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Central Midwest Gardening: What zone

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Forum: Central Midwest GardeningReplies: 10, Views: 96
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TriciasArbonne
Tulsa, OK
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8458512

I am in Tulsa, OK and I know I am in zone 7 but I cannot find a chart that divides a and b. What is the difference and why do the charts I google not have a & b? My zip is 74145.

Thanks.
shortleaf
suburban K.C., MO
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2011
11:15 AM

Post #8458533

Hi, welcome to DG, Tricia! Did you look for the USDA zone map? - http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/hzm-sm1.html
Will
TriciasArbonne
Tulsa, OK
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2011
11:52 AM

Post #8458587

That's actually the old one from 1990. I used http://www.arborday.org/media/Zones.cfm that I found on The Old Farmer's almanac site http://www.almanac.com/ but looking back they say that the USDA is the one most go by as of 2006 there is this:

"The Arbor Day Foundation has recently completed an extensive updating of U.S. Hardiness Zones based upon data from 5,000 National Climatic Data Center cooperative stations across the continental United States."

I guess that's when they also did away with the a & b then.
shortleaf
suburban K.C., MO
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2011
12:31 PM

Post #8458630

It's just a matter of preference, but I wouldn't use any information from a company that sells plants, (even though they say not for profit). I have noticed nurseries will put out information like zone maps to look more appealing for the sale of they're plants to everybody. Thats just me, I like Arbor Day actually. I've been to they're headquarters in Nebraska City, NE., I've stayed in they're lodge and been to they're greenhouse.
It's a neat place, worthy of a vacation visit.
Even though my zip code says this is zone 6, I consider it 5b myself. I don't set out to buy zone 6 plants, although I have a few that have done okay. I keep the receipts for sure on them!
Will
p.s. Here is they're state park! It's a neat place. Although, I was a little disappointed in the amount of non-native trees there and all around they're headquarters and properties there.

This message was edited Mar 29, 2011 2:13 PM

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shortleaf
suburban K.C., MO
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2011
6:53 PM

Post #8459328

I've been hearing good things about this inter-active zone map. - http://www.plantmaps.com/ They even want a place for it here at DG.
Enter you're zip it says! - http://www.plantmaps.com/hardiness-zone-zipcode-search-widget.php
You're also supposed to see exactly how close to the zone edges you are.
muttlover
Quincy, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 6, 2011
9:25 AM

Post #8543768

Seems I'm mostly 5b, but on one map I'm 6a. I think I'll just figure I'm "around 5b".
TriciasArbonne
Tulsa, OK
(Zone 7a)

May 6, 2011
12:37 PM

Post #8544082

Muttlover, I am native to Quincy. It is my birth city although I lived in Liberty but of course no hospital there. I spent very early years of my life in Liberty, Quincy, and Hannibal.
happgarden
Kansas City (Joyce), MO
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2011
12:48 PM

Post #8630184

Hello everyone. You should really check plant zones for hot and cold. I attended a class one time and they said Missouri had summers like Atlanta, GA and winters like Minn, MN. Which is why sometimes a plant will be rated for zone 5a and still not survive, because it can't take the heat and humdity.

Here is a link to heat zones
http://www.ahs.org/publications/heat_zone_map.htm and explains how and why they got started.

The Hardiness Zones - cold zone

There are 11 Hardiness Zones in North America. Zone 1 identifies areas in which the average annual minimum temperature falls below -50 degrees Fahrenheit. Zones 2 through 10 identify a succession of 10 degree increments above Zone 1 temperatures. For example, Zone 2 identifies areas in which the average annual minimum temperature reaches between -40 and -50 degrees Fahrenheit, while Zone 7 temperatures reach between 10 degrees and 0 degrees Fahrenheit. In Zone 11 regions, the average annual minimum temperature remains above 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Each Zone from 2 through 10 is further divided into two five-degree increments, labeled a and b, respectively. So, for example, Zone 2a identifies areas in which the average annual minimum temperature reaches between -45 and -50 degrees Fahrenheit, while Zone 2b identifies temperatures between -40 and -45 degrees Fahrenheit. This division is repeated for each Zone through 10.

This is probably more info than anyone really wanted...rofl.

pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2011
5:27 PM

Post #8630685

But it's good info!! LOL
shortleaf
suburban K.C., MO
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8630777

Yes it is, it says my heat zone is 7.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2011
7:14 PM

Post #8631007

Same here.

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