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Heirloom Vegetables: Remineralizing The Earth

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Forum: Heirloom VegetablesReplies: 7, Views: 185
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VGMKY
Louisville, KY

March 10, 2011
7:30 PM

Post #8419336

I came across a great read while searching for information on amending my garden soil. Thought some of you might find the article Remineralizing The Earth by Dr,. Tso-Cheng Chang The Amazing Tales of a Farmer, From Farm to Table.
Success to all and Happy Gardening!
Gary


http://remineralize.org/site/blog/magazine/dr-tso-cheng-chang-the-amazing-tale-of-a-farmer-from-farm-to-table
yehudith
silver spring, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 11, 2011
2:15 AM

Post #8419617

We have lots of granite counter top people around here, going to give it a try.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 15, 2011
8:25 AM

Post #8428266

That sounds really interesting. Thanks for posting the link. I wonder if rock dust would work on roses, too?
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 23, 2011
7:01 PM

Post #8446232

I have a lot of rocks you can have.
BLKS
San Francisco, CA

April 12, 2011
1:24 PM

Post #8490712

Fascinating. I wonder if the rock dust works by strengthening the natural resistance in plants.
normanlw5
Lancaster, MA
(Zone 5b)

May 21, 2011
8:38 AM

Post #8577481

I'm amazed that in New England, where rocks proliferate like native wildflowers, adding rock dust to the soil would make any noticeable change. I don't live all that far from Amherst, however, so I'm going to try it.
turtleheart
Wexford, PA

July 3, 2011
5:14 AM

Post #8669208

the weight of the rock in the soil is unimportant in comparison to its surface area, to be covered with water, and rooted, then the root dissolves the desired minerals with acid exuded from the root then reabsorbed. dust thereby has the best chances of being absorbed by the plant in comparison a single large rock would be blocking soil and root space, blocking water infiltration, and less than .1% of its minerals available, and when the sun hits it the majority of radiation is conducted into the soil, baking roots that desire rotting biological material for mulch that is water retentive and cool.
VGMKY
Louisville, KY

July 4, 2011
7:14 PM

Post #8672640

I am certainly pleased with the information each of you has shared. Please continue to share observations/experience when possible.
Happy Gardening to us All!
Gary

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