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Shady Gardens: Your woodland shade favorites

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Forum: Shady GardensReplies: 286, Views: 2,422
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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 5, 2011
10:55 AM

Post #8473743

What are some of your favorites for shady woodland areas? I have sandy loam and dry shade beneath maple trees, which can be a challenge. I posted three of my favorites for that area to my blog today: http://petiolejunction.wordpress.com/2011/04/05/shade-loving-woodland-perennials/

There are tons more that I love, and I'll be writing more on the topic in the future. Please share some of your faves and tell us where they grow best. :)

Thumbnail by KaylyRed
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bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 5, 2011
8:56 PM

Post #8475108

I can't speak to your growing conditions--it's hot, humid and heavy clay soil around here. But I LOVE the name of your blog! Toot Toot!! Janet

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 6, 2011
2:41 AM

Post #8475288

I have a corner lot with spruce trees that are 20 years old. The limbs are trimmed up to 5+ feet so I get some sun.
Soil there is clay under a 5 inch base of finely decomposed mulch.
The former owners mulched constantly ,they didnt garden much.
I have Hostas,Astilbes,Lilies, Ferns.
https://picasaweb.google.com/jgentle4/GiantHostaGarden2010
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 6, 2011
5:05 AM

Post #8475408

bariolio, thanks! I'm glad the name makes sense to anyone. ;)

And ge, how pretty! I have my hostas and astilbes in the front yard where my dogs won't stomp on them. (I have my woodland area fenced off with a short fence that the greyhounds didn't used to go over...until the shiba inu puppy showed them how.) I've had to keep the sturdier stuff in the backyard and I've moved most of the hostas (except the undulatas and other oldies that came with the house) up front.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 6, 2011
5:39 AM

Post #8475505

Ohh brother dogs.
epilogue1212
New Haven, CT
(Zone 6a)

April 7, 2011
10:45 PM

Post #8479797

My hellebores are my favorite, they flowers before anything else and they are evergreen. Some of my hellebores get less than 2 hours of sun a day, and still they thrive.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2011
2:12 AM

Post #8479896

They dont mind a little sun, They are so forgiving.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2011
5:55 AM

Post #8480126

I love hellebores, too. I wish mine would show signs of life this year so I can go out and get some photos. I really need to collect some of the double flowering varieties.
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

April 12, 2011
8:27 PM

Post #8491684

I'm rapidly becoming addicted to Hellebores. I had no idea they were such an awesome plant till I started growing some.
I planted one last year and this winter I noticed a seedling beside it. I'm surprised there isn't a separate forum for them.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 13, 2011
3:31 AM

Post #8492109

I love mine. New plant for me too.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 13, 2011
11:24 AM

Post #8492908

I have a feeling I'm going to become a hellebore collector, myself. I have a couple of no-name single varieties (one rose pink colored and one white with burgundy speckles) but I drool when I see the double ones and all the lovely colors.

I got my first bloom yesterday. The plant's not even leafed out, but already it's busy blooming. :)

Thumbnail by KaylyRed
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killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

April 13, 2011
12:12 PM

Post #8493006

Very nice!

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 13, 2011
12:17 PM

Post #8493013

I like the fact that the blooms hang on for a long time too. AND the deer that ate my heucheras in my woodland garden didn't even touch the hellebores.

Doug

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 13, 2011
12:19 PM

Post #8493014

Hellebores arent supposed to appeal to deer. They ate my Heucheras too. Never happened before.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
2:18 AM

Post #8494386

I also have never seen deer damage on my hellebores.
Here's a patch of mine from this past weekend.
My yard is 90% wooded, so woodland gardening is pretty much my thing.
Hellebores are certainly one of the reliable plants which thrive in these conditions,
despite fairly dense shade, root competition from all the surrounding trees,
and being smothered all winter with wet/frozen fallen leaves,

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
2:19 AM

Post #8494388

WOW I do love those red ones.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 14, 2011
5:57 AM

Post #8494640

weerobin, are they that dark red, or is that a trick of light? I have some that are a dark rosy pink and they look similar, but I love that dark color.Gorgeous!

I was just looking through the Klehm's catalog at some of the hellebores. I don't think I'm quite ready to spend $25 on a single plant, but...it's tempting.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
6:05 AM

Post #8494664

Check out Pine Knot $20.00 for big fancy double plants.
12 bucks for singles in 3 inch pots
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 14, 2011
6:09 AM

Post #8494672

Thanks for the tip!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
6:13 AM

Post #8494679

This is my Pineknot order.

Thumbnail by ge1836
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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 14, 2011
6:26 AM

Post #8494700

Wow, what huge plants. Very nice!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 14, 2011
7:25 AM

Post #8494805

weerobin - do you fertilize your hellebores? I haven't done any major fertilizing in a long time and my original plot of plants seem to declining ever so slightly every year. I think with all of the trees, the soil gets depleted of a lot of nutrients pretty quickly.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
8:42 AM

Post #8494961

Anyone know of a fast-spreading ground cover that would do well in full shade? The only ones I know of are slow-spreading. It's for a steep slope that's mostly clay.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
9:23 AM

Post #8495044

Creeping Jenny. Its faster than the Lamiums I have. If your planting it in a place you never intend to plant anything else.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 14, 2011
9:32 AM

Post #8495051

KyWoods--vinca minor is another fast spreader for a slope. Both vinca and creeping jenny are considered invasive by more than a few people, though. I keep them only in areas that are confined or that I actually want completely covered. A shady slope where little else grows? I say go for it.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
11:47 AM

Post #8495333

We do have creeping jenny, too, but not much is up yet this year. And I forgot about the vinca growing down by the creek! It's in bloom now, do you think it's safe to transplant some, or should I wait?
Thanks!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
11:54 AM

Post #8495347

I doubt you can do any harm to those plants. Go for it.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2011
11:58 AM

Post #8495362

Thanks, I will!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2011
3:40 AM

Post #8496947

Vinca would work great to stabilize a slope, but preferably not within the same zip code as your garden!

Cindy, I never fertilize anything. Not out of conviction, just laziness or oversight.
As for red hellebores, I planted them a long time ago, and no longer remember what type.
But they have thrived and multiplied nicely, typically retaining the same deep red color.
Here's a more modestly hued hellebore for those with less flashy taste.
I know the name of this one; it's called Party Dress.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 15, 2011
7:26 AM

Post #8497416

That 'Party Dress' is a nice one. Is it a double? As for the fertilizer, I'll try doing a little top-dressing around it with some compost or worm castings and loosen up the soil a bit. Although the soil was originally amended years ago, it tends to revert back to it's original crummy state.
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

April 15, 2011
8:00 AM

Post #8497483

I LOVE that red hellebore!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2011
8:06 AM

Post #8497492

Are those safe from deer?

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2011
8:37 AM

Post #8497571

They didn't touch mine when they devoured the heuchera.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2011
8:50 AM

Post #8497600

Deer dont like Hellebores yes.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2011
10:16 AM

Post #8497729

Great, thanks!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
4:45 AM

Post #8501267

Here are some plants in my woodland.
These are all from yesterday.
First is one of my faves, anemonella thalictroides.
This is a double pink called Shoafs Double.
It has been a reliable performer for years.
Don't be fooled though by my picture - flowers are really quite small.
But oh, so cute!

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
4:47 AM

Post #8501268

Arisaema

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
4:48 AM

Post #8501272

Leucojum is still blooming. This is Gravetye Giant.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
4:50 AM

Post #8501273

A variegated disporum sessile.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
4:55 AM

Post #8501280

Here's a tiny (just 2-3" tall) polygonatum (polygonatum humile).
I've been trying to make a groundcover from it, but as you can see, not very effectively yet...
But I think he's cute anyway.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
4:58 AM

Post #8501283

Here's a much showier polygonatum - polygonatum odoratum Doublewide.
Still just a couple years old, but appears to be quite vigorous.
I'm hoping it will look great when it expands a little.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
4:59 AM

Post #8501287

Shooting star (dodecathon).

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
5:04 AM

Post #8501291

Finally, epimediums are blooming everywhere.
So many colors, shapes, sizes. Colorful, interesting foliage, too.
Maybe my favorite woodland shade plant genus.
Don't worry, I won't launch into my epimedium pictures.
Here's just one from yesterday. I don't even know which one it is.
Record-keeping is not my strong suit.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
5:46 AM

Post #8501359

Lookin' good in St Louis! My Arisaema have just now broken thru the ground but my Solomons Seals are standing guard.

Doug

Thumbnail by postmandug
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
6:33 AM

Post #8501453

I've been waiting patiently for ten years for my variegated solomon seals to fill in.
I planted about a dozen plants about a foot apart back then.
I've still got the dozen plants. They look healthy, but they're still about a foot apart.
I keep reading how it's such an easy woodland plant.
And I see pictures like yours of a nice clump, but mine don't want to spread.
I'm suspecting they're in too deep shade, but don't know for sure.
Anyway, yours look nice.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
6:37 AM

Post #8501460

I love epimediums. Mine will get photoed in a few months.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 17, 2011
8:35 AM

Post #8501743

weerobin - More desirous plants! I have my little Anemonella species and really look forward to the small white flowers every spring. I have variegated Solomon's seal that does multiply but it travels more than I'd like so no nice grouping like you have, Doug.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 17, 2011
9:20 AM

Post #8501796

Gorgeous, weerobin and Doug! I'm still waiting for things to pop around here. It's been so stupidly cold that just when you think things are starting to get going...we're reaching daytime highs in the low 40s and freezing overnight. Into next week we have chances of rain mixed with snow. It's ugly and depressing...so it's nice to see photos that people have of actual blooms.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2011
5:58 PM

Post #8502778

My clump started out just two years ago as probably 2-3 plants in DEEP shade. The thing is they start popping before the leaves fully develop on the trees so they do get some early spring light. They are in beds behind my greenhouse/pottingshed/barn and don't even get morning sun. I also have another clump in the woodland garden that has spread in little over a year. Must be the soil??? Very acidic to begin with; lots of manure,compost and mostly natural leaf mold added later.

Doug
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 18, 2011
7:41 AM

Post #8503738

Doug - maybe the key to a good clump is the organic matter. My light conditions sound pretty similar to your's but sounds like you've amended your soil more than I have. Mine is clay that does get amended oh, every several years.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 18, 2011
8:47 AM

Post #8503893

Cindy I think it may have more to do with the acidity then we realize now that I think about it. Up on that hill where I have my woodland garden there are hundreds of native Solomons' Seals that come up every year. That soil tested 2 years ago at a ph of 4.5. That's blueberry heaven acidic!!

Doug
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 18, 2011
4:06 PM

Post #8504609

Too bad blueberries don't like shade. :) I have a lot of oaks and a few shagbark hickory. My lower garden borders on wetlands (yes, mosquito heaven) but the upper yard is all contractor imported soil (a thin layer) over clay. Have a little kit to test the soil this spring but have never had it "really" tested. I do have a few wild Solomon's seal but I think the clay is a toughie even for that.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 18, 2011
5:16 PM

Post #8504782

I did plant two blueberries up there anyway last year. Mainly for ornamental reasons.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2011
5:30 PM

Post #8504820

Very pretty fall colors on them.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 19, 2011
6:53 AM

Post #8506081

It sure would be neat if you actually got some edible berries as well.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 19, 2011
8:09 AM

Post #8506223

They did have a few on them last year, but that was right after I bought them!!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 19, 2011
4:59 PM

Post #8507260

Keep us posted on any crop you may get. Us shade people would sure be happy with growing fruit of some sort.
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
1:39 AM

Post #8536165

I had not visited this site before but did so hoping to identify a plant in a friends garden. I knew it started with an A and then on a preceding post there was the name...;Anemonella thalictrodes. Daves garden is a wonderful resource!

Thumbnail by Paul2063
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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
1:41 AM

Post #8536167

Picture #2

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
1:43 AM

Post #8536168

# 3

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
1:45 AM

Post #8536169

Here is a Trillium...I need to go me friends garden and see if it is in bloom yet.

Thumbnail by Paul2063
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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
1:48 AM

Post #8536170

Primrose in my garden

Thumbnail by Paul2063
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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
1:49 AM

Post #8536171

Primrose #2

Thumbnail by Paul2063
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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
1:50 AM

Post #8536172

nice pix
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
1:51 AM

Post #8536173

Primroses #3

Thumbnail by Paul2063
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
3:25 AM

Post #8536202

Beautiful plants, Paul.
Btw, is that a 4-leafed trillium in the right side of your trillium post?
Or an optical illusion? I've never noticed one before.
Are 4-leafed trilliums lucky?

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 3, 2011
6:07 AM

Post #8536475

Those Anemonella thalictrodes are so sweet! I also planted some primrose in my shade garden and am happy to report that not only have they not died yet, they rebloomed a little bit since the first big bloom when I bought them. I am almost positive they will not survive the heat of a Houston summer but I couldn't pass up the vivid colors! I'm a sucker for vivid colors... :) Happy digging! Janet
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
6:47 AM

Post #8536552

Primroses are not always reliably perennial here but they are not expensive in the spring so I always buy a few. Their cheery colors are so tempting. Some make it to the second year, others don't, but they are worth it.

Thumbnail by Paul2063
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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
6:49 AM

Post #8536557

#2

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

May 3, 2011
6:50 AM

Post #8536559

#3

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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2011
7:04 AM

Post #8536603

Primroses are never perennial for me--those are very nice, Paul!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

May 3, 2011
8:36 AM

Post #8536809

Love those colorful Primulas! Not hardy for me though. I do have a type of Primula vulgaris though whose yellow flowers are always very cheerful in the early spring.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
10:22 AM

Post #8536973

Hi, Paul, and welcome to Dave's! Thanks for sharing your beautiful blooms with us. I want to try primroses this year. I never had them before, and there are so many colors to choose from!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8537898

OK, so finally I got out to check out what's happening between rain showers, tornadoes, etc. Lo and behold, I found the relentless progression of spring. Here's what I found in my woodland this past weekend.

We'll start w/ a pretty yellow-flowering japanese perennial, hylomecon japonica.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:05 PM

Post #8537904

This is an asian version of forget-me-not, myositis rupicola.
Also a spring bloomer. A very petite plant, so you can't hide it in the back.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:06 PM

Post #8537908

This one is a big-bold azalea, Komo Kulshan.
One of my favorites. Really brightens up the woodland.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:08 PM

Post #8537910

Next, a lady slipper. This is it's third year blooming in a row.
This year, sent up a second stem. I hope that means it's settling in.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:09 PM

Post #8537912

Here are some primroses. Valuable for some bright color in the shade.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:10 PM

Post #8537914

This asarum is a great woodland ground cover. Spreads slowly, steadily. I love it.
Asarum takaoi.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:13 PM

Post #8537916

This trillium definitely needs a bath.
It's nodding trillium, trillium catesbei.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:15 PM

Post #8537917

A big (10+ ft) viburnum, viburnum sargentii Onandaga.
Supposedly doesn't like humidity, but does fine here.
Just starting to bloom. A nice structural element for shady garden.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:17 PM

Post #8537925

This is an iris which tolerates the light shade of an open woodland.
This is iris cristata Abbey's Violet.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:18 PM

Post #8537929

Finally, another shrub which gives structure to my open woodland.
Enkianthus campanulatus. Full bloom right now.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:22 PM

Post #8537937

Oops, last one. Really, I promise.
This is a cute perennial called melittis melissophyllum Royal Velvet Distinction.
Very striking colors for shade. Again, full bloom right now.

Thanks for enduring my photo journey through my woodland garden!

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 3, 2011
6:31 PM

Post #8537962

No such thing as 'enduring'. They are all so beautiful. I just bought the Melittis through a nursery on Saturday! Same one.

That viburnum is stunning as is the Enkianthus. Any fragrance for either of them?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
6:59 PM

Post #8538051

No scent that I could detect, but it's been so cold and drippy;
not the climate conducive to sumptuous fragrance.
Supposed to be in the 30's tonight again, for god sake.
It's May, at least by the calendar.
Of course, before you know it, we'll be in the humid 90's.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2011
7:31 PM

Post #8538167

Great photos, Weerobin! I love the ladyslipper.

I've actually never seen Enkianthus campanulatus--it's beautiful!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2011
8:08 PM

Post #8538277

Love them all, Weerobin, thanks for posting them!
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

May 3, 2011
9:39 PM

Post #8538536

I ditto everyone else. Beautiful!

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 4, 2011
2:37 PM

Post #8539798

That is one of the most beautiful azaleas I've ever seen. Thanks for sharing your wonderland with us! Janet
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

May 4, 2011
3:56 PM

Post #8539962

weerobin - what's your secret with the Enkianthus? I've had one for several years now - it's about 5 ft tall - but only one lonely group of flowers (raceme?) in all that time. I'm getting very tempted to move it, thinking it doesn't get enough sun. Have only fed it once or twice over the years. Would appreciate any tips.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2011
5:46 PM

Post #8540221

Cindy, I'd hate to show all the failed attempts at growing enkianthus.
All I can tell you with confidence is they need sharp drainage.
And they can't stand our full summer sun. Mine are fairly shaded.
I have 3 that are doing well now; I'd be embarassed to say how many I've killed.
This is one of the other ones which is doing OK, a cultivar called Kisoji no haru.
It's supposed to be dark red, but to my eye, it's just slightly redder than the species.
Oh, well...

The two I'm really trying to get established are enkianthus perulatus (petite plant w/ pure white flowers) and enkianthus cernuus rubens w/ deep pure red flowers. I have one of each which are still 'alive' after 4-5 years, but that's about all I can say for them. Maybe one of these days they'll decide to start growing. I see no sign of it yet...

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bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 5, 2011
6:38 AM

Post #8541096

Since this is another gorgeous flower, I looked up Enkianthus on DG. The ones that had growing info all say they like very acid to acid soil. I've never seen a plant "liking" very acid soil! Mildly acid, yes. Anyway, maybe you could try acidifying the soil, if not done already. Here's a link I found with a bit of info on that: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1054644. Good luck and keep those pretty flower pics coming! Janet
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

May 5, 2011
2:17 PM

Post #8541999

Thanks for the advice! I do know that it has sharp drainage (maybe too dry?) and I might just have to get my soil tested but in the land of oak trees and acorns, I'm hoping that it's acid enough. I did check on it this morning (I have the species E. campanulatus - no named variety) and I'm seeing at least 15 groups of flower buds. Yippee! That'll be the most flowers I've ever seen on it and I've had it since '97. Weerobin, your varieties sound delightful! Even though I haven't killed this one (yet), I don't know if I'd be confident enough to try some of the other varieties.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2011
6:19 AM

Post #8592382

my absolute favorite shade plants are my ligularias! By far. Ronna

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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2011
6:21 AM

Post #8592385

of course I have all kinds of favorites! I always tols the kids oh, those are my favorites! they would always laugh.

This message was edited May 28, 2011 8:22 AM

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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2011
6:23 AM

Post #8592387

huecheras, many.

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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2011
6:26 AM

Post #8592393

goats beards and oakleaf hydrangea

This message was edited May 28, 2011 8:27 AM

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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2011
6:29 AM

Post #8592395

honey belles

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 28, 2011
6:41 AM

Post #8592418

I love ligularias too. So do the sluggs but what a dramatic leaf.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 28, 2011
8:46 AM

Post #8592621

Ligularias don't seem to like me. I thought it was because I'm lazy about watering...but the astilbes seem to do fine. *shrug* I agree, they are dramatic. I've seen them put in a great show in other people's gardens.

Great shots, gardenlady!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 28, 2011
10:31 AM

Post #8592753

This album contains borders in shade. Woodpile is nearly all shaded annuals due to traffic all winter.
https://picasaweb.google.com/jgentle4/JustBordersMaybeAFewBlooms

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2011
5:07 AM

Post #8594163

beautiful ge1836! I love peeking into people gardens as I go for a walk. People do it here all the time! Love it. I just got back from a walk there are some beautiful gardens here in Plainwell! Love looking. Wish I could just walk right on in a take a closer look. I would not care if people did it here at all. Very foggy this morning. Have a great day.

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 29, 2011
5:11 AM

Post #8594167

Very nice scene

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2011
5:13 AM

Post #8594176

thanks it looks really full. But it is a low view. Should take one of the pathway it looks much nicer!
FrostyNYC
Long Island
United States

June 5, 2011
8:19 AM

Post #8610323

I never understood the fascination with hellebores. Now watch me fall for them and collection 20 next year.

Favorite shade overall: Hostas! (Wolverine, June, Bressingham blue, Blue mouse ears... love them)
Runner up: Heucheras (Berry smoothie, Green spice, and Midnight rose being my favorites right now)
Favorite shade ground cover: Ajuga 'burgundy glow' -- you can walk on this stuff, it's purple, and it blooms with bright blue flowers in the spring.
Favorite shade fern: Japanese painted fern. Once established, this plant can take major abuse.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2011
8:33 AM

Post #8610358

Nice selection.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2011
9:11 AM

Post #8610437

Here's my Ligularia Othello, taken last summer.
It's not blooming yet for me this year.
I think it blooms late - August, if I'm remembering correctly.

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2011
9:55 AM

Post #8610522

Love ligularias. I have either Desdemona or Britt Marie,cant remember. Leaves are dark.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2011
3:05 PM

Post #8611099

Frankly, I'm taking a stab at calling mine Othello. I think that's what it is, but not sure...
I have a couple others with more distinctly purple underleaves.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2011
5:14 PM

Post #8611363

I have othello, fasinations (sp), lil rocket, roceet, britt marie, dark beauty and the one that has the long name that starts with a P. Does anyone else have that one? I really am struggling with where to place it in my yard. Am not to impressed with it so far. Comes back evey year but... Looking pretty bad. How much shade can it take? Can not put it where I have all the rest of mu ligularias. I am confused!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
1:50 PM

Post #8655965

I have a planting of dwarf hostas which are filling in nicely.
They are right outside our kitchen window,
so their small size doesn't get lost in the jungle of the rest of the yard.
I've given up on buying large hostas, since they're just deer food.
So I'm loading up on the dwarf guys and snuggle them up
right next to the house where the deer rarely tread.
I love the variety of foliage shape/coloration.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
1:59 PM

Post #8655982

Here's a nice ligularia with huge bold dissected foliage, ligularia japonica.
I really like to choose plants with great foliage,
since period of actual bloom is often so short.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8655986

The hidden hostas are great. What is the spikie one?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
2:08 PM

Post #8656005

The golden ones? Called 'Dragon Tails'. Spreads into a spreading clump quickly.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
2:13 PM

Post #8656017

Very special.
I am waiting for Nana to open its blooms,maybe tomorrow.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
2:28 PM

Post #8656042

I think the dwarf hostas are adorable.
Each one is cuter than the last, so I inevitably buy too many.
So I have found another way to keep them close enough to enjoy,
while protected from the deer. I just pot up the extras and put them on a cart.
It sits on a shady part of the driveway where the deer wouldn't think to brouse.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
2:57 PM

Post #8656092

Did I say I have a hard time saying 'no' to a dwarf hosta?
Here are more of my 'overflow'.
Others may have flowers on their front porch; we have hostas!

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
3:00 PM

Post #8656110

I also love asarums in my shady yard.
Here is a chinese asarum (asarum splendens) in front of a hydrangea.
It's a fairly big clump, as you can see.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
3:04 PM

Post #8656124

Here's a rather accidentally nice foliage combo: a dwarf hosta Pandora's Box,
next to asarum takaoi (one of my fave's) and a ferny dicentra.
Who needs flowers?

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2011
6:23 PM

Post #8656482

Dang you Wee, I knew I should have stopped by for a tour when we came through SL back in May!!!!

Doug
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

June 26, 2011
7:42 PM

Post #8656670

OK, Wee - I'm guessing your plant list is running close to 400? Always love your inspiring photos. I'm just starting to appreciate (via the wallet) dwarf Hosta. I have a trio near the patio - 'Kabitan', 'Chartreuse Wiggles' and 'Frosted Mouse Ears'. I think I like keeping them close to the house or they'll get buried by other plants out in the bigger beds. I'm wondering if they'd survive over winter in tufa containers. Hmm...
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

June 26, 2011
7:49 PM

Post #8656679

Here in zone 5 Utah I have my Mouse Ears in the ground and they came through well last winter which was a hard winter. A friend has a large Blue Mouse Ears that has been in a container for several years. Here are my Mouse Ears

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

June 26, 2011
7:53 PM

Post #8656686

This Blue Mouse Ears has been in this container for several years.

This message was edited Jun 27, 2011 10:11 AM

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 27, 2011
4:00 AM

Post #8657041

Cindy - I totally agree about Wee's vast collection of beautiful shade plants. Inspiring.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

June 27, 2011
8:28 AM

Post #8657499

Paul - nice grouping. I'm getting tempted to try a container with some of the little Hostas. I do have 'Krossa Regal' in a pot with "Hak" grass for about 3 years now but it's a big pot. I'm just wondering if the small Hostas in smaller containers would survive as well.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 27, 2011
1:42 PM

Post #8658022

One question? Does Blue Mouse Ears bloom?
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

June 27, 2011
1:50 PM

Post #8658035

Yes...if you look closely at the picture above you will see bloom stalks. One of mine in the garden this year didn't start to grow when the others did but sent up an odd looking little growth but no leaves. When I looked at it closely I recognized it as a small bloom stalk. I cut it off and the plant immediately started to send to leaves.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 27, 2011
2:09 PM

Post #8658074

Where is the best place to get the minis?
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

June 27, 2011
2:09 PM

Post #8658076

Not only does it bloom, but 'Blue Mouse Ears' is incredibly cute when it's blooming. :)

I don't have any pics of my own, but here's one Google found: http://www.tgreenhouses.com/FCKeditor/uploads/hosta_blue_mouse_ears.jpg
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2011
2:56 PM

Post #8658177

KyWoods, I think ebay is a great place to buy hosta. You can buy starter or larger plants. I've never been disappointed with purchases from ebay.

http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=hosta+blue+mouse+ears&_sacat=See-All-Categories
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 27, 2011
5:26 PM

Post #8658424

Gardenlady, sure Mouse Ears blooms!

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 27, 2011
5:34 PM

Post #8658436

Cindy, I've been a little afraid of trying to overwinter a dwarf hosta outdoors in a small container. I've always brought mine in. I have some dwarf hostas in a large container which have done fine.

Doug, next time you pass thru, you're welcome to visit. I appreciate your and Cindy & Pirl's comments, though we're all just doing the same thing. Just doing what we enjoy. I will never have as polished or beautiful a garden as most I see posted. I enjoy trying lots of unusual plant material. Many don't work out, of course. Those that do, end up on Dave's. I love seeing everyone else's version of 'works in progress'.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 27, 2011
5:49 PM

Post #8658470

And from all your successes we get to view the photos and select what we'd like for our own garden - can it get any better than that? Thanks so much, Weerobin.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
1:15 AM

Post #8659170

Mouse Ears is sweet.
I am waiting for daylight and see if Nana has opened its blooms.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

June 28, 2011
7:14 AM

Post #8659644

Wee - thanks for your input on winter vs. dwarf Hostas. If you have reservations in your zone, it sounds like small containers outdoors over winter are definitely not prudent here. The only time I've ever had a Hosta indoors is when I got my very small baby 'Kabitan' that just could not thrive on it's own in the garden. I did keep it indoors in a sunny window over the winter to let it grow a bit several years ago and it's now happy in the garden and ready to divide. And I do appreciate your philosophy and am glad that you share your successes. Keeps me motivated.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
7:39 AM

Post #8659703

'works in progress' is the ultimate understatement! I've been working on an 'Asian Garden' up on the hill across the path from the woodland garden. It's not an ideal location but when you live on a slope you have to go with what nature gave you! Couple of pics:

Doug

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postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
7:44 AM

Post #8659713

Pic of my pride and joy at the moment. Bought one of those $2.50 Junipers last year at Lowes and pruned it to look like a bonsai. Also bought the pot at Lowes and cut the bottom out of it. Buried the pot and planted the juniper in it. Since the pot was a terra cotta colored plastic I think it works well in the situation.

Doug

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postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
7:45 AM

Post #8659714

And finally, I moved Buddha from another bed to oversee everything.

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
9:06 AM

Post #8659870

Wow, Doug, your place is gorgeous! Since I live in the woods, I would love to get your input on how to keep the critters from eating, digging up, and otherwise wreaking havoc in the garden. Spraying stinky stuff is impractical with all the rain we've had. The giant pinwheel I put up in the coneflower bed did nothing to stop something from biting the heads off half the coneflowers just as they were about to bloom!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
10:46 AM

Post #8660042

WOW doug is right.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

June 28, 2011
11:29 AM

Post #8660102

Doug - I love how you work with the existing topography! Have you put together any "before" and "after" pics? You had some beautiful beds being developed last year.
Deer love coneflowers! And columbine. And especially Hostas but usually the softer-leaved ones. They tend to leave the heavy, corrugated leaved Hostas alone if there are other goodies to eat. They'll even nip the tips of roses as well and they love Astilbe flowers. The only thing that's worked for me is putting up mesh fencing (the cheap way) and studying the possible access points. I still can't keep them from walking into the backyard off the street. Here, it's usually very early morning foraging.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

June 28, 2011
12:13 PM

Post #8660176

Doug, your garden is looking lovely! And I adore the Buddha--he looks so joyous. :)

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
6:48 PM

Post #8660990

Kinda like me, fat and happy!

Doug
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
7:02 PM

Post #8661039

Wow, Doug, I'm glad to see how haven't been wasting your time this spring.
I also love that Buddha. And your Juniper looks great!!

Like Ky, I'm also interested in how you protect your guys from the deer. I've pretty much given up. I think fencing is the only answer, but my property has a long road-front, so I can't imagine fencing the frontage. So I just cuss them out. And what about erosion control on your slope? My garden is basically a wooded hillside also, so I struggle trying to find a ground cover to hold the soil without letting loose the proverbial garden thug that would overwhelm everyone including the Great Buddha himself!

And how about last year's project?? Are you going to share some follow up pix?
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

June 28, 2011
7:07 PM

Post #8661049

Trillium in a friends garden last May

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

June 28, 2011
7:09 PM

Post #8661060

Another trillium in May

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

June 28, 2011
7:12 PM

Post #8661070

Epimedium foliage

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

June 28, 2011
7:14 PM

Post #8661078

Epimedium blooms

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

June 28, 2011
7:15 PM

Post #8661086

Hosta Liberty

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2011
7:35 PM

Post #8661144

Beautiful, Paul! I didn't know there were yellow trilliums.
Our property is also a wooded hillside, choked with japanese honeysuckle.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 29, 2011
1:31 AM

Post #8661484

I love epimediums.Mine are out of bloom now.
Beautiful yellows Paul
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 29, 2011
3:17 AM

Post #8661509

Ky, I spent the better part of two summers clearing away all the choking honeysuckle from my wooded hillside yard.
It's 2 acres. I pulled by the roots those that I could, others I just cut to the ground.
The stumps resprout avidly, but if you keep snapping off the sprouts it will eventually give up the ghost.
I've been able to keep the yard pretty clear of the stuff ever since, though I'm constantly pulling seedlings.
But what I didn't realize was that all the native wildflowers being choked by the honeysuckle jungle are still laying dormant, waiting for an opportunity to spring to life.
Here is a picture of wild phlox in the cleared area the very next summer.
I didn't plant any of it!
There are also native trilliums, mayapples, bloodroot, geraneums, jack-in-the-pulpit, solomon seal...

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

June 29, 2011
5:54 AM

Post #8661681

Very pretty, Weerobin!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

June 29, 2011
8:41 AM

Post #8661946

Love the yellow Trillium! And the wild geranium is so pretty.
Would you believe that 20+ years ago, I purposely planted Hall's honeysuckle? On my back 45 degree slope, I was searching for something for cover to retard erosion. Never did flower well as a groundcover but occasionally a runner will make it up the fence where it does have a pretty yellow and white flower. Now it's mixed in with Vinca minor so it's doubtful I'll ever get rid of it unless I undertake a month-long project (not!). Seems like it'd be more of a challenge than getting rid of my Campanula rapunculoides.
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

June 29, 2011
9:07 AM

Post #8661983

Cindy, did you finally eliminate the Campanula? I've heard it is impossible to get rid of.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 29, 2011
9:58 AM

Post #8662072

There are over 25 acres of honeysuckle on just our side of the hill. I have managed to clear small areas, and make trails through the rest, lol. We need a team of gardeners/landscapers to live here, but that's for rich folk, sigh...

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 29, 2011
11:52 AM

Post #8662269

The deer aren't usually a big problem for me. I used to see a lot of them crossing over the hill but the last few years we have seen them less. (Until last year during the drought when they found out that I watered my woodland garden and things stayed green and fresh - instant Bambi salad bar..) I have never had a runoff problem either. I guess because it had a lot of poison ivy and virginia creeper before I started the garden it kinda helped hold the soil in place. I still mulch mostly with chopped leaves and pine needles so that mimics mother nature's leaf mold mulch. I'll try to get up there next week and shoot a few photos and post. I'm still weeding after being gone three weeks in April and May, plus working on the Asian Garden, a fern bog below that and transplanting some natives I don't think it will ever be done! It really is a joy to do though. I'd MUCH rather be up there on the hill than sitting in front of a TV

Doug

CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

June 29, 2011
4:32 PM

Post #8662765

NO - the Campanula still lives and flowers. Grrr! Haven't made a serious attempt (another in a long series) on it yet this year. Have been pulling the flowering stalks before they open up though.
Your comment about the PI on the hillside - same thing here although I didn't know what PI looked like (especially the roots pulled during a January thaw) until after cortisone shot and antihistamines. Ugh! People at work treated me like a leper - especially a pregnant co-worker who thought I had the measles.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 29, 2011
5:55 PM

Post #8662903

Oh, nooo, you poor thing!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2011
2:00 AM

Post #8663478

Ohhh gawd I cant imagine dealing with PI and VC to make a garden.
Big rewards for hanging in there.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2011
3:44 AM

Post #8663519

Ky, 25 acres... yikes! I thought it was a colossal achievement to clear my 2!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 30, 2011
4:16 AM

Post #8663538

When I read about the 25 acres of honeysuckle, the PI and VC, along with the Campanula I thought I should shut up and thank God I don't have those issues.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2011
5:39 AM

Post #8663652

I leave most of the creeper as it is a pretty vine and very common to our woods anyway.

Doug
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

June 30, 2011
7:40 AM

Post #8663830

25 acres to take care of is daunting. Hats off to you, Doug.
I think DD is more challenged than I. Lives on top of a ridge in rural TN, well sunk in a shallow aquifer, battling bermuda grass and rocks, hauling water from her rain barrels, either too wet or too dry, long stretches of 90+ degree days - all to grow some pesticide-free veggies. Now that's determination.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2011
11:10 AM

Post #8664275

I don't think I can live long enough to clear all 25 acres, but it's good exercise and keeps me busy, lol. It is pretty, smells nice, and feeds the birds, but like they say, too much of a good thing...
I also like the virginia creeper vines. We have some growing up the side of the house, which has cedar siding. Do you think that's okay, or should we pull it off? It's just a small area right now.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 30, 2011
4:14 PM

Post #8664886

Oh I am so excited about my blue mouse ears now!!! You are correct they are so cute.!!! BTW these are NOT Blue Mouse Ears! lol

This message was edited Jun 30, 2011 6:15 PM

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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

June 30, 2011
8:13 PM

Post #8665344

My 'Blue Mouse Ears' has buds. I'll try to remember to take a shot when it blooms. One can never have too many pictures of BME. It is an adorable little hosta.
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

July 1, 2011
4:38 PM

Post #8666866

Krossa Regal and Arunucus

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 2, 2011
6:10 AM

Post #8667584

Hi Paul. Nice contrast. Which aruncus is that? I like it's scale.
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

July 2, 2011
7:47 AM

Post #8667766

Unfortunately I've had the aruncus for many years, didn't keep a name, don,t remember where I got it. I've seen a number of pictures but they never look exactly like mine. Perhaps some om this forum with more knowledge will know.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 2, 2011
9:06 AM

Post #8667892

Beautiful! It reminds me of fireworks!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 3, 2011
1:36 AM

Post #8669090

Here is hosta Nana blooming.I found it in the daylilies this spring and planted it in a container.Its much happier there.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 8, 2011
1:59 PM

Post #8680645

Pirl got me interested in trying annual caladiums for color in the shady woodland.
They love our heat and humidity, apparently.
What she didn't tell me is that the deer apparently don't care for them!
I'm astonished. They look good enough to eat to me!

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 8, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8680647

For comparson, check out the hostas about 10ft away...
Bambi's favorite!!

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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 8, 2011
2:25 PM

Post #8680702

An all you can eat salad bar! The bad thing about the remaining stems is that you get to stare at them for the rest of the season. Been there.
Love the Caladium in the landscape. I had planned on trying that as well but my order got "lost" and bulbs didn't come until late June. Maybe once they sprout, I can slip them into the ground.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2011
3:01 PM

Post #8680774

Cindy - plant them and they'll grow. I kept some in packages for too long but they were planted before June 4th and they are thriving now.

So happy it worked well for you, Weerobin. The deer did nibble on mine last year but only those in the front, not in the back. Your hostas look pitiful, as you know. Would you consider a large piece of the ugly green plastic coated fencing to place on top of the hostas so the deer can't get to them?

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 8, 2011
5:01 PM

Post #8680988

Somebody ate my caladiums one year, but not the hostas! Bunnies, maybe.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2011
5:06 PM

Post #8681000

We have rabbits around here but they don't touch the caladium. They love lilies but I do use Blood Meal to keep them away.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 8, 2011
5:13 PM

Post #8681015

Hmm, if that works, I'll try it. Thanks!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2011
5:17 PM

Post #8681032

Organic and not expensive. Just keep applying it to new growth that the rabbits are more prone to eating.
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

July 8, 2011
7:20 PM

Post #8681235

pirl, do you ever end up overfertilizing with BM?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2011
7:28 PM

Post #8681257

No. I go around sprinkling like it's fairy dust making sure I get the new growth and also put it on the grass leading to the lilies the rabbits prefer. Even the grass doesn't grow any better than the untreated grass.
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

July 8, 2011
8:35 PM

Post #8681347

Good to know. :-) My rabbits like creeping phlox, winecups, blue fescue and probably others I can't think of right now. Grrrrrrrrrr...
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
4:17 AM

Post #8681554

Clover and lily leaves top their choices here. The red fox tops off his list with rabbits

Wish the fox liked deer.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 9, 2011
4:58 AM

Post #8681597

Oh, Pirl, if you could take a glimpse at my yard, you'd see that I don't shy away from protective barriers.
My wife complains that our yard looks more like an armed fortress than a garden.
I've got hardware cloth cages for the small plants, bigger gauge wire cages in a variety of sizes for larger guys,
then of course there's the heavy duty plasting trunk protectors
to keep the deer antler rubbing from girdling my young trees.
But you can't cover everything! The hostas above are close enough to the house,
the deer haven't bothered them in the past. I guess the deer are getting friendlier!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
6:20 AM

Post #8681670

Either we have an armed fortress garden or very few plants. It's a miserable choice but each deer eats eight pounds a day so we have no choice. They do eat the hosta flowers and spikes that grow through the squares in the green fencing.

The last thing we need is friendlier deer! Should we invite them over for venison stew?
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

July 9, 2011
6:46 AM

Post #8681713

I have felt bad because we have deer in the yard during the winter and last year they stayed long enough to eat the young buds off the roses but they've never bothered my hosta. Must be discouraging!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 9, 2011
6:56 AM

Post #8681743

I've battled the deer ever since we moved to our current home. My first attempt at a barrier across the 150 ft of my back property line consisted of a grid of "invisible" rope strung between trees. Then came the green snow fencing which turned brittle and broke up over the years. Last year my brother installed a woven mesh fencing for me. It's 6 ft tall and is attached to metal posts. My back property line is very rough and uneven, bordering a wooded wetlands so setting posts in concrete for a conventional chain link fence was going to be a lot of work. He just had to hammer these posts into the ground. And because he's a hunter, he knew the weakest points in my defense system. So far, the new setup seems to be working better than my previous attempts. Now if it would only keep the raccoons out...
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
7:15 AM

Post #8681780

We do have our battles and yet we don't give up. That's a mighty testament to our love of gardening.

While I hate the look of the deer mesh we had to put up to the 10' height around the vegetable garden, it does keep the deer out. It appears invisible here due to the time of day the photo was taken (1 PM) but it shows up in photos of the lilies on the opposite side.

We have gone OT so let's get back on track with shady gardening. Sorry!

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 9, 2011
8:19 AM

Post #8681892

Nice garden setup you have there, pirl!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
8:47 AM

Post #8681929

Thanks. Jack's pride is the vegetable garden but I do the mulching.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 9, 2011
2:31 PM

Post #8682464

Wow! Looks like you spent a lot of time setting up the veg garden and getting it right, Pirl!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
2:38 PM

Post #8682471

It's really all Jack's work, not mine. Thanks, though. I'll be sure to tell him.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 9, 2011
2:52 PM

Post #8682481

As Pirl reminds us, back to the topic.
Here's one of the mainstays of my shady yard - bottlebruch buckeye.
In full bloom today.
It's hard taking a satisfactory picture, but you get the point.

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
3:04 PM

Post #8682500

Lovely. Your hardscaping is wonderful.

Here's a lily that enjoys the shade - Purple Prince (hardly "purple" but a sales pitch instead)...

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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 9, 2011
3:04 PM

Post #8682501

That is nice!
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

July 9, 2011
3:09 PM

Post #8682510

I love Brunnera 'Jack Frost'

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

July 9, 2011
3:11 PM

Post #8682518

Hosta, of course

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

July 9, 2011
3:15 PM

Post #8682522

Hosta Krossa Regal and Aruncus

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Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

July 9, 2011
3:17 PM

Post #8682526

Aruncus, Dicentra, and hosta Antioch

This message was edited Jul 9, 2011 4:18 PM

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 9, 2011
4:35 PM

Post #8682651

What a wonderful assortment of plants!
Do you just let the dicentra die back on it's own when it goes dormant, or do you cut down the yellowing foliage?
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

July 9, 2011
4:52 PM

Post #8682676

I love Bottlebrush Buckeye also. Mine is in mostly shade and I have another in a pot I plan to put in mostly sun. It blooms for such a long time. Seems like mine has been blooming for weeks now. Nice fragrance too.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 10, 2011
1:28 AM

Post #8683179

Here is my Woodpile garden.It gets too much winter traffic for perennials.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 10, 2011
7:32 AM

Post #8683582

Paul, I again am lusting over your aruncus.
I have the taller (dioicus) and the shorter (aesthifolius).
But yours looks like one of the newer in-between cultivars.
I'll definitely be adding a couple to my yard next year.
Thanks for posting them.

My brunnera's are pretty much done for this year.
Foliage is getting pretty ratty.
Such a pretty plant in the spring/early summer.
But it doesn't age very gracefully in late summer/autumn.
Paul2063
Pleasant Grove, UT

July 10, 2011
8:27 AM

Post #8683675

My aruncus is possibly 20 years old. Don't even remember where I got it. I ought to take some divisions and put them in other places in the garden. I seem to recall reading once that if after bloom you cut brunnera way back they will send up some nice large fresh foliage. Might be worth a try.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 10, 2011
5:34 PM

Post #8684722

It's worth a try, since otherwise I know my brunnera will just look worse and worse til end of year.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2011
6:07 PM

Post #8684778

This thread prompted me to check up on my Brunnera today and it's doing fine. I didn't cut it back (ever) and it still looks so good to me.

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 11, 2011
1:11 AM

Post #8685238

The part shade area where Jack Frost is,becomes more sunny as the season goes on. Mine look best in spring up til June.

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2011
3:25 AM

Post #8685274

Yours is lush! Mine is pretty but puny. Maybe it wants more sun.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 11, 2011
3:59 AM

Post #8685302

Mine gets bright shade until after 3 oclock then sun.

Looking Glass was moved to an area that got more sun and nearly died. I have it inthe woods.
It really cant deal with much sun. LG is a sport of Javk Frost but needs seem to be different.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2011
5:11 AM

Post #8695384

This is a fountain in a shade garden which includes this JM Spring Delight

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2011
9:41 AM

Post #8695800

Oh, that looks so pretty and peaceful!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
2:41 AM

Post #8698841

This is an anemonopsis.
It isn't supposed to like our heat and humidity.
So of course, the day it blooms, it's 100 degrees here...
I suspect he's not very happy.
Flowers nod, so it's hard to get a good picture.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
2:43 AM

Post #8698844

This is a flowering shrub called adina rubella.
It has beautiful glossy foliage, so it's pretty even when it's not blooming.
The blooms are these great Sputnik-like globes.

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
2:45 AM

Post #8698846

last pix is exotic
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
2:51 AM

Post #8698849

And I love my hakonechloa. It thrives in about 1/2 shade.
The All Gold variety is a more robust grower for me than Aureola.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
2:54 AM

Post #8698850

GE, I agree. I like it's unusual character.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
2:58 AM

Post #8698854

Here are some of the caladiums I got this year from Bill at Pirl's suggestion.
I live on a shady slope, and this is a shot of the caladiums from below.
I think they look cool with the backlit sun.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
3:02 AM

Post #8698857

Now that I see the posted picture, you can see why my wife thinks our yard is more like a fortress than a garden. I didn't realize the cage to protect against bunnies and the fencing around my saplings to protect against the deer would by highlighted so prominently!

Edited to correct spelling!

This message was edited Jul 18, 2011 7:52 AM

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
3:05 AM

Post #8698860

LOL
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
3:05 AM

Post #8698861

This is pinellia Polly Spout

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
3:07 AM

Post #8698862

It has very curious Jack-in-the-pulpit-like flowers.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
3:11 AM

Post #8698864

Another shade-tolerant grass is carex siderosticha variegata.
It has coarser texture than hakonechloa.

This message was edited Jul 18, 2011 4:12 AM

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
3:14 AM

Post #8698866

Finally, this is a variegated deutzia.
Makes a pretty plant all summer, even when not in bloom.
Deutzia gracilis variegata

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 18, 2011
5:03 AM

Post #8698970

Beautiful photos and plants, Weerobin. That Deutzia is so lovely but they all are. Glad the caladiums worked out well for you. I love caladiums from Bill though they got a late start with our cool spring. Now they're strutting their stuff.

Many of my photos are ruined by our "fortress" look, too, Scott!

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bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 18, 2011
5:24 AM

Post #8699010

Weerobin, you have such an incredible variety of plants. Did you plant all of them or are some native and were growing on the property when you moved there?
I'm really loving all the shade plant varieties I'm seeing on this thread. I have one that came up and I have no idea what it is? Any guesses?

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
7:00 AM

Post #8699178

Almost looks like my brugmansia leaves, but I can't imagine that's right. Plant ID isn't my strong suit. Post it on the Plant ID forum; they'll likely know the answer.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
7:38 AM

Post #8699259

Wee, how old is your stand of All Gold? I never had luck with macra so I just bought some all gold a month or so ago for the Asian Garden area.

Doug
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

July 18, 2011
11:50 AM

Post #8699808

[quote="Weerobin"]This is a flowering shrub called adina rubella.
It has beautiful glossy foliage, so it's pretty even when it's not blooming.
The blooms are these great Sputnik-like globes.[/quote]

Why have I never heard of this plant? I love it. I checked the PFs. Great pics of it there. Gonna have to get me one of 'em. :-p
Thanks, Wee.

CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 18, 2011
12:32 PM

Post #8699886

Love the variegated Deutzia and might have to add that to my "want" list. Funny about the "Hak" grass - my 'Aureola' is more robust than 'All Gold'. Great to see that your plants are holding up with all of the heat, Wee.
killdawabbit
Christiana, TN
(Zone 6b)

July 18, 2011
1:34 PM

Post #8699977

[quote="Weerobin"]This is pinellia Polly Spout[/quote]

Wee, is that Virginia Creeper and Ampelopsis I see in the pic? If so, it makes me feel a little better that I'm not the only one who has to pull these relentlessly. Your garden is so beautiful.

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 18, 2011
2:17 PM

Post #8700053

Ok. I think I've ID'd my mystery plant. It's probably a 4 o'clock and I'll need to move it fast!

That variegated deutzia is beautiful. And the Purple Prince, Pirl.

Just planted these two Pachystachys lutea. There is a small, back yard nursery in the Heights area of Houston that sells less common tropical plants. Picked up a few fun ones to try out...





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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
2:50 PM

Post #8700113

Kilda, I can't even imagine that there's a weed loose somewhere in my yard!! I was sure I had pulled them all last weekend! And the weekend before, etc., etc.,

Whoever invented those nasty vine weeds anyway?? My mid-summer gardening chore is what I call plant rescue; rescuing them from the relentless weeds!

Doug, I'll bet that stand of hakonechloa is about 5yrs old.
For whatever reason, it loves that spot. I would think it would look great in your asian garden. Likes some moisture, though.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2011
3:30 AM

Post #8701109

Bariolio, most of the plants I've posted are ones I've acquired, generally mail order,
since my tastes tend toward the obscure, which aren't likely to be at Lowe's. I like trying things out that I've never heard of. Some of them turn out nicely (and end up on Dave's), the rest are a bust. But I enjoy the process.

I do have a lot of natives. When I moved here 15yrs ago, my wooded lot was choked with non-native, invasive eurasian honeysuckle. Once I cleared out all the honeysuckle, I discovered lots of dormant native woodland wildflowers, including phlox, trillium, bloodroot, mayapple, celandine poppy, bluebells.

Here are a couple more shade-tolerant grass-like plants which I like.
This is a golden liriope (Peedee Ingot) with dwarf mondo (ophiopogon jap. nana).
I think their contrasting textures as well as colors is a nice combo.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2011
3:33 AM

Post #8701111

And of course hydrangeas just getting started around here.

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2011
3:58 AM

Post #8701124

That's a nice liriope, Wee, and I love the dwarf mondo. I've never seen a mondo with that texture.

It reminds me a bit of euphorbia 'Fen's Ruby', which loves the shade and doesn't grow out of bounds. It's shown here with caladium, 'Gypsy Rose'.

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2011
6:32 AM

Post #8701315

So that's where the honeysuckle came from...we moved here from Kansas City, KS...the honeysuckle there musta stowed away in our luggage! Our woods are choked with it, and yes, the small areas I've cleared have bloomed with pretty wildflowers.

This message was edited Jul 19, 2011 12:03 PM
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 19, 2011
7:45 AM

Post #8701437

Hi,
I have been enjoying this thread for quite a while, but haven't posted any pics (until now). What's so great is I have a mostly shady back yard and while many of the plants I'm seeing here are familiar to me, many I've never heard of or have never seen the particular ones listed.

I also tend to experiment with plants that shouldn't work in so little sun, sometimes with super results!

I HAVE to get some of the beautiful, colorful flowers many of you have posted!!

I noticed that some of you mentioned that your Brunnera 'Jack Frost' gets ratty after early Summer. I just planted one plant last Spring that I ordered from Bluestone as an experiment.

This picture was taken just this morning, and other than the fact that some insect did a little nibbling this Spring, I think they look pretty good. BTW, we've had temps in the low 90's the last week with very high humidity.

Edited to say: I love how it brightens the bed way in the back of my yard.

This message was edited Jul 19, 2011 9:48 AM

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2011
8:41 AM

Post #8701562

Yours is beautiful. Mine likes the 90% shade as well and never turned ratty.

I agree with you that many of the plants shown here I had never even heard of or read about but it's nice to see the great photos and get ideas for the future.

The hydrangeas really keep their colors so well in the shade.

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 19, 2011
9:50 AM

Post #8701688

Thanks pirl - I love your Hydrangea. . . It's BEAUTIFUL!! What variety is it?

This is my very first ever Hydrangea bloom. I planted two very small "Cityline" Hydrangeas last Spring. This one is called 'Venice' and it grows between 1' - 3' tall. Right now it's only about 9" tall. I really like the color.

You can see that some of the leaves have a little yellowing. This is a small bed we created last Spring out of an area of the lawn that that was mostly clay & tends to retain a lot of water. We heavily ammended it with Cotton Burr compost, leaves, etc, but it will be a work-in-progress to get it right.

The other one is called 'Berlin' and I will probably have to move it since it sits where all the water collects and isn't growing as well.

This pic was taken during a time of day when it gets filtered sun.

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2011
10:05 AM

Post #8701710

Thank you. It's Harlequin and quite often there are several differently colored heads on it at the same time.

Yours is a lovely shade of pink. I was given Berlin and possibly Cityline but they arrived as we were packing for vacation so I just gave them to my physical therapist.

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 19, 2011
1:19 PM

Post #8702082

Now that I've actually had one bloom, I can hardly wait to try more varieties. Your Harlequin sounds wonderfully unique.

"Cityline" is a whole series of compact Hydrangea. They're German hybrids and have names like Berlin, Venice, Paris, Vienna, Rio and Mars (not sure where that last one came from).
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2011
1:25 PM

Post #8702088

They bloom when only nine inches tall? Ooo, another one to put on my list of must-haves!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2011
3:03 PM

Post #8702237

I just saw Mars today (the hydrangea) and loved it. They were bred for short stature, which is good compared to the giants out there.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2011
3:06 PM

Post #8702241

My hydrangeas have been pretty puny this year; I'm not sure why.
Those hydrangeas are really pretty.

Welcome to the 'dark side' (AKA the shady forum), Nuts.
I think you'll find lots of types of hydrangeas that have evolving colors as the blooms age. Its one of the features I like best about them.
Be sure to post pix of those blooms!

I really like the fine texture of that euphorbia, Pirl.
I've been leary of euphorbias in general, since I've had some try to outrun me in the past. But if this one is more polite, maybe I'll give him a try.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2011
3:16 PM

Post #8702271

Very well behaved, Wee.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 20, 2011
9:47 AM

Post #8703755

weerobin - How do you control your Carex s. 'Variegata'? Mine seemed to be quite the spreader and was tougher than others to pull up the unwanted sprouts.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2011
3:33 AM

Post #8705477

Oops! I haven't controlled it at all. I thought it was spreading nicely only because of my outstanding gardening skills!! I didn't know it was an aggressive spreader. It's about 3-4 ft diameter presently. Is it enough of a nightmare for you that I should remove it? I've got plenty of other misbehaving plants; I don't need another problem child.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 21, 2011
3:42 AM

Post #8705481

Could it be potted up to control it?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2011
3:50 AM

Post #8705485

Come to think of it, I've had prior experience with a shade-tolerant grass which grew too rampantly. Imperata Red Baron looked really pretty the first couple years in one of my shady areas. But I have spent considerable time since then trying to rein it in. Here is a shot of it a few years ago when it was an innocent babe. (You'll notice of course the ubiquitous cages for varmint protection for a couple lovelies hidden from view).

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 21, 2011
3:57 AM

Post #8705494

Very pretty grass and that Brunnera is so lush and gorgeous.

I've resorted to potting a lot of plants to keep them contained.

Thought of you and the fortresses for your plants, Wee, as I passed Conca d'Or lilies...

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 21, 2011
7:04 AM

Post #8705729

Love your Brunnera! I agree with pirl, it is very lush.

Does your 'Imperata Red' spread by underground runners? I wonder if you could do something like is generally done with Mint . . .submerge a bottomless pot that's deep enough to prevent the roots from spreading?
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 21, 2011
7:57 AM

Post #8705815

I ended up pulling out my Carex and moving it to a more "wild" spot. I had it in a couple of different spots, initially loving the bold (for a grass) leaf texture and variegation. In my garden, the root mass would get pretty dense and tough and was really resistant to tugging the stray runners. Not as tough to remove as northern sea oats but definitely tougher than C. 'Ice Dance'. If it sneakily invades other plants, it becomes a real challenge. Additionally, the foliage looked pretty ratty by the end of the season. 'Ice Dance' runs but it's easier to control.
Pirl has a great suggestion about potting some of the thugs. Remember that grass called Phalaris arundinacea 'Variegata' offered years ago for shade? Terribly notorious for being invasive but silly me - I liked the variegation at a time when there was very little available for shade gardeners. Kept it in pots for years and the pots actually had the bottoms intact which I think is a little more critical when trying to control some of the aggressives. I do love the combo of the 'Red Baron' with the Brunnera.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
3:38 AM

Post #8707968

I have kept a brethren of carex siderosticha variegata in a pot, where it looks nice.
This one is carex sid. Island Brocade. I think it's prettier, which is why I have it in a pot.
It also likes partial shade. Gets scorched in full sun, at least for me.
I have it in the yard also, where it hasn't been aggressive for me at all.
In fact, I wish it spread a little faster.
But who knows, it might be location, exposure, soil, etc, etc.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
3:44 AM

Post #8707971

Very nice in the pot.
Heres what doing on my turfAstilbe Pumilla

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
3:45 AM

Post #8707972

astilbe liliput

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
3:45 AM

Post #8707973

late blooming might be astilbe purple lance

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
3:47 AM

Post #8707976

I have another area with Red Baron as backdrop to a japanese white pine.
I think it looks nice in the fall. Here's a picture from last fall.
In this picture, the hakonechloa to the left of the picture is looking pretty ragged,
but Red Baron still looks nice.

(Hey! Who put that flag in the middle of my picture??)!!

Pirl, I just may have to put up fencing - I just love those lilies!
I still plant hostas, despite the deer, because they look nice for spring/early summer,
before the deer find them.
But I gave up on lilies, because they NEVER get to blooming height before being mowed down. But I'm not sure I have the energy to put up fencing...

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
3:49 AM

Post #8707982

nice colors
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
3:54 AM

Post #8707987

Hi, GE. It's nice having some astilbes still going strong.
Now that I see your astilbe pumila, looks a little like one I have.
A friend gave me what he simply called 'groundcover astilbe'.
It's blooming now. I wonder if it's pumila?
The foliage can't be seen well in this post, but it lays fairly flat to the ground.
The flowers are maybe 8-10".

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2011
3:57 AM

Post #8707991

That Carex in the pot does look good. Why is it the plants we wish would spread just remain content as they are while others run rampant? Your red tipped grass looks great in autumn!

My flags are pink!

Jo Ann - not Purple Lance but Pumila. Hey, it started with a P. Purple Lance is tall - as in about 3.5'.

Check out the escapees that the deer haven't found yet:

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2011
3:59 AM

Post #8707992

That is Pumila, Wee.

Here's both Pumila and Purple Lance.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
4:00 AM

Post #8707993

Those lilies look pretty tasty to me!!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
4:01 AM

Post #8707994

Wow, a very pretty cluster of astilbes, especially mid-July!
Very nice.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2011
4:05 AM

Post #8707998

Thanks, Wee. Those astilbe are in shade. The ones that grow in sun are a nice toasty brown now.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
4:15 AM

Post #8708006

Yup! mine are from Pirl
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2011
4:23 AM

Post #8708015

Astilbes still retain such pretty foliage once the brown flowers are removed. Phlox David is in bloom now but when it's deadheaded it's just not thrilling foliage.

Remember to water those astilbe in this heat or they'll go dormant in a flash, Jo Ann.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
4:45 AM

Post #8708035

yup
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 22, 2011
7:08 AM

Post #8708252

Wee - re: fencing for your lilies - have you considered a temporary net fence? That's assuming your lilies are all in the same area. Once the metal posts are in the ground, it's easy enough to hang the netting. And you could put it up or take it down depending on the stage of your lilies. The black deer netting isn't so bad but I've opted for the green woven mesh "temporary" pet netting to keep them out of my garden. It stays up year round.
Liking the 'Island Brocade'. Kinda reminds me of young bamboo.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2011
7:26 AM

Post #8708276

I'd love to see a photo of the fencing you mentioned, Cindy. Thanks.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2011
7:34 AM

Post #8708287

Does any of you shade gardeners have any "Sister Theresa" Astilbe. I am thinking of ordering just to fill in my shady back garden. My sister name is Theresa and I tought it would be nice to have a few .
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2011
7:44 AM

Post #8708307

I don't. Where did you see it, Etelka?
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2011
7:53 AM

Post #8708319

I found it in few websites, American Medows, Santa Rosa gardens, but right now it is our of stock, hopefully in fall it will be back. It is a nice pale peachy pink and fluffy flowers. My garden yesterday was a crispy mess, I had to water it tree times around before it got to normal level. It is very hot and I can't skipp watering one day.
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 22, 2011
7:57 AM

Post #8708322

Gorgeous pics, everyone! I love Astilbes, especially. I think I need more!

I know I've said this over-and-over, but I swear by "Liquid Fence". We have deer year-'round, though we don't often see them during the Summer, because they usually just come at night. Starting in Autumn they also come during the day.

We love the deer as much as all the other critters & birds we see and wouldn't want them to stop coming, so it's a bit of a compromise. I don't want fences everywhere so I use Liquid Fence.

I used to buy it by the gallon, but this year I bought the quart-size concentrate which makes 4 gallons (shop around, though. Prices vary. I never buy from nurseries - way overpriced. In my area places like Farm & Fleet, Menards and Meijers have the best prices). The concentrate will probably last me at least through next Summer (I store it in the basement in a sealed plastic bag to keep it from freezing in winter).

You don't need to spray it constantly. They recommend once-a-week for three weeks to "train" the deer (or rabbits, chipmunks, or?) then once-a-month. I tend to spray additionally if we've had several really hard rains, or when there is a lot of new growth on their favorite plants. It is non-toxic . . .won't hurt the critters even if they decide to take a bite . . .smells for a day, then fades, but the critters will still smell it.

The only downside is it sometimes makes the leaves look a little "dull" for a while if you spray too heavily, but for me it's better than looking through fences or staring at plants that have had their blooms or leaves "chomped" off. For me it's a "Win-Win" situation.

There . . .I can get down off my soapbox now!
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 22, 2011
8:00 AM

Post #8708329

IT'S POURING HERE . . .YAY!!!!!!!!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2011
8:02 AM

Post #8708331

We used Liquid Fence last year. When they were absent for the last six weeks we felt they went back to their own area - what a mistake. The very idea of spraying while the heat index was at 99 before 10 AM is just not possible. By the time we can spray the deer will still be in their learning phase and the daylilies will be gone in three weeks.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2011
8:02 AM

Post #8708333

Well I'm downright jealous! I'd love a rainy day instead of this heat.
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 22, 2011
8:18 AM

Post #8708366

pirl - The rain might be headed your way (fingers crossed).

You know, after the very first time you spray Liquid Fence the deer won't touch the plants. You don't have to wait three weeks. If it cools down enough to be outside at night, it might be worth trying to spray a few areas.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
8:36 AM

Post #8708406

I hope nobody minds me starting a new thread--this one has been so popular, it got really long.



Next thread:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1198921/

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2011
8:47 AM

Post #8708425

thanks K the thread also moves slower than molasses.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 30, 2012
9:38 AM

Post #8988052

bariolio, I have very acid soil. Some plants do indeed like it, especially the rhododendron and mountain Laurel. But there are many others and lots and lots of trees, including the dogwood. The hydrangeas are always very blue, somethimes even a little purple. Blackberries and raspberries thrive, both the wild ones and the cultivated ones..
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 30, 2012
3:28 PM

Post #8988490

That sounds like our soil--I should plant some hydrangeas, as I never had them. I love the blue ones!


OOPS!! I just realized that we are posting on the old thread, lol.
We are here now, and anxiously awaiting spring:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1198921/#new

This message was edited Jan 30, 2012 6:38 PM
moxies_garden
Batesburg, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 23, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #9017286

[quote="KyWoods"]So that's where the honeysuckle came from...we moved here from Kansas City, KS...the honeysuckle there musta stowed away in our luggage! Our woods are choked with it, and yes, the small areas I've cleared have bloomed with pretty wildflowers.

This message was edited Jul 19, 2011 12:03 PM[/quote]


Hello fellow Kansas Citian! I am from Westport/Plaza area myself. I moved to SC back in 08'.

KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9017509

Hi, moxiesgarden! I'll bet you're enjoying that warmer southern air!
Please join us on the newest thread:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1198921/#new

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 29, 2012
4:39 PM

Post #9025087

Someone here mentioned lilies in this thread. What lilies tolerate shade? How much shade?
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 29, 2012
4:53 PM

Post #9025104

We're over here now, woodspirit, hope to see you there:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1198921/#new

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http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1198921/#new

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