are in Louisiana, we're a bit biased?! =)
smartseeds
Claremont, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 13, 2011
11:33 AM

Post #8424375

Black Krim, Black Prince, Paul Robeson. The dark tomatoes suit my palate cause they're edgy (acid). (I don't like ultra sweet corn, either). Brandywine is still my first love, but it's a challenge to grow.

With heirlooms, it's about your climate as much as your taste buds. They were developed by gardeners to suit the weather in their region, then shared with their neighbors. Sub-Arctic Plenty will fruit in 60 days (and is quite tasty), but will faint in the heat of the south. Mortgage Lifter loves that heat but would wimp out in Seattle. Pick you flavor, then find varieties that suit your climate.

The "black" tomatoes are really purple and have a deeper, richer flavor than most. Most yellows have a milder taste, not hearty enough for me, maybe perfect for you. Cherries are convenient, but rarely win taste tests. Slicers often have the richest flavor (and cover the most bread), but they take longer to ripen and the plants are huge.

Start with your climate - short-season, hot & humid, hot & dry, etc. Then pick varieties
that please your palate. There are wondrous Top Ten lists from every part of the globe.

Some key words:

"Meaty" - fewer seeds
"Paste type" - less goo, few seeds. Good for cooking, adequate for eating.
"Robust" "hearty" flavor - intensely tomatoey, not so sweet.
"Mild" - blah.
"Short-season" - will produce ripe fruit in a couple of months, quits when it gets hot.
"Determinate" ripens all at once so you can process the whole crop at once.
"Indeterminate" - ripens over the whole season so you can eat as you go.

It's smart to plant a collection for different uses:

A cherry for snacking. (easy to grow, not killer taste but dependable)
An early tomato - the first to ripen. Not necessarily the tastiest, but who cares in June?
A slicer - big, sloppy, tasty fruit. Bigger plants that usually take longer to ripen. These are the ones you remember all winter.
A paste type (Roma)- reliable, productive, not gooey, good for cooking.
A couple of classics that produce steadily all summer, don't need special attention, just put lots of food on the table. They'll keep you happy till those Brandywines finally ripen.

If you're just starting to grow tomatoes, rely on the hybrid starts at your local garden center. They're not heirlooms, but they'll succeed in your climate, aren't prone to diseases, will probably deliver while you learn the ropes. You wont be banned from DG for growing hybrids, but you can't save seed either. In the beginning, the important thing is to put food on the table without making yourself crazy. THEN discover heirlooms.

Good luck! This ain't as easy as we make it sound.



docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2011
5:10 PM

Post #8424964

Why not use seed from hybrid varieties? Does not the first year of hybred seed return about 75% true to name seedlings the first year? Would not the remaining 25% be a mix of the total genitics? My experience has found this to be aproximately true. I have found that the true hybreds returning can be identified by observation and the different seedlings culled. At three and four dollars for ten seeds we will be looking for any way to reduce the seed cost as time goes on.

The day is here and alive as I speak when one good tomato plant will put a hundred dollars on your dinner table and more if you are good at growing them. Then don't forget that carrots will grow in the same ground right under them.
hopflower
Santa Rosa, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 14, 2011
7:38 AM

Post #8426006

I love the little cherry tomatoes. So good in a salad or on their own; and so sweet.
gardenmart
Saugus, MA
(Zone 6b)

March 19, 2011
1:58 AM

Post #8435819

Part of the fun of being in the Amateur part of the Flower Show is you get to make fantastic deals on plants in some of the exhibits. MassHort Master Gardeners put together a sweet little veggie garden and a perennial border. They had many trays of replacement plants. On entry day, as I am acquainted with the Master Gardener in charge of the exhibit, I bought a pair of yellow tomato plants, some dill, cilantro and three kinds of lettuce. I am hardening them off now in my kitchen entry way. I have a chance for more when we break down. I won't have to buy so many plants this year! They couldn't store them back at the MassHort greenhouse as they have filled it up with perennial seedlings for their big sale in May. so I have given some homeless salad a good home. Right out of their containers and into mine! 10 bucks for everything.
Martha
smartseeds
Claremont, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 6, 2011
3:37 PM

Post #8476586

Docgipe - Your position on hybrids (almost) makes sense. Some hybrids are eventually stabilized so the seed produces plants similar to the parent. But so many open-pollinated varieties are now available, why risk inviting Genetic Engineering to your dinner table? And once you've spent those first dollars on heirloom seeds, you'll be able to save your own seeds forever. (Many garden center hybrids even contain a "death gene" so they won't make seeds at all. Nice!)

You can trade for a good selection of heirlooms to start with (or join Seed Savers Exchange). Save seeds from the varieties you like and you'll never need to buy seeds again. A Brandywine seed makes a Brandywine plant, period!

Heirlooms were originally passed from neighbor to neighbor, as they should be. The only reason they're even sold commercially today is because the hybrid companies pushed them out. But we're pushing back!

gardenmart
Saugus, MA
(Zone 6b)

April 14, 2011
4:35 AM

Post #8494505

Continuing to wax poetic on the subject: I love nearly all tomatoes. just something about the taste when you bite down. One of my flower show tomatoes has a flower! I think it is still too chilly outside for this flower to set any fruit, but we'll see.
Martha
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2011
10:46 AM

Post #8497786

I planted heirlooms from seed this year...for the first time. They are up and have two sets of leaves so far. This is a big experiment for me, and I'm sure if they do well, I'll be the happiest gardener in the universe.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 15, 2011
10:58 AM

Post #8497810

I'm trying three of them for the first time also. That reminds me to leave positive feedback for Remy/The Sample Seed Shop. (Just did it).
gardenmart
Saugus, MA
(Zone 6b)

April 23, 2011
6:35 AM

Post #8514990

For you searchers for the short season tomato: Silver Fir Tree This is a Russian heirloom variety. I grew it in a container from a plant one year. Fruit is a bit small, but the plant itself is beautiful as the leaves are fernlike and it looks beautiful while growing. 55-60 days.
And it was hard to tell when Green Zebra was ripe!
I will be going to the Tomatomania! event at the Massachusetts Horticultural Society plant sale in May. Besides a lecture by Scott Daigre, author of Tomatomania! How to Grow Tomatoes Successfully in Southern California, White Flower Farm will be bringing over 75 varieties of tomato plants for sale. There will be other farm vendors with fancy and heirloom varieties at this sale as well. Tomato lovers unite! May 22, 9-4, MassHort headquarters at Elm Bank at 900 Washington Street, Wellesley, MAk oh, and there will be lots of other great plants for sale on this day as well. See you there.
Martha
DougBert
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 24, 2011
12:00 PM

Post #8584568

My favorite tomatoes are red, orange, pink, yellow and sometimes green...I grow and love them all. I have 12 heirloom varieties in the back yard this year. Red Brandywine, Cherokee Purple, Green Grape, Bradley, Mortgage Lifter, Golden Nugget, Principe Borghese, Mule Team, Anna Russian, Amish Paste, German Johnson, and Jaune Flammee. I guess that's 13. I'd better get the canning jars and the dehydrator cleaned and ready for action!!!
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

May 25, 2011
10:21 AM

Post #8586534

My favorite tomato is the one in my mouth :)
hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2011
10:27 AM

Post #8586544

Amen, FlowrLady, Amen!
gardenmart
Saugus, MA
(Zone 6b)

May 29, 2011
6:02 AM

Post #8594248

Tomatomania was great. White Flower Farm brought over 7000 tomato plants in 75 varieties. I was one of several wandering volunteers who help people decide what ones to buy. They had regular varieties like earligirl, sweet 100 and San Marzano and bunches of heirloom varieties like mortgage lifter, Black Krim, and green zebra. all colors, red, yellow, black, purple, green and pink. It was fascinating to see them all. The leftover plants were donated to Mass. Hort. for a community garden project.
The gentleman they brought in to give the Tomato Talk, Scott Daigre, was excellent also. His talk was extremely informative both to veteran tomato growers and the novices alike. Lots of science mixed with tomato lore but all presented so that it could be understood by the average gardener. We had cloudy chill weather, but the tomato lovers came out in droves.
The rest of the Society Row plant sale was also a great success!
Martha

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