Sinkers or floaters?

Troy, NY(Zone 5b)

Since it is passover this week I was just wondering which matza balls do you prefer? I make floaters but my husband likes sinkers. His grandma made sinkers but my MIL is a floater like me.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Absolutely floaters! Grandma made floaters, Mom made floaters and I learned to make floaters from her. On the other hand, MIL made cannon balls (she actually was flattered when we called them that). lol My FIL and the three boys loved them. Thankfully my boy came over to the floater side. Chag sameach!
Laurel

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Castlewood, SD

ok ~ what is a matza ball? like a dumpling in soup?
sorry I just really had to ask 8-)
thanks

Troy, NY(Zone 5b)

A matza ball is like a dumpling, usually in chiken soup. I keep mine really simple so if you want to give them a try next time you make chicken soup go for it:

beat 4 eggs in a bowl.
add 4 tablespoons chicken fat (or oil)
1-2 tsp salt (depends on taste)
1/4 tsp pepper
1/4 cup seltzer
wisk together
than add 1 cup matza meal.

mix to combine and then refrigerate at least 2 hours

mold into 2 inch balls and drop into chicken soup. Simmer 15-20 minutes and enjoy.

(every family has a little variation. I use seltzer some use chicken broth etc. you can add parsley or garlic powder but I go for simple)

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Mine float, too. I like them very light and tender. I have a Jewish cookbook called "Love and Knishes," and the author tells a story about trying to make her matzoh balls the way her mother-in-law did, to please her husband. She made many attempts and could never duplicate the taste he remembered, until one day the top fell off the matzoh meal box and too much poured into the bowl. She decided to make up the matzoh balls anyway, and cooked and served them even though they were rock hard. Her husband was ecstatic: she had finally recreated his mother's dish!

I guess it depends what you were brought up with!

Castlewood, SD

i will have to give it a try, thank you very much for the recipe.
I'm not sure what you mean by seltzer and can you find the matza meal by the flour in a grocery store?
sorry for all the extra questions.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Matzo(a) meal is ground matzo crackers. Although it can be used at any time of year it is used mostly during the eight days of Passover observance because many Jewish people follow dietary restrictions including abstaining from certain grains. These include, but are not limited to wheat, barely, oats rye, spelt and others not prepared under rabbinic supervision. Some do not eat beans, rice or corn during this time either. Leavening (yeast, baking soda and baking powder) cannot be used, though seltzer and eggs can, and the grains must be harvested, stored, ground and cooked in special ways and with strict time limits to avoid natural fermentation.

You can find matzo meal on the ethnic aisle or kosher section, along with other Jewish foods, in larger cities. It may be difficult if you do not have a Jewish community nearby. Some Christian communities now have church seders during the
Easter season to experience the text of the last supper. If there is matzo in your stores for this you can put it through your food processor until it is finely ground and use it to make matzo meal.

Castlewood, SD

ok thank you

Troy, NY(Zone 5b)

Seltzer is just soda water with bubbles.. It is in the soda aisle but make sure you get plain not flavored. I sent DH and he bought lemon......had to make another trip to the store

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Hmmm, I have never used seltzer in mine!

Castlewood, SD

thank you, I will make sure I pick it up myself... that sounds like something my DH would do too ;-)

Columbus, OH

Floaters. Vegetarian floaters :) I made matza for the first time last week, sooo worth it.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Okay, I thought mine were floaters and they do float when the soup is simmering, but then they sink. But they were very light and fluffy. So are they floaters or sinkers?

Columbus, OH

Probably floaters...it's all about texture. Sinkers are more dense and chewy, floaters are softer and lighter.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

They are floaters. They all sink once the water is turned off, never to float again.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Aha, thank you! I am now eligible to be inducted into the Floaters Hall of Fame!

Last night I made leg of lamb using a French recipe that called for a coating of chopped garlic, rosemary, Dijon mustard, honey and breadcrumbs. It was really good and very easy. We also had matzo kugel, last year's spring peas, and gefilte fish for first, before the soup. Any suggestions for leftover charoses?

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

We eat it with cheese and matzo. It's especially good with stinky cheese or extra sharp cheddar. I have served it as a side relish with lamb and fish. I but lemon or orange juice and zest, apples, various dried fruits, cranberries or raisins, nuts, matzo meal, kosher wine and sometimes orange liquor.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Cheese and matzo, huh? Interesting! I guess I could also serve it with the leftover lamb.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

We eat matzo year around. A good brand is the same, to me, as Carr's water wafers. I break it up like lavash and serve it to guests in the "off season". Besides, we are passadich for the entire holiday and eat no other breads or crackers.

As for the leftover charoset, you can jazz it up by adding chopped jalapenos or other hot peppers and cilantro for a sweet and hot salsa. It's especially good with mild fish or grilled meat such as flank steak.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I used to buy matzo crackers when my son was small because he was allergic to a lot of things and they had very few ingredients, but other than that we don't use matzo except at Passover. When I was a kid I used to like it spread with a little chicken schmaltz and a sprinkle of salt...

Hemet, CA(Zone 9b)

Here's a new idea

My former mother in law would add some Matza meal to the mixture for scrambled eggs. It's a wonderful addition, makes the eggs more like a pancake. Try it, it's so good.

Sylvia

Troy, NY(Zone 5b)

Matza brei! My husband loves it. Oh and he always reminds me MY MOTHER makes the best chopped liver...................are you sure this is her recipe?

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I've made matzo meal pancakes, matzo granola with honey, sesame seeds, nuts and dried fruit. matzo pizza (if you pile on the toppings call it matzo picchu), matzo lasagna, matzo brei, matzo French toast casserole, matzo in chopped liver and under chopped liver, with pickled herring and onions both in and out of sour cream and gravlax. I've made and had every imaginable topping and spread for matzo. There's been 488 days of Passover in my lifetime. That's lotzo matzo!

Troy, NY(Zone 5b)

I love the matzo picchu idea

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Gotta get creative when the kids start saying, "Oh, matzo AGAIN? When is Passover over?"

Troy, NY(Zone 5b)

Mine have been know to bring Entenmann’s chocolate chip cookies to a seder.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Doubtful my kids would do that. The younger two went to Jewish schools with kosher kitchens. Our neighborhood public school has an IB program with Hebrew as a second language option. Nu? I've had guests, including Jewish ones bring Entenmans for seder. They are well intended but I don't even have hametz in the kitchen during Passover. The refrigerator and main floor pantries are cleaned out and everything brought downstairs for storage. We used to do the tradition of dusting the shelves with a feather and the children searching for hametz. Though I don't keep a kosher kitchen we enjoy observing traditions during Passover. We are passing on to our children what our families passed on to us. This includes tales of sinkers and floaters past.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Nice to hear your stories, Laurel! Obviously we don't go anywhere near the distance you do; my mother never did either. But it's an important part of our backgrounds!

Troy, NY(Zone 5b)

I lived on a Kibbutz in '80-'81. Does that count?

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

It does for me!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Me too. I didn't even make it to Woodstock.

Columbus, OH

The homemade matza that I made this year were the best ever. I'm not technically Jewish, but I can do better than Entenmann's. I made matza coated with sea salt caramel and chocolate this year, it was great.

Troy, NY(Zone 5b)

the worst job I had (lasted one day) was packing chickens into market crates. They never put me on livestock again (can we say JAP?) . When they found out I could sew I was in the laundry repairing clothes. I will never forget this woman Leah I worked for there. She was old and crochety and a survivor she was not well liked on the kibbutz and tended to be a loner. She took a shine to me and no one could understand why (or how) I loved her. Everyone thought it was strange that we had a friendship.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

You were probably kindred spirits in some way. It's good that she found someone to connect with! My uncle spent time on a kibbutz, too, many many years ago and they had him doing menial jobs, which struck me as a poor use of resources since he was a Phi Beta Kappa from Brown. But later I understood that that was standard.

Laurel, I never made Woodstock either, but this fall in France some British ex-pats had a Woodstock celebration to commemorate the anniversary, and the friend whom we were visiting was the only one attending who had actually BEEN to Woodstock.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

GH the people assigning the jobs were probably Yalies.

Bookreader, my Hebrew name is Leah, I love to sew, can get real crotchety and am working away on getting old. Hmmm.

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