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Voting Booth: Do you start plants from seed indoors?

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(Zone 7a)


March 14, 2011
9:50 AM

Post #8426257

There are a total of 180 votes:


Yes, I start my annual flowers.
(39 votes, 21%)
Red dot


I always start vegetables. (what kinds?)
(69 votes, 38%)
Red dot


I would love to, but don't know how.
(2 votes, 1%)
Red dot


I've tried, but don't seem to have much luck.
(36 votes, 20%)
Red dot


I use winter sowing to start my seeds.
(12 votes, 6%)
Red dot


I don't start plants from seed. (why?)
(22 votes, 12%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

branches
Seaford, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 14, 2011
10:11 AM

Post #8426300

I usually start basil seeds indoors in late February. Everything else I winter sow.
Yuska
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 14, 2011
10:13 AM

Post #8426310

I start several vegetables, most especially tomatoes, indoors in newspaper pots. Gets them off to an early start without transplant shock.

This message was edited Mar 14, 2011 11:17 AM

beclu727

beclu727
Dacula, GA
(Zone 7b)

March 14, 2011
10:22 AM

Post #8426333

Tomatoes, Peppers and Basil this year.
Jubilada
Palo Alto, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 14, 2011
10:25 AM

Post #8426344

I start tomatoes and peppers indoors ... just put them in yesterday.

This message was edited Mar 14, 2011 9:26 AM

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

March 14, 2011
10:50 AM

Post #8426401

I have bare places in my yard so I start annuals, perennials mostly.
patgeorge
Nurmo
Finland
(Zone 4b)

March 14, 2011
10:54 AM

Post #8426410

I start veg AND annual flowers. Why am I only allowed one category?

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

March 14, 2011
10:56 AM

Post #8426421

I think because they have limited space for answers. Good thing we get to vent here! LOL
Birna_S
Reykjavik
Iceland

March 14, 2011
12:13 PM

Post #8426555

Living in Iceland we have to start most seeds indoors, in my windows now are tomato plants, sweet peppers, jalepeno peppers, melons, lemon plants, squash, cucumbers, bazil, goosberries and annual flowers.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 14, 2011
12:24 PM

Post #8426585

208 Tomatoes and 65 bell peppers, inside under fluorescent lights! No damping off...

This message was edited Mar 14, 2011 1:33 PM

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 14, 2011
12:25 PM

Post #8426586

And here we have it.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
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marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

March 14, 2011
12:29 PM

Post #8426591

Last year I started Tomatoes and Zucchini indoors, but once I mored them out side they died. This year I think I'll try buying some already started and see if I do better.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 14, 2011
1:45 PM

Post #8426729

I have been mainly hopeless in the seed starting department. I don't have a greenhouse and am not good at the hardening off business. Even when I do succeed, my puny little seedlings often just don't compare to the robust teenagers available in the nurseries, and I end up buying starts anyway. I've reconciled myself to letting the greenhouse folks do my seed starting for me. That said, I am trying winter sowing this year on a few flower seeds as an experiment, and also plan some direct sowing of easy things like dill, basil, cilantro, some annuals.

cececoogan

cececoogan
Waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 14, 2011
2:22 PM

Post #8426839

I try every year but end of losing them to damp off always.

On that note I do have to say the Hyacinth Beans and the Castor beans I started are doing great. Have most of the hyacinth bean in a container with a 6 foot trellis and they are climbing up it already. The castor beans I think I should get into individual containers real quick, but then I've been thinking that for over a week now and still have done nothing about it. I know procrastination...
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 14, 2011
2:38 PM

Post #8426869

Since I am retired, I have been starting seeds indoors.

I start broccoli, cabbage, tomatoes, peppers, watermelons, cantaloupes, cockscomb,nasturstiums, and morning glory.

palmbob

palmbob
Acton, CA
(Zone 8b)


March 14, 2011
2:49 PM

Post #8426892

If I start anything from seed, it's OUTDOORS in a large tub... if something is so sensitive it requires germinating indoors I don't want it.
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 14, 2011
3:43 PM

Post #8426987

I've tried for several years to start plants indoors, they get so big and then die. I will not do it anymore, will put seeds outdoors, and hope they will come up.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 14, 2011
4:00 PM

Post #8427007

Annual and perinneal flowers, tomatoes, odd seeds that I collect and wonder if they will grow. The rest get planted in the garden or outdoors. Luciee {;^)
flaflwrgrl
North Central , FL
(Zone 8b)

March 14, 2011
6:36 PM

Post #8427356

I answered annuals but the truth is that I start many things from seed. If I can't get it as a plant but can get the seeds I go for it! And down here there really isn't any "indoors" or "winter sowing" seed starting. I start them all outdoors. If it's going to get unusually cold them I move them up by the sliding glass door on the back porch & they won't frost or freeze there. The hardest time to start seeds here is the dead of summer. It's purely viscious here then so I will wait for the weather to cool a bit.

pixie62560

pixie62560
South China, ME
(Zone 5a)

March 14, 2011
6:37 PM

Post #8427358

Really would of liked to pick more than one button!
I winter sow , start some veggies and most annuals inside.
gansurambler
Avon, NY
(Zone 5b)

March 14, 2011
7:53 PM

Post #8427577

I voted no because it is MY WIFE who sows the seed. Not me. We've been married 46 years and she has started seeds every year. All kinds of seed: annuals, perennials, herbs, vegetables, shrubs, trees, cactus, succulents. Some are started in the greenhouse but a lot are started right here in the house under lights . When they get a little size to them they are moved out to the greenhouse.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 15, 2011
12:42 AM

Post #8427784

I've started a small variety of things indoors with some success and some failure LOL. It can be a challenge thinking ahead enough that it really works out! Like now- I better get on the tomatos this week. Luckily I started my Datura on Jan 1 - they took 4-5 weeks to sprout!
blueaussi
Columbia, SC

March 15, 2011
7:27 AM

Post #8428171

There was no way to tick more than one answer!

I start a variety of annuals, perennials, vegetables, and herbs inside. I made a seed starting rack for myself out of a 5 shelf wire shelving unit since I can't afford my own greenhouse. So far this year I have about 18 varieties of peppers, 11 of tomato, 4 kinds of basil, a mixed bag of lettuce, dill, cilantro, 3 kinds of petunias, some hollyhocks, and some foxglove growing. I'll be moving the petunias, hollyhocks, foxglove, dill and cilantro and lettuce out to the cold frame to start hardening off this weekend.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2011
9:23 AM

Post #8428351

My husband grows annuals, perennials, vegetables and herbs under lights. We plant them outside in May. I grow the basil and I grow the dahlia tubers. We've had as many as 3,000 plants growing downstairs but now we're closer to a mere 1,000.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 15, 2011
9:38 AM

Post #8428377

How many of you guy's are in the Nursery buiness?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 15, 2011
9:40 AM

Post #8428380

I'm not...just like the challenge of getting from a seed to an 8" robust, healthy seedling.

I actually find I'm enjoying starting the seeds more than growing the plants...

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 15, 2011
11:59 AM

Post #8428583

I am not--I like to have something green to care for when its still cold outside, seedlings grow fast and its nice to watch the changes,-- and the image of saving a few pennies.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2011
2:06 PM

Post #8428745

No business for us either.

I agree with Gymgirl and Sally. There's a great satisfaction in growing from seeds as well as the thought we can grow plants not available commercially.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2011
3:20 PM

Post #8428872

I'm not. I just love plants and growing things. My interests lie in this direction. Luciee
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2011
3:43 PM

Post #8428921

We all know, that the garden can be a way to save money at the supermarket each week. We also know that if we start our own plants from seed, they will cost a small fraction of the price that we would pay for "green house" plants.

Last year, I purchased a large number of seed from the "Seed Savers Exchange". In the hopes that my limited growing space would produce a bountiful supply of vegetables for at least the summer, even if I did not figure out how to properly store them for the winter.

Fortunately, even though the seed is extremely old (did not get planted last year because of the cardiac event) I am getting a good propagation rate.

Have to date only started peas but the results make me hopeful of a good harvest later in the season,

Care to all - Dyson

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

March 16, 2011
4:05 AM

Post #8429773

I voted annuals.. because that is the bulk of my seed starting but do grow veggies & WS as well

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 16, 2011
5:13 AM

Post #8429848

Dyson, be sure and at least try the older seed. Many are still good for several years! Onion and parsley are two off hand I have read are NOT good for long term, but I've had succes with most other veg seed.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 16, 2011
6:16 AM

Post #8429943

Dyson,
I participated in a whole thread on the veggie gardening forum that discussed using "old seeds." The germination rates were encouraging enough that I will never again not try, because I think a seed is too old.

I started 208 tomato seedlings in January. Approximately 75% of them were from seeds I saved in 2007-2008.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 16, 2011
6:35 AM

Post #8429988

We used to buy sample packages for a quarter from https://www.artisticgardens.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=21&osCsid=9b8d8f07a9754f5d4c113e9ecdc6c395

One package was basil and each year I'd plant two seeds. A few years ago either I did something wrong or the last two seeds failed. Gee whiz! Guess I better buy more to last me the rest of my life - scary!

Many older seeds really do work.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2011
7:15 AM

Post #8430067

Trying seedlings under lights and winter sowing both this year.

Pirl, you and the hubby are organized inside and out!

This message was edited Mar 16, 2011 8:22 AM
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 16, 2011
8:23 AM

Post #8430204

Sheila - thanks. The seeds are so much fun. The daylily seeds were the most fun and were the most beautiful but we enjoy the tomatoes most of all.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

March 16, 2011
11:18 AM

Post #8430552

I don't have the time right now to deal with starting seeds indoors. With the exception of a few things like tomatoes and peppers, most veggies can be started here by just planting seeds in the garden directly, same for many flowers. Some years I winter sow various flower seeds such as wildflowers and poppies directly on unprepared soil/grass, but I haven't done that the past few years due to knee and back problems.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 17, 2011
12:25 PM

Post #8432634

I love starting seeds indoors--it gives me something to do during the long winter months here in Wisconsin. By mid January I'm getting my seed starting setup ready. I almost always plant too early. I have impatiens blooming indoors already.

I even keep a blog with my experiences and advice on seed starting.

http://petiolejunction.wordpress.com/2011/03/04/how-to-germinate-seeds-indoors/
http://petiolejunction.wordpress.com/2011/03/04/build-an-indoor-seed-starting-setup/

Right now I have pansies, petunias, culinary herbs, a ton of coleus and impatiens and a bunch of baby hostas growing under lights.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

March 17, 2011
12:31 PM

Post #8432650

Winters here are so brief and mild and summers so taxing that when winter does come along I'm just thankful for a chance to rest and maybe get some much needed garden and yard maintenance done before we jettison into spring once more.

Impressive indoor 'garden', KaylyRed.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 17, 2011
1:13 PM

Post #8432709

Seedling coleus just do not like me

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 17, 2011
1:57 PM

Post #8432805

Nice blog Kayly. I have the wire rack but only bought the smaller two bulb lights @ $12 ea, need to buy three more for next year I think.
cathy4
St. Louis County, MO
(Zone 5a)

March 17, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8433409

A little of all of the answers, indoors, WS, in a little GH, mostly successful but sometimes I fail. Impatiens are my downfall, and I don't know why.

KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 17, 2011
8:34 PM

Post #8433575

Thanks for the compliments, DreamofSpring and Sheila. :)

I'm no expert, but I love to write so I figured I'd just share what I've done that's worked for me.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 18, 2011
8:33 AM

Post #8434300

Mostly tomatoes (54 this year) but sometimes peppers. Oh and this year I planted 6 geranium seeds and they all came up are all doing fine. So I guess I'll be doing more of that kind of thing next year or maybe this summer for Fall planting.
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 18, 2011
3:44 PM

Post #8434977

You people really amaze me by planting flowers by seed in your house's. I can get the seeds started, but can't do anything after that. Happy Gardening

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 18, 2011
7:38 PM

Post #8435526

Look on the local gardening forum for your area, I bet someone has some tips for you in your zone.
jagrogan
White Lily, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 19, 2011
8:18 AM

Post #8436229

Tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, swiss chard, watermelon, cantaloupe, and pumpkin.

I also start flower seeds indoors as I can see that they sprout. Especially biennials and flowers that don't bloom until a year after planting in hopes to get them to bloom the first year. If I plant them outdoors I forget and pull alot as weeds as I'm not one to weed everyday.
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 19, 2011
2:26 PM

Post #8436697

Today I started my spring broccoli and cabbage seeds.

Broccoli:
Emerald Crown -12
Imperial -8
Castle Dome -4
Captain -4

Cabbage:

Gonzales -4
Charmant -4
Blue Vantage -4
LostIndian
Algonac, MI

March 20, 2011
4:40 AM

Post #8437737

Today I will start my veggies according to days for maturity, such as sweet and hot peppers, 90 day tomatos, etc. The other rpoducts will start in late April / early May.
I love to plant tomatoes 'cause they are so easy and it makes me feel like a real gardener. :)
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2011
4:40 AM

Post #8437738

You didn't have a category for "everything". I like seeing shoots pop up, and I figure it gives me more control, so I start annuals indoors plus many veggies indoors. (I grow lettuce, chives and parsley in the sun room over the winter too). I have tried many perennials indoors as well but get impatient because some take so long to sprout. I've also tried winter sowing, but that doesn't seem to be as reliable as indoor sowing. The result of all that planting is usually fluorescent lights in the sun room, the basement and the garage using up kilowatts in the spring, but for the last two years I've built a temporary greenhouse on the porch with plastic sheets to lessen the electric bill.
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2011
6:18 AM

Post #8437889

Like others, I chose one category to check (annual flowers) but also mentally checked off vegetables (and herbs), perennials, and WinterSowing! To me it's all a lot of fun and I'm just so starved for something green to grow around here in February and March! I use the Parks BioDome system mostly and set up a couple of fans when the seedlings are up and running--this seems to keep the evil damping-off at bay. The only "secret" to successful seed starting inside IMHO is making a lot of light available (which can be from cheap florescent shop-lights). That's what I use in my basement, though I did purchase a more attractive lighting set-up for the sun room because DH complained about all the jury-rigged shelving and snaking extension cords to trip over! ;-)
Here's today's set-up: viola seedlings just out of the "Dome"; pansy and impatience seeds just sown under them. Coleus and rex begonia cuttings on the top left.

Thumbnail by CapeCodGardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 20, 2011
6:37 AM

Post #8437923

I have started to use the bio Domes. I just wish it didn't take so long for Park's to ship.

Are you experiencing the damping off with the bio domes? I am curious because this has not been my experience using them.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

March 20, 2011
7:27 AM

Post #8438029

Kayly, thanks for the urls. I printed them off and will be building shelves. I already have a 4x8' sheet of plywood on sawhorses with four shop lights over them as my beginning greenhouse in the garage. but I ran out of room. Your instructions provide an inexpensive way to expand my nursery.
littleacre
Caribou, ME

March 20, 2011
7:32 AM

Post #8438038

This week I will start our pumpkins & squash . Am getting antsy to get into the garden! WE have a short season ,so much to do. we are in zone 3/4

This message was edited Mar 20, 2011 10:35 AM
littleacre
Caribou, ME

March 20, 2011
7:43 AM

Post #8438061



This message was edited Mar 20, 2011 10:46 AM
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2011
8:58 AM

Post #8438202

[quote="mstella"]Kayly, thanks for the urls. I printed them off and will be building shelves. I already have a 4x8' sheet of plywood on sawhorses with four shop lights over them as my beginning greenhouse in the garage. but I ran out of room. Your instructions provide an inexpensive way to expand my nursery.[/quote]

Glad my article could help, mstella!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 20, 2011
10:38 AM

Post #8438360

I grow all my vegetables from seed, except garlic. onions, and asparagus. With garlic, I save the best looking ones and plant the largest cloves around the end of October.

I plan to grow onions from seeds this fall.
cbeardgardener
Bryant, AR
(Zone 8a)

March 20, 2011
10:50 AM

Post #8438391

I start all of my vegetables from seed. Multiple varieties of tomatoes, sweet peppers and hot peppers. I sow yellow squash, zuccinni, onions, potatoes, cucumbers, lettuce and green beans out in the garden once the soil has warmed and the danger of frost has past. Here in AR that is usually the 1st week in April. I got a 5 tiered indoor greenhouse and bought some under cabinet flourescent lights to hang on each tier and start the seeds in the peat pellets. I noticed a lot of people are having dampening off problems. Don't use potting or gardening soil. Transplant your seedlings in a mixture of perilite and Canadian peat and you shouldn't have that problem. I have been an organic gardner for about 30 yeard now. Here's a pic from last year.

Thumbnail by cbeardgardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2011
11:03 AM

Post #8438408

Beautiful garden, cbeardgardener!
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2011
1:03 PM

Post #8438591

[quote]Are you experiencing the damping off with the bio domes? I am curious because this has not been my experience using them.[/quote]
No, Texasrockgarden, sorry for my misleading comment; I have never experienced any damping off at all with the Biodomes--not while the little seedlings are still under them and not when I remove the domes after they've germinated and I'm still using the styrofoam blocks. Generally I start up a small desk fan at that time to keep the air circulating just in case. I also think that a gentle movement of air makes seedlings stockier, though I've just heard this--haven't read the science. I especially do this for my tomato seedlings grown from seed.
I agree that Park Seed takes a long time to ship; this year I just went ahead and ordered a bunch of bags of those little plugs in the Fall so I had 'em by the time I needed them.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2011
2:18 PM

Post #8438757

I did not know what was happening at Parks. I accidentally ran upon some info, don't remember where. They have had to do some restructuring because of debt. They were my favorite years ago, I got many kinds of seed from them. Now I can find just about what I want at othey on-line stores. I still have a soft spot for them, even though I don't order very much from them any more. Luciee {:^)
cathy4
St. Louis County, MO
(Zone 5a)

March 24, 2011
6:44 AM

Post #8446965

Texas, I haven't had any damping off since I started using peroxide in my water when I start plants. Here is the link to how much to use:
http://www.using-hydrogen-peroxide.com/gardening-with-hydrogen-peroxide.html

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 24, 2011
8:06 AM

Post #8447123

I have a new crop of tiny petunias and alyssum seedlings and I promise (to myself) I will not overwater them. I think I drowned my coleus by fussing and spraying them too much. I have a pan which holds eight 4 by 4 cell packs. I just put a scant quarter inch of weak compost tea in the pan and it was soaked up within a few minutes.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 24, 2011
10:32 AM

Post #8447354

Cathy, thanks for the hydrogen peroxide link! I haven't had much of a problem with damping off, but I think I'll start using that mixture just to be safe.
cathy4
St. Louis County, MO
(Zone 5a)

March 24, 2011
10:44 AM

Post #8447370

You are welcome Kayly, my success in starting from seed is nearly 100% now, I hope you have similar results.
RioGTomlin
Cayos Cochinos
Honduras
(Zone 11)

March 30, 2011
6:17 AM

Post #8460008

Living in zone 11, I start everything outside either in ground, in large tin cans, or in biodegradable egg cartons. Cilantro seeds in ground had great success, green peppers in cans, orange and papaya trees in cans, and spinach in egg cartons, all looking good so far.

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