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Australian and New Zealand Gardening: Bromeliads for novices and addicts. April-May 2011

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

April 26, 2011
4:52 PM

Post #8522488

I think its time we started a new thread for those who have slow connections.
Welcome one and all. Post your bromeliad pics and questions here, or just drop in for a chat. We came from here. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1164337/
This is Aechmea 'Del Mar'
Sue

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 26, 2011
11:58 PM

Post #8523352

Hi everyone,

I'm glad you started a new thread Sue, the other one was getting a bit long wasn't it?

Here's a few pic's of a couple of different clones one of my favourites, Ae recurvata var. Benrathii.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
12:00 AM

Post #8523355

2

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
12:02 AM

Post #8523356

3

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
12:03 AM

Post #8523358

4

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
12:04 AM

Post #8523359

5

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
12:07 AM

Post #8523361

6

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
12:08 AM

Post #8523362

That's all folks,

All the best, Nev.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

April 27, 2011
2:45 PM

Post #8524610

Nev, I love the colour in your Benrathii. I am waiting for mine to flower. Seems everything is reluctant to flower this year, maybe because of all the rain?

This pic is mine from a previous year. Is it more purple because it gets very little light? It is growing on a tibouchina tree, and has been there for many years.

Karen

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
10:52 PM

Post #8525502

Hi Karen,

I never thought about mounting them on a tibouchina.

I have quite a large one which I'm always threatening to cut down because of all the mess it makes dropping it's flowers on top of a shadehouse roof, It's a pity it's growing where it is otherwise I could mount some benrathii plants on it also.

All the best, Nev.

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
11:15 PM

Post #8525511

Nice pics, you two. I planted some A. benrathiis in my window boxes this year, and its nice to look out on the few that are flushing pink now. Karen, you must have been a bromeliad grower for quite awhile to ammass such a clump. I've had them in the garden for years also, but they seem to have taken quite awhile to reproduce.
Nev, that Tibouchina looks too nice to remove. Cant you just suspend some shade cloth beneath it to catch the petals/leaves?
I ducked out to the shade house to take a few pics, but only got two or three before the rain started again. I was all enthused after reading the latest bromeliad journal from NZ. Every now and then I go in there and pull out some things to put in the garden. Probably just aswell it rained, or I wouldn't come in untill dark.
Sue
The big one to the left is Aechmea mexicana

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

April 27, 2011
11:16 PM

Post #8525513

Here are the broms on the northern side. A bit of a mixture of Vrieseas (far left) Neos (middle) and odd bods on the right.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

April 28, 2011
12:38 AM

Post #8525543

Sue, I love seeing the broms massed together like that. So lovely. The shorter days will soon be turning quite cool, so I guess the plants and ourselves will soon be hybernating. I've had some broms for a very long time, but didn't really get the bug until more recently. Some tough ones out the front need thinning right down now. We have started work out there, and the broms will need to be tidied up. They will also start getting more harsh afternoon sun, so will see how that goes in summer, too.

Nev, the only problem with the tibouchina is the density of the canopy. It doesn't let much sunlight in at all. Your tree looks marvellous and it would be a shame to have to take it down. I am going to start another piece of benrathii and put it where it will get more light, just to see what happens to the colour.

Karen


This message was edited Apr 28, 2011 12:41 AM
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

April 28, 2011
12:46 PM

Post #8526590

Hi everyone,

Karen,I find that benrathii and all of the other recurvatas I have do much better and colour up the best in full sun, wind, rain (the lot) In my opinion, they are "bullet proof" an I grow them in the most exposed areas in the yard. I don't know how they'd go in regular frosts though as we only ever get the mild ones here (very rarely).

Even in the pic below with some other hardy plants, they are right out on the edge for more exposure.

All the best, Nev.


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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

April 28, 2011
1:51 PM

Post #8526687

Thanks Nev. The pic looks great. I am going to do it!

Karen
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 1, 2011
7:04 PM

Post #8533319

so what did everyone get up to this past weekend? Its awfully quiet in here. Theres even an echo...echo...co...
It rained here most of saturday, but sunday was nice, so just tidied up any dead leaves, checked the progress of seed pods and seedlings, and all is well. I am in need of a bromeliad fix, but it will have to wait untill the sun shines a bit more and I can get on with some work!
Sue
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 1, 2011
7:28 PM

Post #8533368

Hi Sue and everyone. My broms are doing really well now that I've repotted and de-pupped most of them. Sue the ones you sent are looking so beautiful. Hopefully you'll have some more coloured ones for me soon. John's mouth dropped when he saw them. He went to the markets down his way yesterday and got a pot of 12 or more Aech piramidalis with 2 flowers for $25. Sounds like a great buy to me. Will have my new camera soon so will be able to show you just how good everything is going. Nev did you get your D-mail? Colleen
perke_patch

May 2, 2011
4:26 AM

Post #8533822

Hi Sue. Sorry you felt so alone all weekend. I haven't had much time to get on the computer this weekend. We had a family BBQ Sunday for our 40th anniversary. We also had babysitting duty with our Emily. We watched cartoon DVDs, did some creative crafts for Mum for mother's day, built towers with blocks ... oh and she played horticulturist and potted plants. She'll be working for us soon. You have to laugh when she tells you what she is (horticulchist) and does the demonstration of what to do. We are now babysitting a pot with the roots of a shallot planted in it. The stupid thing is the middle is lifting up above the rest and I think it is actually growing.

Nev, I think I cooked our containers of seeds today. A couple were actually starting to show green shoots too. We had moved the shelf units for our BBQ and this morning I started putting them back but had only moved the seedling unit to the general area and starting bringing the other 2 when we had to take Em home. When we got back the seedling unit was half in the sun and the zips were down so the heat in there was very high. We moved it immediately, unzipped and removed lids etc but we will have to wait to see if they continue growing. Luckily we still have some seeds in the fridge and can harvest more. I'll just get Jen around and we can pull the middles out of neos again. hahaha

Sue has Jen filled you in on our trip to Gympie Wednesday???? we had a lovely day and came home with a boot full of plants and lots of photos. I will upload them to the computer soon and post some for you to drool over. Patersons are such lovely people who made us welcome gave us a cuppa and provided a snack. We returned the favour by making their work so much easier by reducing the number of plants they have to look after. I'm sure they are so grateful for this lighter load hehehehe. We topped it off by calling in to Coolum on the way home to see Cheryl Basic. I came away with some seeds from a couple of vriseas. (I hope they didn't cook today and will still shoot) It was a very very good day.

Wendy
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 2, 2011
1:31 PM

Post #8535001

Wendy, whenever I have to buy a bunch of shallots I simply use the one or two that I need then plant the rest into the garden for future use. Some people actually do replant the bottom part of the ones they use though, and they regrow with no problem whatsoever, so Emily might be able to teach you oldies a thing or two yet. hehehe.

I can't wait for our little Joshua and Isabelle to be old enough to help out in the garden and kitchen. Josh's Mum has already been warned that when he comes to visit Nan is going to teach him to cook and to be a gardener. Izzy isn't likely to be here nearly as often, but she'll be roped in as well, whenever the opportunity arises. She's nearly 1 now, so the next time we see her she'll be walking and in amongst everything.

Pam

This message was edited May 3, 2011 6:33 AM
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 2, 2011
8:31 PM

Post #8535942

Hi everyone,

I have to agree with Sue, it has been very quiet on here lately, I was trying to think what I had said that stopped you all talking to me.

Colleen, what the hell is "D" mail ? I must warn you all I'm very computer illiterate and don't understand a lot of these foreign names, so please be patient and I'll try to learn. I know what E mail is, but "D" mail, does that come after "C" mail?. I also know what a tripod is, but an Ipod, well that's a different matter all together; and now "D" Mail, ... as Pauline once said "Please explain"????

It must be the season for celebrations, first my youngest grandson's first birthday, then another grandson's second and followed by his mother's -------- (if I write her age I'll be dead!). So we had a combined weekend celebration which I'm still getting over. Just watching three grandsons from 1-4 play, where do they get the energy? I was exhausted just watching them, but I enjoyed every minute of it.

Wendy it looks like you've learnt your first painful lesson about raising brom seed. The heat build-up inside those plastic shelters is comparable to the heat build-up in a car parked in the sun with the windows wound up. Never mind, I've got heaps more seed so if you need some replacements just give me a yell. I wouldn't write off the ones that hadn't yet germinated though, as you may find that the extra heat may have been just what the doctor ordered to trigger them into action.

Pam, another thing we always did with our kids when they were little, was to put the end of a carrot that's been cut off on a bed of wet cotton wool in a saucer with about 1/2" of water; the kids got a real kick out of watching the ferny top re-grow.

Enough talking; back to re-potting heaps of prickly Aechmea recurvata benrathii plants and then finding where somewhere to put them.

All the best, Nev.


ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 2, 2011
11:59 PM

Post #8536141

Nev, if you look at the top of the page in DG dave's garden you will see mail. Click on that and it will take you to your D-mails. Mine tells me when I have a message. Colleen
perke_patch

May 3, 2011
4:06 AM

Post #8536235

Nev, I think you may be right ... I checked the seeds today to see how they have coped and the containers that hadn't yet started shooting, appeared to have some spots of green today. Even the ones that had already shot seem to still have green spots showing so hopefully we did the right thing as soon as we saw it. We still have some of the seed left so we had a few bases covered.

Pam you have some good years ahead with the little ones. You just never know what they are going to do next. I bumped into Emily and her mum and baby in shopping centre today. Emily started off saying she was hungry for icecream so we sat down for a cone. When I said I was going into Kmart to top up some clothes in Em's draw at my place she said she would help. They had bought a small wheelie bin which Em was pushing around. We chose a couple of long sleevd tops, a jumper and a couple of legins for her, then chose a pair of shoes and a pair of plastic sandals for next year. When we got to the checkout I was amazed to find about 4 or 5 each of tops and pants. I didn't even see her put them in there. It came to $58 when I was expecting about $30. We're now all topped up for sudden sleep overs.

When I got home from shops it was too late to save the washing from the storm. Em helped me put all the little plants out into the rain. We had just finished when Dad came to take Em home and the heavens opened with lightning and thunder. I'm glad I didn't have to drive in that. And my hubby and son were out in the boat riding out that storm because they didn't have time to get back to the boat ramp. BUT!!!!!! they caught all their best fish during that storm. Thank god Darren is on holidays and I didn't have to go with Johnny and sit that one out. Thank god I was home safe and nearly dry.

Nev you sound like you enjoyed your family gathering as much as I enjoyed mine. I had 4 of my grandkids here on the weekend too but aged 6 weeks, 3, 8 and 12 yrs. Yours sound like a boisterous bunch of boys under 4. I bet you knew they were there.

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perke_patch

May 3, 2011
4:08 AM

Post #8536241

sorry I got carried away and clicked before I was finished. The photo is Em and Rylee. We're going to print that one out to put in the photo frames Em painted the other day.

Wendy
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 3, 2011
5:33 PM

Post #8537835

Hi everyone,

Yes Wendy, there's nothing better than being with your grandkids and watching all the little changes take place as they develop their own personalities. A little while ago my eldest grandson wouldn't give his little brother a toy he was playing with and I took him aside and explained that although it was his toy, it's still nice to share things with others. The message was understood and he gave his little brother the toy and told him it was "his turn now".

My eldest grandson loves to help in the garden and a few weeks ago we had a change from the norm. as I was doing something in the garage with a screw driver; he was out there "assisting me" as usual and said, "Poppy, I need the screw driver", when I told him I was using it, he just said, "it's nice to share things Poppy". Touche! What goes around comes around. What could I do except give him his turn of the screw driver.

All the best, Nev.
77sunset
Merino
Australia

May 3, 2011
10:21 PM

Post #8538590

Just finished my new brom pole. Now I need advice as this is my first try with broms planted this way. How do I keep them more upright as the water runs out ? I put all of those I thought may be the smaller ones but we will see as they grow.
There are Alley Cat, Gracilis, Fireball, Lilliputiana, Rubra, Inferno and Morning Rain from memory without running out to see .
Hubby drilled the 2"holes for me and I have the pole over a steel post with broken brick in the bottom to keep it steady. I filled the centre with coconut fibre and used more fibre to push in around each one to hold it. Do I need to do anything else or will this be enough for them to grow in ?
Please dont think I have mistreated the plant next to the pole. It was an orphan bought in that condition.
Someone on this thread said maybe V. splenriet ?
The greenhouse is now very full so I have to stop buying broms. Hhmmmmmm...( there is that new empty greenhouse !!!!!!)
NO NO ...I must smack myself.
Jean.

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perke_patch

May 4, 2011
2:18 AM

Post #8538651

Hi everyone.
Jean I like you pole. Did you see the Better Homes and Gardens a couple weeks ago where they made a screen wall and put in a panel of those white poly pipes with squares cut in them to plant a vertical wall. I would love to do a screen like that with all different broms. You've given me the incentive to give it a go if I can only find the plans on their website otherwise I will have to make it up as I go.

Nev, I love the things that come out of the mouths of little ones. When I was teaching we would hear personal details of the kids homelife and what parents would get up to. I don't think parents realise the types of things kids go to school and tell their teachers or repeat things they have heard parents talking about at home.

Yesterday I bumped into the little ones at the shops and Emily says "grandma we need to have an icecream now cause Mum didn't give me lunch". I'm sure she probably grazed all day long at home like she does when she is here.

Wendy
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 4, 2011
3:29 AM

Post #8538680

Wendy, teachers have a saying that we tell parents, " If you don't believe what they say happens at school we won't believe what they say happens at home. " And just on a brommy note, Ray and I took a quick dash up to the brom sale at Noosa on Saturday and I got this Vriesea called Warana Down. I like the vertical lines in it. Love your pole Jean.

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 4, 2011
3:31 AM

Post #8538681

Oops, I meant Marochydore. Also got this Neo Cherry Delight. Jen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 4, 2011
3:53 AM

Post #8538695

Woweeee they're very nice. Colleen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 4, 2011
1:17 PM

Post #8539611

Hi everyone.

Hi everyone,

Jean, firstly let me say that my answers to your questions about your "Totem Pole" are only suggestions, as although I have seen Strawberries successfully grown in this way I have never personally seen or grown bromeliad plants on plastic pipe.

You ask two questions, “How do I keep them more upright as the water runs out?” and “Do I need to do anything else or will this be enough for them to grow in ?”

Let me say that for new plants to establish a good root system they must be firm in or on whatever media they are growing, if they are loose, as soon as the new roots start to penetrate, they will be broken as soon as the plant moves. While ever the plant can move this will continue and the delicate new roots will continually be broken and eventually they just refuse to put down any more roots and live off the sustenance of the original plant instead.

So with this in mind, you need to make sure the plants are firmly attached and can’t move. You will find that after a couple of weeks the growing media will have settled and needs to be firmed up again anyway. I have found when mounting plants, the only successful ways of doing this is to nail the plant on with the nail going through the rhizome and into the mounting (usually wood), by using a suitable waterproof glue, or by tying; and in your case I would advise tying. I have always used thin strips of black plastic bird netting a couple of inches wide; as the tighter you pull on these the thinner and less obvious they will become.

Place the plant in the position in which you want it to grow then locate the strip of bird neting firmly around the lower part of the plant (in your case Neo’s) by passing it behind the lower leaf and attach firmly to the mounting (the plastic pipe) using a reef knot as this won’t slip (Remember your Girl Guide days). To make the whole thing look more appealing, cover the strips of bird netting with “old man’s whiskers” (Tillandsia usneoides) and everything looks natural again. Make sure you check the firmness again in a week or two and adjust if necessary.

Remember that plants grown this way will dry out quicker than those in pots so occasional misting and a regular foliar feeding should keep them happy.

Nice plants Jen, I especially like the Neo though as they have always been my favourites.

All the best, Nev.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 4, 2011
2:21 PM

Post #8539760

What Nev said! Just a couple of extra points though. Don't use a silicone product if you decide to glue them on. It can be toxic to broms. Liquid Nails is quite successful. It also comes in clear these days, which some find useful for attaching broms to pieces of wood.

As for tying, I always keep budding tape (also known as grafting tape) on hand for any tying jobs in the garden. It's clear, so isn't too obvious. Although it's easy to tear where you want, to get a suitable length, it's also strong. In spite of our Queensland sun being very harsh, and I've never had it break when in place. It's also dirt cheap these days- around $4 for a roll that goes on forever.

Also, Jean, it's probably a bit late now, but may be worth bearing in mind for your future poles - I think I'd be inclined to use the type of coconut fibre that comes as a mulch block (if you can find the one without added fertiliser). I suspect it would compact a lot less than the loose fibre.

Pam

This message was edited May 5, 2011 7:25 AM
77sunset
Merino
Australia

May 4, 2011
2:40 PM

Post #8539804

Thanks for the great tips on securing my broms. I will do as suggested and use a block of the fibre. . I will also tie them on and be careful with extra watering. I made the pole to have somewhere to put the smaller ones as I cant hang them in the greenhouse.
Thats the only drawback to the plastic greenhouses, they have a light frame.
When moving a few broms so I could get the pole in, I found one of the larger broms has a flower stem . They must really like their new home to be flowering now. I also found that the N. Alley Cat had flowered , but as it used to be up in a basket, I never looked inside.
Jean.
downunder2
Hampton
Australia

May 4, 2011
5:18 PM

Post #8540146

You mention Old Man's Whiskers, alias Spanish Moss. How do you look after it as well as misting? I heard someone is attaching bits to pieces of wood with glue. Can I do this? And the seeds. How do you generate them? I have never seen the flowers, but I need to look with my glasses on, I guess.
Carol
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 4, 2011
6:00 PM

Post #8540250

Hi Carol,

I have found that like all grey leaf Tillandsias, it doesn't like to be overwatered. It does however like plenty of good air circulation and good light, not fully exposed to full direct overhead "scorching" summer sun. I never feed mine and it grows just fine; in fact it grows too fast sometimes and I have to tear clumps off and re-locate them somewhere else or give them away.

I have never glued or tied it to anything, I just drape it over whatever I want it to grow on and forget about it. You can even suspend it from a wire hook (NOT COPPER) and it will grow. Mine is mostly on tree branches or draped over horizontal lengths of thick fishing line strung between two anchor points.

The flowers are minute, and you really need to clean your glasses well to see them clearly. But instead of straining your eyes, have a look at this greatly magnified picture instead.



All the best, Nev.

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 5, 2011
2:25 AM

Post #8540741

Very interesting advice everyone, thanks. Wendy's husband, Johnny has an excellent way of securing broms using a handtool a bit like a staple gun that bends the wire bits that come with it around the brom and whatever you want to attach it to. Help Wendy, can you explain it better??? They have broms attached to heaps of things all over the yard. Nev, here are a couple more recently purchased Neo photos for you. Jen
Neo Heartbreaker

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 5, 2011
2:30 AM

Post #8540745

Neo Cee Bee named after Cheryl Basic

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 5, 2011
2:35 AM

Post #8540749

Neo Dear Friend mini

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perke_patch

May 5, 2011
2:45 AM

Post #8540754

Hi everyone.Carol. I haven't seen your name appear before so welcome.

We have a friend in Cleveland who has large clumps of Old Man's wiskers growing on barbed wire attached with plastic pegs. The birds never take any so whenever we run short we top up with some of her clumps. Some of our clumps are attached with wire hooks, some are simply draped over the barbed wire, some are draped over branches. Whatever works and makes it difficult for the birds.

I had a disaster today with our seedlings. I was upstairs babysitting the new baby when the chooks were out. When Johnny came home Max the dog chased the girls out from the back patio but 2 got trapped inside the bottom shelf of the seedling house. Unfortunately the trays on the bottom shelf were all sent flying and spilled. There goes 2 trays of tills which had finally showed signs of shoots after months of persevering with misting. Another tray had achmeas just shooting, and a couple of vriseas which I don't think were ever going to shoot. All up it was nothing I can't replace but thank god the chooks are moving over the road next week. It's lovely to have chooks as pets and have free range eggs but it is a hassle finding someone to come here every day to care for them when we go away and trying to keep them out from under the house can be a pain. They've also developed the habit of getting into the seedlings but they don't worry the bigger plants. I think they even cross pollinate some of them drinking the water from them.

We've started separating the chook shed from between the boat shed and the vrisea shed ready to dismantle next week and rebuild in a neighbours yard the same day. Once this job is all done and vrisea shed enlarged we intend to take off in the motorhome but only for a short trip of about 3 weeks. We're only going half way down NSW but not as far as Sydney unfortunately so will not be visiting your area Nev. Maybe next time. We have to be back in Brisbane for medical appointment in June. We'll grab another short trip later in the year when it's warmer.

Can anyone identify the plant in this photo. I think it is an ananas because of the little pineapple thing on top.

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perke_patch

May 5, 2011
2:50 AM

Post #8540758

here is a close up of the pineapple on top.

I can't think of the name of the things Jen is talking about so I'm just going downstairs to take a photo of them for you. I'll be back in a moment.

Wendy

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perke_patch

May 5, 2011
2:56 AM

Post #8540762

this is the tool and the clips we use

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perke_patch

May 5, 2011
2:59 AM

Post #8540763

and this is how we use them, but I'm not sure they would be any use for a hard surface like the white plastic/poly pipe.

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perke_patch

May 5, 2011
3:06 AM

Post #8540765

we also use U nails to attach plants to trees or timber pieces. They are like a normal nail but U shaped and you hammer 2 bits in on either side of a plant stem. They come in lots of sizes.

this photo is a fish net totem wrapped around a timber post and filled with mini neo fireball using the C shaped clips and special tool in previous pics.

Wendy

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

May 5, 2011
12:54 PM

Post #8541814

wow splinter- i love Ae recurvata... mine hasnt flowered for a while but heres when it did. Its alot bigger clump now but it was just one plant.

This message was edited May 5, 2011 3:55 PM

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dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

May 5, 2011
1:51 PM

Post #8541924

you know this group has got me eyeing up the broms at work & wondering if anyone would miss a pup...
and the warehouse has broms for Mother's Day, wonder if meemum would like one.
I know she would share a pup if it produced for her.
my bil. nutans are inside now - getting too extreme outside, frosty followed by hot sun, don't think they were liking it at all.
I also found out what happened to the parent plant, another brom fan nabbed it when she saw it outside & neglected.
I was telling her about how the leaves had been cut off then it vanished, she told me it had gone home with her & has recovered & looks good.
I'm not telling them in the office - they didn't want the plant until I told them what it was & by then it had vanished.
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 5, 2011
2:09 PM

Post #8541979

Oooh, look at all the discussion going on in here. Wonderful!
Hello Carol and welcome to the brom thread.
Wendy, I have the same clips and I think it is a fencing tool. In NZ we called them hog clips? And used them when upholstering car seats and the like. I also use them around the broms and shade house. Good for attaching shade cloth to wires also. I'm not familiar with your little plant, but it does look ananas.
Jen, I love your new purchases and am sitting here slightly green!
Jean, well done with your pole. I think I'll have to have a go at one too, but not sure what I'll make it out of yet. I have a few small logs, but one wasn't allowing water to reach the broms, so has become a good space to keep the Tills over winter. I will try to take some pics in the next few days.
Hi Bree, love your benrathii.
Hi Nev, good advice as always. Nice to have someone else answering. It saves the rest of us writing a long post! he he. My Spanish moss is always being knicked by birds, so I have some hanging on a timber fence, but out of sight. Whenever I need a bit, I just peer behind the shrubbery and there it is.
Hi Pam, where do you get the budding tape? We used it at TAfe but I've never seen it for sale anywhere. I have used florist tape for grafting instead (it works) but it isn't strong enough to use for tying things to trees e.t.c
Theresa, I bet you wished it was you who made it disappear! I think you should definitely get your Mum a brom, and get yourself one too. We all deserve a little treat now and then.
As per usual, I did write a lovely long post a few days ago, and got signed out while posting it, but rest assured, I am always dropping in, and trying to have a chat. I'll copy this to my mouse before i post, just incase!
Sue
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 5, 2011
10:53 PM

Post #8543070

Hello Hello. Its been busy in here so I have to catch up. I've been back in hospital, so not around, but back now all brand new again.

Got this till from Wendy last time I was there, and it is now flowering. I don't know the name though. There are actually two flowering bracts on it.

Karen

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gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 6, 2011
1:10 PM

Post #8544117

I used to have to buy the grafting tape at nurseries Sue, but noticed a few years ago that Bunnings now stocks it, usually in the same aisle as fertilizers etc, and near the rooting powders and gels in the local store.

They also sell fencing rings (AKA your Hog Clips, Sue) and the little tool - very handy gadgets to have on hand for a million and one jobs around the home and garden. I think the tool is around $14 from memory, but is a one-off purchase. The rings are as cheap as chips.

Pam
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 7, 2011
3:24 AM

Post #8545124

Karen, I hope you are well now. I think your little Tillandsia is cute, but I don't know its ID. Maybe Wendy?
Thanks for that info, Pam. To be honest, I've never actually gone looking for grafting tape, but I know the aisle you're talking about well. I'll have a look this week. You're right about that tool. I can't tell you half the things I've used it for! Hubby has found uses for it in the workshop too.
We had sunshine here today, and hoping it sticks around tomorrow so I can get some photos.
Happy gardening weekend all.
Sue
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 7, 2011
3:34 AM

Post #8545136

Thanks Sue. I am hoping Wendy knows. She still has another one there that should be flowering now too.
Karen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 7, 2011
3:04 PM

Post #8546220

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUqq4-ODfPU

This is a link to my first, rather shaky attempt to video my tillandsia wall. Can anyone please let me know if it works. Sorry the quality isn't good though.

Karen
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 7, 2011
4:58 PM

Post #8546415

Thanks for the video Karen. A little light in parts but overall looks great for a first attempt. Keep up the good work. Lovely plants as well. Colleen
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 7, 2011
5:31 PM

Post #8546495

An impressive collection of tillandsias there Karen. I love the bird noises in the background. A few times I've headed out with the camera on video mode and afterwards have been surprised at the racket going on in the background. I hadn't realised how much noise the birds were making - would rather have bird noises to traffic sounds any day!
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 8, 2011
12:57 AM

Post #8547074

Thank you both. Yes, the film is over exposed. I am actually a bit too short to take the pics of the wall, so the camera was pointing upwards into the glare. Will try again one day and see if I can stand on something, and aim down instead of up.

I love the fact that we have so many birds here. Not the small ones, but the parrots and other larger birds, including a pair of pesky crested hawks that cause havoc with the pigeons.

Karen
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 8, 2011
1:34 AM

Post #8547085

Thanks for your link Karen. You have a nice collection there. I got sidetracked looking through other videos too! I remember looking up bromeliads on Youtube sometime ago, and there was nothing. There are plenty of videos now!
Sue
Werauhia sanguinolenta

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 8, 2011
1:47 PM

Post #8547956

Wow Sue, that is a beauty. When I think I've seen them all, more keep coming. So lovely.

Yes, I admit to exploring the videos on YouTube myself. I also explore Photobucket. I expect Flickr have pics too, but I don't have an account with them.

Karen
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 8, 2011
2:08 PM

Post #8547983

I managed to kill my Werauhia sanguinolenta. It's not as drought tollerant as some. :(
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 8, 2011
2:57 PM

Post #8548049

Hi everyone

I hope all you mothers had a happy Mother’s Day and got lots of nice brom. presents.

Wendy, I really like the effect with the spiral on your totem pole, it looks fantastic and certainly something I’ll have a go at as I have a heap of Neo. Fireballs I don’t know what to do with. That tool with the wire clips seems to be something that would be pretty handy around the garden and I’m certainly going to look for one when I’m at Bunnings next.

I went to the monthly meeting of our bromeliad society on Sunday and there was a magnificent roll up of plants on the Point Score tables; it was just like a mini show. There was certainly a lot of oohs and arrs going on and considerable drooling as well. An announcement was made by our President that our local Bunnings is having a General Gardening Workshop on Thursday week and interested persons need to book, so I booked myself a place yesterday. The programme sounds very interesting and consists of five, forty minute sessions on “Flower garden management”, “Insecticides, fungicides and the natural alternatives”, “Vegetable garden management”, “Fertilizers both organic and in-organic” and it finishes with a “Q&A session for problem plants” where you can bring in problem plants or pieces from them to have the problem diagnosed and get a suggested treatment. Refreshments and lunch are provided and what’s more it’s all free.

Karen, I liked the video of you mixed brom collection; I have a mixed collection as well, and find that there’s always something different happening with something new to look at each day. I must say your video is much better than my first attempt which was just a blurr. I was told by a friend who videos weddings professionally, that the most common mistake made by “first timers” is that they move the camera too fast which causes the blurring. Next attempt I tried slowing it down a bit but the result was only marginally better, so I’ve now come to the conclusion that videoing isn’t for me, and I’m better off sticking to still photographs instead.

All the best, Nev.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 8, 2011
3:53 PM

Post #8548158

Nev, thank you for complimenting my poor attempt at video. Must now confess, I don't have a video, just that little movie setting on my digital camera, so settings are hit and miss. But good to capture that odd time when a photo just isn't quite enough.

Have a verandah full of very wet birds this morning. They've come in looking for food, as I guess the pollen in the flowers outside has been washed off.

Karen
perke_patch

May 9, 2011
2:47 AM

Post #8549075

Hi everyone. I hope we all got our washing dry today... NOT. Mine is hanging under the house feeling just as damp as when I hung it there this morning. At least the seedlings are loving their shower all day today.

Nev the first assessment of my seed growing is showing early results. The seed containers with lids firmly closed are showing signs of mould growth. However the ones with holes in lids or lids just sitting on top but not locked down are showing signs of lots of shooting future broms. All trays are inside the small seed raising dishes from Bunnings for $7.?? One tray is sitting inside the Bunnings dish with no lid at all and the little shoots are clearly showing more than one leaf but these need more regular sprays of water. I think the seed dishes are working because they have lids with windows in top which can be firmly closed or completely open or anywhere in between. There is lots of air circulation inside the dome lid and I can even put some water inthe bottom for a moist environment. The dishes are also stored inside the 3 shelf unit with plastic cover which is zipped halfway. This gets early morning filtered sun through the trolleys and is enough to warm the air inside. All up it seems to be a good environment for seed raising.

Johnny still prefers to grow seeds in spagnum and we have 3 trays of heiroglyphica seeds going:- 1 in living spagnum, 2 in spagnum zapped in microwave (seems to be dead), and 3 in coir (zapped in microwave). The seeds in living spagnum seem to be the best growth rate but early days yet.

Wendy
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 9, 2011
1:44 PM

Post #8550321

Wendy, you might like to try sprinkling some cinnamon powder on those that are showing signs of mould. It has anitfungal properties. I do love a good gardening experiment.

Pam
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 9, 2011
5:08 PM

Post #8550745

Hi all,

Wendy, with the containers that are showing mould, did you first microwave them and the mix before you started ?

I find this usually kills any mould spores (down here at least) and I don't have a problem. Then again, you are living in a different climate so you'll get different results. That's why is so interesting to do trials in different areas, however the findings will be useless for future reference if they are not recorded, so don't forget the boring part, and record types of mixes, types of containers, dates, number of days till germination and all that sort of information.

If you get mould before the seeds germinate, you could try killing it by spraying with a mix of 10 parts water to 1 part of "Domestos" normal household bleach (sodium hypochlorite). I don't know if it would hurt the new leaves though.

Have a nice holiday

All the best, Nev.

ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 10, 2011
3:26 AM

Post #8551556

A few pics of how my broms are going. Colleen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 10, 2011
3:29 AM

Post #8551559

another. the black one now has 2 pups. Colleen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 10, 2011
3:32 AM

Post #8551562

another.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 10, 2011
1:26 PM

Post #8552658

Hi Colleen,

Nice plants in a nicely arranged colourful garden.

What is the name of the Neo in the top left corner of picture two, and also what is the purple flower in the top left of picture three which seems to be growing out of the pond ?

All the best, Nev
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 10, 2011
2:05 PM

Post #8552729

Hello everyone. Colleen, your brom pics are wonderful. Love that black one.

Seems to be cooler than normal. Could be in for a colder winter this year. Have been spoiled over the years with shorter, warmer winters.

All this budget talk. For me, it is all about how it will affect my budget. Might not be able to buy as many broms and tills if it get tighter.

Predatress is showing some nice colour still. Many others are fading as the sun gets lower.

Karen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 10, 2011
4:21 PM

Post #8553117

Hi all. Nev the Neo is Raphael' and the purple flower is actually just hanging into the pond and it is Mona Lavander. It reaches the top of the SH. I just cut it back each year and away it goes again. Thank you both for your comments. I'm very pleased with the amount of colour I have. Still room for more though. lol. Colleen

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 11, 2011
2:01 AM

Post #8553957

Colleen, thay are all looking fantastic! Well done. Its an art getting the light right to get the good colours, and you've managed it really well.
Karen, nevermind about the budget. The electricity prices are keeping me poor. I can't understand how our Bill is so high with just two of us? no air-con, and no electric heater e.t.c
I spent an hour yesterday afternoon, just cutting off damaged leaves and pulling off old ones. I'm going to systematically work my way through the bromeliads and clean up the lot, not that they are too bad anyway. I'm already looking forward to spring, so I can pot up some seedlings and harvest some of the neo pups. My V. fosteriana is flowering, but no other vrieseas are in bloom just yet, so I'm collecting pollen in alfoil and freezing it, incase something worthy flowers in the next month or 3. Some of my other pollinating attempts have been successfull, and I have had a few pods ripen and open in the last week, so I am collecting them in envelopes, and getting the media ready to sow some over the next few weeks. I know its getting cold, but I can get them germinated on the digital set top box (lucky pensioners) and then keep them on the window sill, freeing up the set top box for the next lot.
Hi Nev, Hi Pam. I'm going to give that cinnamon a go, just to see what happens and I will give you my findings.
Sue
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 11, 2011
2:23 AM

Post #8553968

Sue I'm so pleased that you think I'm looking after your babies well. Send me more colourful ones please. I was so pleased with the last lot and I hope that they hurry and have pups so that I can share them with John. I have a list of some that I have to order from Nev . Will do that very soon Nev. Colleen
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 11, 2011
11:25 PM

Post #8556959

Thought I would show you all what I'm doing with some of the palm trunks. These were what I gathered about 2 months ago and John cut a hole with the chainsaw in the top. Does anyone know what the brom is please? Colleen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 12, 2011
12:41 AM

Post #8556980

Colleen, I was wondering how you used the palm trunks. That really looks great!
Karen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 12, 2011
2:11 PM

Post #8558431

Hi everyone,

I don't know what it's like where you all live, but it's bl..dy cold here. Three degrees in the shade house yesterday at about 8 o'clock with a cold wind coming from the south west and off snow if I'm any judge; it was "icey".

Colleen: Your pot made from a palm trunk look great and I know from experience they work well and are very effective and can be long lasting, but I notice the one in your pic is just starting to develop a crack so I need to pass on a tip about them.

There are two things I which I learned as a twelve year old kid, a long, long, time ago, (isn't it funny I can remember these things clearly yet I can't remember what happend last week).

Anyway, back to the tip; I often helped out on a farm when I was a kid and the farmers often used the trunks of Cabbage Tree Palms (I expect the trunks from your palms would act in the same manner) for various things around the farm, and I remember in particular two pig troughs about six feet long which were just palm trunks which had been hollowed with an adze out so they would hold pig swill. I commented once to the farmer about what a good idea it was and he said that his father had made them when he ran the farm before him so they must have been about sixty years old then, so they're certainly prettly long lasting.

The wife of the farmer was a great gardener who had lots of flower pots made from Cabbage Palm trunks as well. She had used them for years but they were prone to splitting as they dried out, and to overcome this, her husband had nailed bands of galvanised "hoop iron" strapping (can still be purchased at Bunnings and even has the holes for nails in it now) around the circumference in two places, one toward the top and one toward the bottom (similar to the bands around a wine cask). He used nails called clouts for this and they are also still available in hardware shops and Bunnings (although probably called something different now). They are galvanised and about 1.5 inches long with a quite large flat head.

Another word of warning about the fiberous nature of the timber. It does absorb and retain a lot of water so be careful you don't overwater.

I also noticed your comment to Sue about how you like colourful bromeliads; well to satisfy your craving, I'm attaching a web address of a Thai Bromeliad Forum given to me by a Thai friend. Unfortunately most of the text is in Thai but there are lots of pictures of some beautiful brom's. Try No. 407 on the list, "Variegated Plants" as an example

http://www.pantown.com/board.php?id=40508&area=4&name=board1&topic=407&action=viewi

Finally, your plant looks very much like one that's been going around down here for years by the name of "Beefsteak". It's very different to the one pictured on the FCBS Photo Index but once again possibly one that's been just given a name by someone years ago and never registered.

That's about it for now

All the best, Nev.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 12, 2011
3:10 PM

Post #8558557

Nev, Wow! Wonder if they give out free samples? Some fabulous plants in those pics.

Its cool here, but the sun is out and its shaping up to be another glorious Autumn golden day, if the wind stays away. The wind is icy, straight off the Artic, so heres hoping its just temporary.

Karen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 12, 2011
5:13 PM

Post #8558769

Hi Karen,

If you liked that, have a go at this one http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/bromeliad/msg060358348512.html

All the best, Nev.
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 12, 2011
5:32 PM

Post #8558826

Wow Nev. I could spend all day in a place like that. It's fabulous. Thanks for the tips re the palm. Will get some of that galv and I already have clouts so shouldn't be too hard to manage. That's very intesting about the pig-trough. People today aren't so inovative are they? It's a throw-away society and the younger ones don't have to make do like we used to. If something breaks they just throw it away and get a new one. Hopefully, I will be able to instill in these boys a little bit of recycling. Thanks again Nev for your in put and I'll be in touch soon. Colleen
perke_patch

May 13, 2011
4:56 AM

Post #8559703

Colleen I like those palm stump pots. They look effective and I'd say they would even look good with a couple of straps around them. could look quite rustic with a nice big brom hanging all over it. Could be as big or as small as you want. Please post some pics with the strapping around them for comparison.

Nev you are a font of knowledge with some amazing advice which we can all take on board not only the person you are answering. We'll have to try a chunk of palm when we get back.

I have taken some photos of our seeds planted on 20th April. See all the little broms of neo hearts music x fury after 3 weeks in zapped spaghnum.

Wendy

This message was edited May 13, 2011 10:04 PM

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perke_patch

May 13, 2011
5:07 AM

Post #8559729

Nev thanks for the links to those 2 groups of pics. I would love to walk through a garden like that. I wouldn't know which direction to look at first there appears to be nice broms in all directions.

here is another batch of seeds after 3 weeks - neo grace darling x concentrica variegata sown in coir. seedlings aren't as advanced as the last but definately showing some nice little leaves forming.
Wendy
perke_patch

May 13, 2011
5:09 AM

Post #8559732

woops forgot the pic.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 13, 2011
5:19 AM

Post #8559749

Hi Wendy,

That's done it, now you'll be hooked on growing brom's from seed for the rest of your life and soon your place will be like mine with babies all over the place.

All the best, Nev.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 13, 2011
2:30 PM

Post #8560858

Hi everyone,

I need your help. I need to remove the picture I posted in the previous post and don't know how to do it, can anyone please tell me.

All the best, Nev.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 13, 2011
2:38 PM

Post #8560875

Nev, with regards to copyright, while it's wrong to post a pic without the copyright owner's permission, a link to it is fine - literally just the link, NOT the picture linked from there, and showing up in the post.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 13, 2011
2:42 PM

Post #8560883

You posted while I was, Nev. The system here at Dave's is a pain to get along with if you want to totally delete a post ( or pic). I reckon you'd need to contact the admins to have it removed. There seems to be no way for us to do it ourselves.

BTW, if you scroll down in a post you've edited more than once, you can remove all the 'edited by' notifications, and just the one will show up after you post.
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 13, 2011
4:12 PM

Post #8561058

Hi everyone,

Thanks Gardengal, I've found where I can send a message to Daves Garden and have done so and requested that the pic be removed, here's hoping they can help me.

All the best, Nev.
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 13, 2011
4:49 PM

Post #8561180

Hi everyone,

Gee that was quick, it didn't take long to have the post deleted at all.

Now to start all over again.

Wendy, in my opinion for what it's worth, your Neo Grace Darling x concentrica variegata cross has the potential to produce some pretty good hybrids, and just for the record, please put me down for twelve of the babies as soon as they're big enough to travel if you have some to spare.

Concentrica is a tried and tested parent over many years, and to see some of just what it can produce, go to "http://botu07.bio.uu.nl/bcg/bcr/index.php", enter "concentrica" in the search facility, select "all" and hit the "search" button.

A list of about 500 concentrica hybrids will be listed and you can find the breeding history as well as a pic. of each. Just by selecting the third name on the list as an example (Neoregelia ‘Adrienne’) will show you just what it is capable of as a parent.

Another very good site is the FCBS (Florida Council of Bromeliad Societies) "http://fcbs.org/pictures.htm". It has a lot of the same records with thousands of pictures of the different genera as well. It also has pictures of most of the described species, which the BCR site doesn't have.

Both of these sites are magnificent resources for hybridists as well as for anyone with brom's who just wants to look at the pic's as well as being a valuable tool to aid identification of unnamed plants.

All the best, Nev.



ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 13, 2011
6:39 PM

Post #8561433

Good morning all. I have been outside doodling with the galv and clouts. Here's what I came up with. Colleen

Thumbnail by ctmorris
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gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 13, 2011
7:55 PM

Post #8561604

Colleen you're just too clever. That should look absolutely STUNNING in no time. :)

Pam
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 13, 2011
9:59 PM

Post #8561764

Hi Colleen,

You've done a good job; but there's one suggestion I would make with the bottom plant behind the galvanised strapping. Make sure it doesn't touch the new galvanising as the chemicals in it can harm the plant; this can be overcome if the strapping is first washed in vinegar to neutralise any chemicals on it.

I once had an experience where I hung a sheet of galvanised mesh at an angle and attached a lot of potted seedlings to it. Everywhere the leaves touched it they got burnt and went brown. I removed all the plants and ran over the whole sheet (both sides) with a paint roller soaked in vinegar as advised, and no more problems. Another way of course would be to paint the straps (both sides) or put some sort of barrier (plastic, bark, moss) between them and any plants they may touch.

All the best, Nev.

.
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 13, 2011
10:11 PM

Post #8561774

Thanks for the comments Pam and Nev. I have put some palm bark where the plant was touching so hopefully everything will be okay now. Colleen
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 14, 2011
12:32 AM

Post #8561825

Looks great, Colleen. Very inspiring! I'm eying off some of my palms that have grown too big and are headed for the chop. Nev you certainly are a font for practical information. Thanks to you both. Jen.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 14, 2011
12:42 AM

Post #8561826

Nev, I thank you for all your advice and info too.

Wendy, good to see those babies growing.

Colleen, I really love what you've done with the palms.

You are all such a clever bunch, and I love seeing your pics of your plants and the things you've done with them.

Karen'
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 14, 2011
1:24 PM

Post #8562634

Hi everyone,

Coleen, Jen and Karen, there's really no need to thank me for any advice I give as that's what these forums are all about, "sharing knowledge". If I know something which I think may be of use , I'll gladly share it, if I don't know the answer to a problem, I'll say so as well.

It's true that a lot of the older generation like me may not know much about all the new electronic gadgets available today (my computer drives me nuts!), but when it comes to practical things that don't require a power point or a battery, we can run rings around the "young 'uns", as we have had to make do with what we had by improvising and didn't live in a "throw away" age.

For example, the other day I was measuring something with my old wooden three foot rule, (yes I'm still using inches as well as centimeters) and a young friend of the family asked me, "what it was". When I told him and said that I had bought it when I started my apprenticeship as a carpenter in 1955, he looked at me like I had "two heads". He couldn't believe that it was possible for someone to look after something and maintain it in working condition all that time.

Give him a bit of paper and a pencil and ask him to add up some figures or answer a mental arithmetic question and he's "slow as a wet week", but give him a calculator to add up with or a mobile and tell him to text a message and he's light "greased lightning". Maybe there's a lot of truth in the old saying of "To each his own", but that doesn't stop me often wondering what the consequences would be if we had a "world wide" blackout for a month, and no electric power. Food for thought!

I'll get off my soapbox now

All the best, Nev.
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 14, 2011
1:31 PM

Post #8562643

Hi again,

I meant to ask, does anyone grow this plant?

Neoregelia 'Princess Di'

All the best, Nev.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 14, 2011
3:42 PM

Post #8562849

Good morning everyone. Nev, that is pretty. I went to Bunnings yesterday and was surprised at the range of bromeliads they had there. I didn't get any though it was tempting. I need to be thinking about getting the ones I've got through the cold ahead. I wonder how they'll go. My tillandsias are looking good at the moment, for now. I hope they are not too exposed for the cold to come. They are in the only spot that will get a small amount of winter sun during the morning, but will be "in the dark" for the rest of the day.

Keep warm, everyone.
Karen
77sunset
Merino
Australia

May 14, 2011
4:28 PM

Post #8562948

All these broms are so pretty. I am hoping for lots more color on mine when it gets warm again. I have quite a few pups coming on now. I found a new one yesterday on "Break of Day " The pup on "Hannibal Lector " is nearly as big as mum .
Reading all the tips on your posts, I will leave the pups on the mums until spring .
I am watching the flower stem on one plain green brom as it is a noid . I am curious to see what it is.
I notice that all the petals on the pretty billbergia flowers are curled up looking very pretty. Must get out and try for a photo if the sun comes out.
Jean.
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 14, 2011
4:44 PM

Post #8562975

Nev I have Neo Princess Di but it doesn't look anything like your's. I hope mine colours up like that. I've now put it on top of a palm trunk and hopefully it will get more sunlight and change colour. Colleen

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77sunset
Merino
Australia

May 14, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8563096

I managed to get into the area near this brom and get a pic of the flower. They are just about finished now but you can see the curled edges. I think I have a pic of more of the plant so you can see the foliage.
Jean

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77sunset
Merino
Australia

May 14, 2011
6:07 PM

Post #8563100

Here is a pic of more of the plant. You can see the stripes at the base of the leaves. Quite large buds when they come. Much bigger and prettier than Queens Tears.
Jean.

This message was edited May 15, 2011 12:08 PM

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 14, 2011
7:09 PM

Post #8563223

Nev, I had Princess Di but was going through a stage of giving away all the Neos that were mostly green until maturity. The first photo is of mum and the second is one of the pups that had this interesting stripe in it. I'm sorry I got rid of it now but hopefully my sister might have it and I can see what future generations do. Jen

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 14, 2011
7:12 PM

Post #8563226

Princess Di pup

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 14, 2011
7:35 PM

Post #8563268


Jen, going by the pic of your pup, it looks like that why mine's that colour. It is a pup, so I'll wait til it matures a bit and see what colours I get. Colleen
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 14, 2011
11:19 PM

Post #8563461

I've had Princess Di for awhile, and have always thought of it as a bit 'Ho Hum' I've never had the colour Nevs is, but maybe I have a different clone, or just an inferior pup. I bought mine off Ebay, so didn't exactly get to pick my plant. I have plenty of pups from my original, but none have reached maturity yet. This seems to be the only pic I've taken of it, which indicates that it didn't do much for me during its growth changes.
Colleen, your palm trunk pot is a great idea! I have used a couple of hollow gum trunks to plant in, and they do eventually split, but then I can just lie them flat and they act like a bowl to plant in.
Jean, I like your Billbergia. I think its the one you sent me bits of way back when? If so, I have grown some in high light, and the foliage goes a burgundy, with a nice curled leaf tip. Also very quick to pup.
Sue

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 15, 2011
12:08 AM

Post #8563466

Hi everyone,

Hi evryone,

Just to set the record straight, that picture of Neo. Princess Di, wasn't my plant. I don't even have it, and the reason I asked if anyone grew it was that I'm after a pup if anyone wants to sell/swap one.

What about you Sue, you say you have plenty of pups from your clone, are you interested in a swap? If so send me an email so we can sort something out. Don't forget I already owe you some I'm holding as a "rain check". Have you got that other shade house built yet?

The one in this pic isn't one of mine either, it's just another pic to brighten your day. This is Neo. Wild Raspberry which is a hybrid bred by Jack Koning of Port Macquarie and is something a little bit different to the usual pic's of Neoregelias.

All the best, Nev.



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perke_patch

May 15, 2011
4:19 AM

Post #8563649

Nev, I love that wild raspberry. When we get to Port Macquarie I will do my best to get one of those out of Jack. If I can get 2 I will even bring one back for Jen as a thank you for looking after my little seeds while we are away. I don't have a Princess Di but if they look like that photo you showed us it will be on my list.

Nev you said you thought the grace darling x concentrica var would make impressive pups and you want some. I had some spare seed saved for you - didn't I put it in the box for you????? If not I will certainly put some in an envelope and send to you. It will still be in the fridge downstairs.

Colleen I can't wait for Johnny to get his chainsaw fixed and decides to cut down one of our palms so I can get some nice palm pots.

In Hervey Bay this weekend we were in our son Paul's garden looking at his broms and naming them for him. He has decided to get into them more than he was before. He said he wants to grow them like us so I was showing him how to collect seed and guess what????? one of his tillandsias with a spent flower had a seed pod splitting open with lots of seed. He said he wasn't ready to grow them yet so I collected them and brought them home. Now I have a container of till fasiculata clavispica for Jenny to look after for me. Hopefully when I get home they will be starting to shoot.

Paul gave me these timber mounts for plants. They get truckloads of timber to start the furnaces at work and the guy who cuts them up slices off some of the bark into strips for Paul. He has long lengths of them in his garage and cuts them up into these pieces. He gave me some to bring home. Paul has a lot of tills and even mini neos mounted on them. after about 4-6 weeks he can remove the ties and the neos are ready to hold themselves on. I can't wait to come back and mount a few.

Wendy

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perke_patch

May 15, 2011
4:24 AM

Post #8563658

something must have gone wrong with pic of timber bits. here it is.
Wendy

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 15, 2011
4:30 AM

Post #8563670

Now you have 8 pieces instead of 4 Wendy.lol Colleen
perke_patch

May 15, 2011
4:32 AM

Post #8563674

this is till fasiculata clavispica. see if this pic works.

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perke_patch

May 15, 2011
4:33 AM

Post #8563676

when I looked the pics wouldn't show up so I thought I better post again. worked all along. sorry. Wish I did have 8 Colleen. I'll have to use these 4 and go to get some more.
Wendy

This message was edited May 15, 2011 9:34 PM
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 15, 2011
4:42 AM

Post #8563683

I just stood the till up for you Wendy. Colleen

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perke_patch

May 15, 2011
4:46 AM

Post #8563685

Pity you all don't live here in Brisbane. When we came home from Hervey Bay today we brought home a large esky full of 5kg boxes of frozen fresh prawns caught last week. Apparently the seafood coop up there offered the trawlers $35 a box for their catch while offereing same boxes to the public for $78. I think this is disgusting profiteering at the expense of the primary producer (just like the poor farmers) Anyhow one of the trawler operators told them to shove it and he would rather dump his catch back at sea than give them a bigger profit for doing nothing. He asked my sister (a trawler operator too) if she wanted any before he dumped the rest at sea so she offered to sell some for him. Luckily she told us Friday night so we were prepared with the esky in the boot. We brought home 20kgs at $10 per kilo. Much cheaper than woolies and much fresher. Jen has her half box and we had some for tea tonight also. Yummy. Filled our freezer too so #1 son's 40th birthday party will have prawns rathe than pizza. Much yummier

Wendy
perke_patch

May 15, 2011
4:50 AM

Post #8563690

thanks Colleen. I have several obviously different types of fasiculata including this one I think but they are all called fasiculata. I now know I have gnat (a very large one), nidus (a minor or much smaller version), now the clavispica one as well as the normal fasiculata, oh and one labelled vasiculata but there is no such thing I don't think. It is a much smaller compact one with much stiffer leaves than normal fasiculata.

Wendy
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 15, 2011
1:34 PM

Post #8564639

Wendy does your sister in law still have any prawns or would they be past it now?

Pam

This message was edited May 16, 2011 6:35 AM
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

May 15, 2011
2:02 PM

Post #8564718

ok - I am now dead set convinced that my next house must have a conservatory so I can grow broms!!!
I am enjoying the easy care Bil. nutans, not often I bother with a plant that needs to be brought indoors for winter but they are so undemanding.
I have a really interesting pot plant stand, will share a pic & see if anyone can guess what it is ;)
one hint, my hubby is mad on aviation, especially classic planes.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 15, 2011
2:33 PM

Post #8564798

Good morning everyone,

Hi Wendy, I'll bet you're a lot warmer up there than I am down here.

The seed you sent was Painted lady x Fairy Plum and Narelle F3 A.F. hybrid, but definately no Grace Darling x concentrica. I certainly would appeciate some if you have a bit to spare.

Enjoy your nice warm holiday

All the best, Nev.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 15, 2011
3:02 PM

Post #8564872

Is that plant stand a propeller shaft or similar Teresa?

Pam
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

May 15, 2011
5:58 PM

Post #8565433

Nev - if you want to know what happens when you have no power for a month just visit the eastern suburbs of ChCh.
After the Feb 22 earthquake they were without power, water & sewerage.
Some suburbs may never be inhabited again.
I was hoping for a few more guesses on the plant stand but will tell you what it is...
it's a sleeve valve - formerly inside a Bristol Hercules engine, the kind the powers the Bristol Freighter...
or Bristol Frightener as it was affectionately known.
49,999 rivets flying in formation :)
My hubby plans to have it chromed eventually, I think it looks ok as a plant stand as it.
When he finally noticed that bil had taken up residence he was a little taken aback, not quite what he had in mind for Sammy the sleeve valve.
I'm going to post that pic on the aviation forum & see what reaction I get.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 15, 2011
8:33 PM

Post #8565826

Hi dalfyre,

Like most males of my vintage, I've always had a love old propeller type planes such as the spitfire, mustang, hurricane, lancaster, lockheed lightening , mosquito and ... and ... and ...

I'm fortunate that I only live about five minutes away from the HARS (Historic Aircraft Restoration Society) museum which is just across the way from the Illawarra Light Railway Museum (old 2' gauge steam and diesel trains) of which I am a member and we are often given a free show when they are test flying their old Catalina, DC3's and Neptune bombers around the local area, but I never ever thought I would see a part of a plane used as a home for a Billbergia.

Thank's for sharing

All the best, Nev.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

May 15, 2011
10:08 PM

Post #8565883

Nev - we were at Hars in October & were very impressed
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 16, 2011
2:13 AM

Post #8566001

Hi all. Just thought I'd invite you all to visit the Tea-room and join us on a magic carpet ride. If you go today you'll really only have to peruse today's posts to find out what we're up to.You too Nev. Colleen
perke_patch

May 16, 2011
4:17 AM

Post #8566068

Hi Pam. If you want some of those prawns phone my sister in Hervey Bay. I will dmail you her phone number.

Nev I sent your seeds off today. I wish I had time to find some more for you but it was a rush today loading the winnie. We are all ready to take off in the morning but when trying to recharge the telstra turbo tonight I have found they have disconnected the sim card so I now have to go somewhere to buy a new one and phone to activate it before I can recharge. I did take advantage of a local retravision store closing down and got a very cheap laptop to take away so I will be able to keep in touch easily once I get the turbo working.

Wendy
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 16, 2011
1:51 PM

Post #8567416

Good morning everyone,

Colleen... what/where is the Tea Room ?

Wendy... Good to see you getting away at last, I hope you both have a great break and find some good brom and fishing spots. I think Port Macquarie could be a good place to start looking for both. If you get to see Jack or Tamera, say hello for me

All the best, Nev.
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 16, 2011
2:13 PM

Post #8567458

Nev, Go to the Australian Gardening Discussion Forum click on that and then find Tearoom 88, We're in there . See you soon. Colleen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 17, 2011
1:58 PM

Post #8569696

Hi everyone (those that are left that is),

Seems a bit quiet on here since everyone's off travelling.

Oh well, I guess someone has to stay home and look after the brom's. I hope you all have a good time zipping all over the place on your magic carpet ride. Be careful to do up your safety belts so you don't fal off and watch out for the "Booze Bus" if you've been drinking "giggle water".

Here's some pic's of garden visits for those of you who stayed at home to do the chores.

http://s512.photobucket.com/albums/t329/splinter1804/Garden Visits/?start=all

All the best, Nev.

ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 17, 2011
2:14 PM

Post #8569728

Hi Nev. I'm so glad that I haven't been picked up yet. Your garden is absolutely fabulous. You should be very proud of the achievements. Brom heaven/ And I also love that you've incorporated that giant cactus into your garden. Absolutely heaven. Colleen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 17, 2011
4:04 PM

Post #8569954

Hi Colleen,

Sorry to disappoint you but those pic's aren't all of my garden. They were taken on a visit to the gardens of two brom society members and myself. My garden pic's are all the ones with NB on the top of the pic.

The one with the big cactus belongs to our president and the main point of interest with that picture is the big plant of Tillandsia Secunda mounted on the cactus and demonstrating just how it reproduces itself by pupping from the flower spike.

There is also another bit of an odity toward the bottom of the pic set where there is a pic of Billbergia pyramidalis with the flower coming from and old dead plant base in the pot instead of the top of the plant itself. It just goes to show how resilient bromeliads are and never miss an opportunity to reproduce themselves.

All the best, Nev.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 17, 2011
4:14 PM

Post #8569981

Good morning. So much to catch up on here. I've been rather busy running around all over the place, so haven't had much time. Always something on. I am hoping for a day of rest today, as I need it, but one can't count on the day remaining quiet.

Nothing is open, or flowering, or doing anything interesting here at the moment. Never mind. I am sure Spring will bring a flurry of activity around the place. Hope everyone is well and happy.

Karen
perke_patch

May 19, 2011
2:46 AM

Post #8573169

Hi Nev and all. We might be tripping but I am still here on this forum. We are now staying at Myleston, south of Coffs. We'll be here until at least Sunday. If we are enjoying it we might even stay a few more nights. It is lovely here, we can hear the surf just over the tree line. It is lovely and hot down here. seems to be hotter days than Brisbane at the moment. we are yet to use all our blankets even and I have put away the long sleeved nightie and taken out the summer one again. Lucky for me I packed it too. Once we close the van up it warms up nicely so we are not cold even at night.

I looked in my book of addresses and discovered that Peter Tristram is in the next suburb to here. only a short trip away. Sue if you want to do a brom crawl with me Johnny said he is happy to go fishing with Max. He says he is only interested in seeing Jack's and Sue's garden & broms and would prefer to surf fish this time. Let me know when Sue and I will be ready to go. Wish you were here Jen to go crawling with me but then who would look after the seeds.

Wendy
perke_patch

May 19, 2011
10:43 PM

Post #8575104

ahhh. spent a wonderful day ... 2 hours walking the beach this morning. Probably walked to Repton where Peter lives. Then back for a cuppa and toast before back to the beach where I layed on the warm sand soaking up some sun watching Johnny get wet to the waste trying to catch tea. after 1 bream he was going for another when the winder on new reel flew off into the surf. He quickly stood on it but the next wave came in and almost knocked him over. when it went back out no sign of winder anywhere. He's now using my reel until we go somewhere to buy a new reel. Ah well I enjoyed being dry and warm on the sand instead of wet and cold fishing.

I also went for a walk and collected a shopping bag of driftwood for till mounts when we get back home.

I could do this forever. This is a very nice park to stay in so if anyone is interested in a trip away I recommend Myleston Caravan Park.
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 20, 2011
1:40 PM

Post #8576075

Hi Wendy,

Good to see you're both enjoying your break, but bad luck about Johnny's fishing reel though. I guess it would have been worse if he had a big fish on at the time though.

With your drift wood for Till. mounts, make sure you soak it in fresh water, changing it several times to flush out all the salt otherwise it can burn the plants.

Also, I got the seeds you sent,thanks.

All the best, Nev.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 20, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8576113

Wendy, it sounds wonderful. I would love to do something like that. Hope Johnny gets a new reel in time for the next lot of fishing. I like Coffs Harbour, and indeed, just about all of those coastal towns on the way south. Port Macquarie is nice too. Have a great holiday.

Karen

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 20, 2011
8:17 PM

Post #8576796

Hi all, I am new here and new to broms, hoping to learn more and maybe learn what my broms are, lol. The title of this thread seemed right to me...novice, lol. I also read somewhere about the bromeliad bug... once you get one bromeliad you become obsessed, now that sounds like me too, only got into them a few months ago, now I am spotting them everywhere and can't get enough, have pots everywhere and looking for pups all the time. Oh and this is going to show just how "new" I am... I only just learned today that they only flower once and then produce pups until they die...the horror! I had no idea they died after flowering, I have a big orange one that produces lots of pups and it flowered not long ago, infact i only cut the spear off about 2 weeks ago...now to think it's going to die...ohhhhhhhhhhhhh. Glad I have all the pups still. I am not at all used to plants that die after flowering, I am use to have the same plant for a long time. Quite a shock to me, silly as that sounds.
Ok so now you know I am seriously a total novice, lol.

This message was edited May 20, 2011 8:23 PM
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 20, 2011
11:10 PM

Post #8576944

Hi springer, welcome aboard. I've only been here a short time myself but have really enjoyed the company and idea sharing since I joined.

You worry about your plant having flowered and now it's going to die; well its not as bad as it sounds because this living, flowering, dying cycle takes a bit of time to occur and the plant isn't going to die straight away.

True, once it flowers it won't flower again, but the original plant may go on for months or years and continue to reproduce itself in the form of pups. These too will then go on to flower and the cycle starts all over again.

Make no mistake, bromeliads are very resilient, and I've even had plants which have rotted and died back to just a bit of hard rhizome and still managed to produce a pup in one last valiant effort to continue the strain.

A lot of gorwers prefer to take off the pups as soon as they are of a sufficient size to encourage the mother plant to produce still more pups. Still other growers prefer to leave the pups on the mother plant until she eventually dies. They remove all dead leave as this process is taking place and finally they are left with a group of the same plants in the same pot which take over the growing space once occupied by the mother plant thereby leaving no trace of her ever having been there.

So you see it's all a matter of personal choice and depends on the plant and you own personal wishes.

I hope you have an enjoyable association with us and learn a lot.

All the best, Nev.
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 21, 2011
12:51 AM

Post #8576990

Hi Springer. It's always good to meet a fellow addict. Just following on from what Nev said, if you prefer your broms to last longer you are better to go for big ones with a longer life cycle such as Alcantareas or foliage Vrieseas. They often take years before they flower. The first photo is a Neoregelia. They have quite a short life cycle and fairly insignificant flowers but often beautiful foliage. The second photo is Vriesea Galaxy. It was about 3 years old before it flowered and the flower is quite spectacular.
C'mon Wendy, Sue and Belinda. I want to hear and see what you got at Peter's today besides a leech. I went down to Mal and Michelle's this morning and got an Aechmea Mexicana albomargin. and an Ae. Reginaldo. She had an enormous new Hohenbergia called Raspberry Ice, variegated with a lovely pink flower. Jen

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 21, 2011
12:58 AM

Post #8576992

Vriesea Galaxy

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 21, 2011
1:04 AM

Post #8576993

Hi Nev, thanks so much, you made me feel better about my big orange brom, at least it's not going to just fall over and die I guess.
Ok I have a question... do all broms only flower once? I happened to tell two friends who are a lot more into broms than I am, well been at it longer I should say, and they both said they have broms that flower every year and seemed as unaware as I was about the whole flower and die thing. So are there some that flower every year and not die? We live up north of Cairns, so it's very warm and humid and our winter is by no means cold, would that change anything or does that mean there are different species up here that flower more than once? These are ladies who tend to their gardens daily and the broms are spaced out one in each space of the garden, and lovely rocks in between and pups are removed as soon as they are big enough, so not plants that are crowded up in a big bunch where they might be mistaken which one exactly has flowered each time. More like feature plants in the garden. Until recently I only had the very common small green ones that don't every stop multipling so I had no idea they were in fact flowering and dying, and being replaced by pups, just thought it was the same ones, but my friends garden is not like that, hers are all spaced out and not those common green ones, nice big wide leafed ones some with red centers, lots of nice big ones.
Just thought you might know and be able to enlighten me.
Also do broms get seeds? My orange one had a big huge spear of flowers, would it of had seeds? Do they grow well from seeds or do you just stick to pups?
Thanks so much and thanks heaps for making me feel welcome :)

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 21, 2011
1:12 AM

Post #8576996

Hi Jen, thanks so much for that info :) I have so much to learn. I think I might have one or both of those two in your photos, wow i might get to find out what mine are, lol. I have been lucky to get lots of the neighbours, and then someone moved out of a house and left all their pot plants and the owner was going to throw them away, so I got them all. So lucky. But I don't know what they are, what they like, shade, sun, or how old they are.
We also got some at the local markets and they don't tell you much either, some only know how to say the price in english, so not much help there...but cheap, lol.
Can't wait to learn more :)
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 21, 2011
1:36 AM

Post #8577001

Wow Springer, you're game asking Nev if broms have seeds. I'll leave it to him to explain. Jen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 21, 2011
1:50 AM

Post #8577002

Hi Springer. Welcome to the world of Broms. I didn't know much about them either when I joined, and have found everyone wonderful with advice and friendliness.

I went to a yard sale today and got one new brom, a neo. pemiento, just a pup, though it still has some nice colour in it. Will try to get a pic of it soon.

I also got a stack of tillandsias. This one has the strongest perfume for such a tiny flower. It is absolutely beautiful. It is Till. caerulea.

Karen

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 21, 2011
2:04 AM

Post #8577004

oh oh, I am a bit nervous now Jen, lol, have I asked a bad question? I will await Nev's explanation
Hi Karen, wow is that a brom too? I really have a lot to learn, it is very cute, I must find out where to get some of them ones and how to look after them as well, I just had big ones that grow in the garden :)
so nice to meet you all
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 21, 2011
2:44 AM

Post #8577015

Hello Springer and welcome. I'm a novice too and have now been getting a nice collection of broms together. I don't believe there are any broms that flower more than once but someone with more experience with them might be able to enlighten you more. They are called mono? something, the word won't come to me at the moment. Good to "see" you anyway. Colleen

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 21, 2011
4:45 AM

Post #8577111

Hi All, Hi Springer and welcome. Good to have a bit of new blood! I think there might be the odd bromeliad that flowers twice, but I don't know what they are off hand, although i wouldn't think it would be very common. I don't think that the climate would make any difference, as most bromeliads flower from the central growing point, and flowering stops the process of vegetative growth. I'm pretty sure this is not reversible. Its possible that a bromeliad that flowers from between the leaf axils might possibly flower again, from between another leaf axil, but as i said, I'm not familiar with any of those that do. As for seeds, they are quite easy to grow once you know the techniques, but diiferent genera (neoregelia, Aechmea, Vriesea e.t.c) take different ammounts of time to mature, and some can take many years. Expanding your colection from pups is a much easier process, especially if you have no intention or desire to market your plants.
A good start with your bromeliads is just to familiarise yourself with the different genera and what sets them apart from the others. Billbergias tend to have upright tubular foliage and a spike with tubular, short lived flowers (but this is not always the rule!) Neoregelias are usually an open rosette of (sometimes) brightly coloured foliage, with a dome shaped head of purple/white flowers that sits down in the centre. Aechmeas usually have a spike of flowers that extend beyond the (usually) green foliage, and the flowers can be all shades of the rainbow. You'll notice I said 'usually' alot, because its ain't always necessarily so!
There are a few good books about, but by far the best tool we have is the internet. If you try googling the genus names, and choosing to view the images, you will get a bit of an idea of what they look like, and there are quite a few more web sites with forums devoted to bromeliads. There are even some on Facebook! http://fcbs.org/pictures.htm
and this link takes you to the FCBS photo index, where you can look up photos of plants. Very handy if you're trying to ID things.
Jen, wheres the pics?
Karen, i love our new Till. Is it a fragrance like cloves? I do like it when a brom has a fragrance. I got T. crocata today, but don't know if it will smell. i didn't think to ask.
Colleen, is that Bill. 'Hallelujah'? Nicely grown!
My camera hs flat batteries, and its getting late, but I promise i will post a pic or two tomorrow!
Sue
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 21, 2011
5:12 AM

Post #8577127

Hi Sue. Yes that's him. The pic was taken back in January but I was very taken by it. The mum has grown 2 pups they are nearly as big as her now and I've taken them off and repotted them. Lovely coloured plant I think. Colleen
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 21, 2011
1:29 PM

Post #8577848

Welcome Springer. :) I'm thinking your friends must have something in their water that the rest of us don't. Whether they're putting it on the plants or drinking it is irrelevant, as it gives the same effect. I want some! hehehe

It sounds like a few of you a good time yesterday, adding to the brom collections. Nice pick-up Karen with the pimiento. I was given one once when I went to visit a grower with a 'friend'. A plant was handed to her that had 2 good sized pups, with one supposed to be mine, but I guess she needed it more than I did. lol It's probably been better looked after than I'd have done anyway, so that's one consolation. Until I do a serious clear-out of multiple plants and pups I really don't have room for any more broms anyway ... until I see something I have to have I guess.

Sue, I wish flat batteries was my biggest problem with the camera. After we had the episode with the snake a week or so ago I put it down somewhere, and haven't been able to find it again since. I'm putting it down to the stress. hehe
Pam



splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 21, 2011
3:48 PM

Post #8578056

Good morning everyone,

Gee springer you sure brought everyone out of the woodwork. It's been a bit quiet her lately and I was beginning to think the girls had all left town, but it's great to see them all here and posting again.

Firstly to answer your question about the flowering cycle of brom's. None of my plants have ever flowered more than once. To my knowledge bromeliads are monocarpic and they only flower once. (Is that the word you were looking for Colleen?) But to cover all the bases, there is still a lot we don't know about them and indeed there are new species being discovered all the time, and knowing how often Mother Nature can do something different, who knows if this rule applies to "all brom's" everywhere.

There are exceptions to all rules and an example of this is when a plant will put out a pup which is completely different in colour or form to any of the previous pups or the mother herself. This is called a "sport" and although it doesn't happen all the time, it does happen occasionally. I guess what I'm saying is that we can't honestly say that "all" broms are monocarpic as it could be an occasional thing for it to flower more than once but not commonly known.

Colleen, your Billbergia Hallelujah is a beautiful plant and one of my all time favourite brom's. If the pups are not removed and it is allowed to clump up, it quickly makes a truly magnificent specimen. It can also be quite variable and it's colour can be greatly influenced by the amount and type of fertilizer it is given.

If a fertilizer is too high in Nitrogen it will cause the colour to become more green and although not quite as attractive as the usual colours, the green with large white spotting and a few streaks of maroon here and there is also quite eyecatching as well. I have also seen plants where the Potassium had been increased which gave it the appearace of being more white than any other colour which is another attractive option. On top of all this it is a very reliable grower which pups much easier than many of the other hybrids in this genus.

In regard sources for information, there is an excellent little book published by the Queensland Bromeliad Society which is very reasonably priced as well. It is not "flashy" and has only line drawings without any pictures, but it has every bit of information that any bromeliad grower could ever want, and what's more it's in easy to understand format without all the"technical stuff". It has proved so popular since its initial publication it is now sold in many other countries besides Australia. If you were to contact Lynn Hudson from the Cairns Bromeliad Society I'm sure she could tell you where to get it.

As Sue says, there are some wonderful sites on the www with unlimited knowledge. There are also some very good forums which deal only with bromeliads, but you need to be careful there as in imported books, as a lot of the information given is for climatic conditions in other countries and doesn't apply to Australia. Probably one of the most appropriatet places to learn is to join a Bromeliad Society or Study Group in your local area, fortunately Cairns has such a Bromeliad Society, just waiting for you.

Finally you asked if brom's can be grown from seed. The short answer is yes, but although it is an interesting and most rewarding aspect of brom growing, it can, and often does lead to "terminal bromeliaditis" which as we all know is a complication of bromeliad collecting. Once it reaches this stage there is no known cure and one is confined to spending every spare minute of the day amongst the seedlings which seemingly appear to be taking over everything.

All the best Nev.

splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 21, 2011
3:51 PM

Post #8578058

I Meant to attach this to the previous message as an example of "Terminal Bromeliaditist"

All the best, Nev


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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 21, 2011
4:16 PM

Post #8578099

Nev, at least I have a name now for the affliction that seems to be affecting Wendy and me, especially since Wendy got hold of your great little book. Chinese containers with hairy little things in them seem to be popping up everywhere. Springer, I know many bromeliad fans will disagree with this but I found Ebay one of the best ways to learn how to identify different broms at first. You don't need to be a member and you have to bear in mind that sometimes the photos and spelling can be misleading or even downright wrong. I'm no expert but I found that just browsing through the ones for sale helped me to differentiate the genuses (genera?) and gave me an idea of what some of the ones in my garden might be. The FCBS site is wonderful but it can be overwhelming if you don't know where to start. Lovely Billbergia, Colleen. Hate to tell you Colleen but I've think you've definitely moved from novice to fullblown addict. Jen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 21, 2011
5:12 PM

Post #8578181

Hi everyone.

Sue, I wouldn't have thought to call the perfume of Till. caerulea as cloves. It is quite unusual though, and really strong for the size of the tiny flower. I have crocata but it hasn't flowered yet. I think there are different variations of crocata. I got quite a few tills yesterday but only the one in flower.

Here is the neo. pemiento. It is still just a baby, but they had the mother plant on display, and oh wow oh wow oh wow!!!

Karen

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 21, 2011
7:01 PM

Post #8578396

Till. caerulea easy to manage and a pretty fast grower for a Tillandsia. It will quickly form into a nice clump which can perfume the whole shade house when in bloom.

All the best, Nev.


Till. caerulea

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 21, 2011
8:54 PM

Post #8578585

Oh, I want mine to look like that! Now!!!

Karen
Another pic of my lone little plant...

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perke_patch

May 21, 2011
11:31 PM

Post #8578727

this is one of my new tills purchased at Peter Tristram's yesterday. It is ionantha chestnut, one of the larger forms of ionantha so this one has a bit of growing to do.

Wendy

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perke_patch

May 21, 2011
11:46 PM

Post #8578731

I wanted one of these but couldn't have it so I'll have to grow one myself. pity I don't have either of the 2 parents though. It's neo jenna x tunisia. Nev do you have those and how long would it take you to make me one. LOL
Is Peter on this forum I wonder? If he is I'm letting him know I will haunt him until he sends me one. I'll be backkkkkkkk.

Wendy

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 21, 2011
11:53 PM

Post #8578736

Hi Everyone,
thanks so much for all the welcomes and all the comments, advice and ideas. I will cut and paste a lot of the things you have all written into a word document so i don't lose your valuable words.
Okay so of the two friends who claim to have broms that have flowered more than once... one is just stubborn and the other has decided that perhaps it was a pup the following year that flowered not the original, lol. Quite funny I thought how they were both so adamant that they had some that flowered every year.
Today was a funny day, now I have my area listed as Cairns, but Cairns is the closest big town to me, I am about 2 hours north of Cairns... but anyway, we went to Cairns today to get a kitchen hutch we picked up from a buy sell swap site on Facebook, and low and behold they had a clay pot full of broms, lol, so that came home with us too :)
Another new one that we don't have, so I am quite excited about that and it's loaded with new pups too, so it was a nice pick up. the hutch is nice too, lol. Now going off what you wrote Sue, (thank you I have saved it to my word doc) I think it must be a Neoregelias, which one I have no idea, but it's a start. I'll try to work out how to attach a photo for you :)
I will try to find out about the brom society in Cairns, I did see it has a website, but it doesn't look too active, and being a couple of hours north of cairns might make it a bit hard, but i will endeavor to find out, thanks Nev.
I think we are brom mad already, in the last few months we have collected more than I can count right now, ripped all our old gardens out and have sat pots of broms all through them. We do not own the property, it belongs to my father in law, so we are lucky to be able to change garden etc, but we don't want to plant all our nice broms in case we move.
Ok the whole seed thing... i would dearly love to know how to get seeds, how to grow seeds and have baby broms all over the place, lol.
We have been into desert roses for about 5 years... and we have baby desert roses and we love watching them grow into beautiful plants ... but then we found broms!!! We are slowly selling and giving away all the desert roses, well keeping our favourites, but broms are our passion now and I would love to grow them from seeds.
Nev that book you talked about, will that teach me about seeds? Do all flowers have seeds? So many questions about seeds that I would love to blurt out and beg for answers too, lol, but I will reframe...just. LOL.
I gather that Nev you are very experienced with broms? Would you be able to teach me about seeds, collecting and growing them?
Does anyone have any seeds they would be willing to sell so i can have a go at growing my very own baby brom? I wish I had so many more, can't wait to get more...
Oh my name is Tash sorry I didn't give my name before :)
If it works, this is the broms we got today



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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 21, 2011
11:58 PM

Post #8578746

ya my photo worked :)
So I decided to attach another photo, this is of one that we have not seen before but was one of the ones we got that were left behind at a rental and the owner was going to throw them all away, so we managed to get them.
We really love this brom, we've had it about 2 months now, not sure if it should be in the sun or shade, not sure of it's age, but it seems very slow growing, no sign of any pups on it yet either, yet nearly all of our others give pups quite regularly. Any ideas as to what it might be? It's leaves are kind of leathery, no prickles on them either. Thought i would share it with you all
Tash

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perke_patch

May 22, 2011
12:10 AM

Post #8578763

welcome Tash. that's a nice looking brom you scored today. well done.

Jen Peter tristram shared some seeds with us especially the tills that had already burst and sent fluffy seeds everywhere. He said we could have some so we did. BUT I know I got more than one type and just put them all together in my hand so it will be a surprise when they start growing and turn out different. I almost can't wait to get home to mount them on something. At the moment they are in a dish on the back window in the motorhome. The rest of my new babies are holidaying with Aunty Sue till we head back north again.

We are staying here until Tuesday then heading to Port Macquarie to see Jack. Should be ready to visit him about Thursday. BUT first we need to find a BCF and buy some more reels after the 2nd one flew to bits today. what a bunch of lemons they were and not just the cheapest ones there either. Quite disappointed. Wonder what Johnny will want to do tomorrow now. Perhaps I can talk him into coming back to see Peter hmmmmm.

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perke_patch

May 22, 2011
12:15 AM

Post #8578765

Tash that last photo is a vrisea, possibly splenriet but you will have to wait for the flower to see if it is single bract or multi bract and what colour. It definately needs shade and only gives a couple of pups when ready to flower.

I forgot to say that last photo is of a group of Peter Tristrams hybrids all from the same batch of seedlings. look at the colours.

Wendy

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 22, 2011
12:19 AM

Post #8578768

Oh wow, so are the seeds fluffy? Are they like a desert rose with fluffy bits? Ohhhh now you are teasing me, lol. I'm going to go google broms seeds to see if i can find a photo of what they even look like, lol.
I can't wait to learn about seeds and grow some. I would like to learn about the little tiny broms too, the ones...like i think it was Nev and Karen put up? Are they the Tillandsia? Never knew they were even a brom (red faced)
sounds like you all have such wonderful plants
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
1:05 AM

Post #8578778

Tash, I can't believe how enthusiastic you are! Its good to see. Some seeds are like the Desert Rose (Adenium) seeds, fluffy. Some produce a berry that, when you squeeze it, small hard seeds come out. Your pot of Pink Neoregelias looks like a good score! Nev is the man with the seed sowing tips, so maybe he will send you a Dmail with the info on it. I'm a bit slack when it comes to writing a long post.
Karen, your N. 'Pemiento' will be a stunning plant. I had it on my wishlist for ages, but then I got a N. 'Kahala dawn' and figured they are similar enough. Mind you, if I came accross one at a special price, I would probably purchase it.
Wendy, I didn't see you snafoo that Tillandsia! Belinda and I must've been looking at other things. So much to see and never enought time. So, did you count how many plants were in that box? he he.
Pam, too many bromeliads? No such thing! Pity about your friend not being forthcoming with the second plant. And did i miss something with a snake? Sounds ssssserious!
Tash's comments about starting with Adeniums reminds me that I kinda started out collecting Succulents. What did every one else collect (if anything) or did you always start with broms?
Jen, I agree with using Ebay as a tool for Identifying broms, like you said, they're not always right, but then you can cross reference them on the fcbs site. Bearing in mind that when they are grown under different conditions, they might not look exactly the same. Its also good for seeing whats out there, and opens your eyes to a whoole new world of broms!
This is Tillandsia Duratii var saxatilis. I mounted it on an upsidedown, cone shaped, hanging basket and tied nylon fishing line underneath (like a net) to support the bottom. This is a new one for me, and I really hope I don't kill it!
Sue

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
1:07 AM

Post #8578779

My Tillandsia seleriana didn't survive the position I gave it, so I'm on the lookout for another.

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 22, 2011
1:25 AM

Post #8578787

oh wow, just saw your other message Wendy, thanks for the name, I headed over to that link for the all the broms, and looked up the name you gave and yes it does look like it, wow, thanks so much, now we know what it is :) Can't wait for the flower...but actually yes i can... cause don't want my plant to die ;)
thanks Sue for the info on the seeds, one brom we scored had funny berries, (must of been it's flowers) and I did squeeze those tiny little seeds out (all excited, lol) I think I kept them on the lid of a container, would they grow? or should I of done a certain something with them? Have to look and see if I still have them, lol. Might not. So do all flowers have seeds? going to go google, got side tracked before by hubby. He is just as keen on the broms as me and regularly manages to bring another one home from a garden, as he builds pools and often he can ask the owner and they are happy to share :) So he'd like you all to know he is reading and getting me to add his 2 cents worth too, lol :)
Tash
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 22, 2011
1:26 AM

Post #8578788

Tash, if you look back to Wendy's photos (Perke_patch) on 13 May you can see her Neo seeds just starting to shoot. Jen

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 22, 2011
1:37 AM

Post #8578790

seriously couldn't help myself, just went to ebay and brought one packet of the only seeds I could find, lol, it says they come with instructions... we'll see what happens, hurry up mr postman :)

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 22, 2011
1:49 AM

Post #8578792

oh thanks Jen, I just went back up and had a look, wow wee, can't wait to have some of them... come on mr postman!!! don't care what they are, just want to grow them :)
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 22, 2011
3:18 AM

Post #8578827

weed_woman wrote:

Pam,... did i miss something with a snake? Sounds ssssserious!



Got up from posting a message here at Daves, Sue. The computer is right beside a window, the sill of which is about head height. I heard what I figured was a fly buzzing at the window and absent-mindedly glanced around to see what turned out to be a 2 metre snake on the window sill, on the inside. It must have been just a few inches away when I was sitting down.

I'd thought correctly that was probably just a tree snake, but didn't want our two little dogs getting too it too excited, so managed to lure them out with the promise of a treat, then used a board to block in in the room, and spent the best part of 2 stressful hours waiting for the snake catcher, when it should have only taken him 20 minutes - he'd gotten lost twice. I was just pleased neither of our two grandbabies was home at the time
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 22, 2011
7:11 AM

Post #8579201

Been a busy board today. Pam, that would have scared me to pieces. I do not like snakes at the best of times, let alone having one in the house.

Wendy, seems you are having a great time on your trip. Some good finds too, by the look of it. I only recently learned that there were a few varieties of ionantha so will be on the lookout for other varieties now too. I did pick up a new one yesterday, small and red. Photo below, Ionantha fuega.

Tash, it will be fun to follow you on your brom journey. Tillandsias are in the bromeliad family, but are the true "air plants". I love them, as they don't take up much room and there is such a large variety of them. They too can multiply by ofsetting pups, or can be grown from seed, and crossed to make new varieties. Just like broms.

Sue, I am hoping mine are going to survive the position I have them in. I've been told they can survive full sun, especially the silvery leaf ones. But it will be trial and error, until I learn more.

Karen

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
1:28 PM

Post #8579859

Hi everyone,
Springer, I’m afraid you have the worst case of “acute” bromeliaditis that I have ever seen which is obvious from the unmistakeable symptom of wanting to rush in and do everything all at once. Take some advice from someone who’s” been there and done that”. Stop! Look! and Listen! to the advice of others before you do things and it may save you from wasting time and making expensive mistakes that many of us other growers have made by doing things in haste.

To give you an example of what I’m talking about, you say you bought some seed off EBay. Well so did I ... I was so attracted to the picture of the flower and the fact that it was another new brom I didn’t have nor had I ever heard of. Well I got the seeds, planted them and tended the babies and only after that did I decide to find out more about it and much to my surprise below is the description. Take note of the “Growth Habits”:

Frost Tolerance: Hardy to 28°F (-2°C) for short periods
Sun Exposure: Full sun to light shade
Origin: Tropical Americas, Caribbean
Growth Habits: Clumping rosette, 4 feet tall (1.2 m), up to 10 feet wide (3 m)
Watering Needs: Regular to abundant water in summer, keep dry in winter
Propagation: Offsets, seeds.

It has the most “deadly” thorns I have even seen and they are so dangerous these plants have been used in their country of origin in the past as fences to keep cattle in and even around gaol fences to stop escaping criminals. Where do you grow such a plant that is 4 feet high and 10 feet wide in a suburban backyard?

You first picture you posted looks to me like Neoregelia Pink Sensation. It is a beautiful plant when well grown, however the one you have appears to have pups which are deformed due to overcrowding because they weren’t taken off soon enough. If it was my plant, I would remove the pups and plant each one in their own pot, the leaves may still straighten out with a little help by manipulation from you.

As Wendy says the other plant is possibly Vriesea Splendriet which has been bred from the species Vr. splendens. It is the one most commonly seen and sold in large stores and nurseries and if this ID is correct, it will have a single “flame” coloured paddle a couple of feet high when it flowers. Be warned though, some of them can be cold sensitive.

Now as for growing brom’s from seeds, I would say tread carefully as this is probably the easiest area to waste valuable time due to impatience. Carefully select what you are to grow and read all you can about them first. If you grow them through to maturity and they all turn out to be “duds” you have wasted four or five years of valuable growing time and bench space which could have been used to grow something useful. As for hybrids and cross pollinating different plants, well this is a very involved process which also requires plenty of study to select the parents with the best potential and I would say, “don’t rush in”.

On the other hand some plants just develop seeds normally having been wild pollinated by birds, ants and other insects. If you just want a bit of fun, grow some of these as it’s like a lottery, you don’t know what you can get. You may just get the “good one”, but you can be sure you will get a lot of rubbish also, but the journey and anticipation is well worth the trouble.

If you would like to Email me (and this invitation is for all of you other members as well), I can Email you a little booklet I once wrote on growing bromeliads from seed. It is in a very basic, easy to understand format with lots of pictures and I feel it will answer a lot of your questions. It describes a simple method I have used and which I know works.

Gee, I have raved on again haven’t I, but then you started me off by asking questions so I don’t take all the blame.

All the best, Nev.

Neoregelia Pink Sensation

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
1:39 PM

Post #8579888

Hi again,

Disclaimer: I must tell you that neither the above plant nor the picture is mine, it was a picture I had sent to me and the copyright which Dave's Garden has attached to it is not correct either,as I can't claim the credit for it. I use it simply for ID purposes.

All the best, Nev.

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 22, 2011
2:30 PM

Post #8580035

Hi Nev, thanks so much for your reply, yup I sure am eager to get started and I will take your advice and slow down :)
the seeds I have ordered are similar to our favourite one, (well it looks similar) they are Vrisesa Hieroglyphica. (king of broms). They look quite nice, and yes from what I read will take some years to mature. Do you think these would be an ok brom to start trying to grow or would you advise me not to start here? They were only $8 so if i have made a mistake at least you have caught me early and I will tread more carefully in future. wow your first ones sound very scary indeed.
I would love you book Nev, very much. Thank you so much for the offer, you are too kind, I will send you a message now :)
Yes that brom we got yesterday is very overcrowded and that will be my first job this morning, to split it all up and repot them all, I think when I looked at it yesterday (it pulls right out of it's pot that it's in, no dirt no nothing, just roots - it's basically just sitting in the pot very loosely) it looks like 3 large plants and each has about 2 very pale white pups coming up still closed up though, they aren't big enough to have started to open up so they really do need sorting out. Plus it's been in a really deep clay pot, so the pups have to grow so far to reach the light. It's my first thing to do this morning. i'll try to take a photo once i have repotted them :)
I won't badger you on seeds cause I guess I am being to eager, so I will do some reading and go from there :)
Thank you all so very very much I am loving all the info and the photos you all post of your beautiful broms.
thanks heaps
Tash
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
4:44 PM

Post #8580257

Hi Tash,

Vr hieroglyphica is certainly reasonably easy to grow, it's one of the four I started with and if I can do anyone can. Although it's a little slower than some of the other seeds, it does teach you the rewards of patience as they are beautiful brom's and also very easy to get rid of as they "sell themselves". Even though it's a hobby, a litle bit of money is always handy to buy medication (more brom's) for your "bromeliaditis".

All the best, Nev.

A few of the hieroglyphica seedlings in 3" pots


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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
6:45 PM

Post #8580514

Hi everyone,

One of my Billbergia Hallelujah plants which has been allowed to clump up.

All the best, Nev.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
6:53 PM

Post #8580546

Also an example of Bill. Hallelujah when it has had a fertilizer with too much Nitrogen. Personally I find it rather attractive but then everyone has their own tastes.

All the best, Nev.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
7:03 PM

Post #8580574

Also a Billbergia Hallelujah plant given extra Potassium to enhance the white.

All the best, Nev.



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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 22, 2011
7:05 PM

Post #8580578

They are lovely Nev, oh and the ones in the background too. I am reading your booklet, only on page 9 but it's fantastic, thanks so much.
Tash
PS I have finished it now and it is fantastic, you have answered so many of my questions and I was shocked at how long they take to grow, but still so excited about giving it ago myself, thanks so much :)

This message was edited May 22, 2011 7:29 PM
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 22, 2011
7:11 PM

Post #8580611

Finally a plant of Vr. Splendriet showing just what it is capable of.

Nine months previously this plant had been badly damaged and had numerous brown leaves due to cold damage.

I think this cold stress fooled the plant into thinking it was going to die, as it put up three pups and each one flowered in one last effort to reproduce itself i.e. by pups and by seed, Isn't nature amazing?

All the best, Nev.


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perke_patch

May 22, 2011
11:33 PM

Post #8580946

Tash now that you have Nev's book you will be as experienced as Jen and me soon. We got 'THE BOOK' only a couple months ago and immediately spent an afternoon in my garden plucking centres out of neos trying to find ripe seed. Hence the seeds you saw on this forum page.
The first thing you need to learn is what is a hybrid and what is a species. The first lot of seeds my husband grew a couple years ago (before I got involved with them) were from our favourite neo painted delight. We were dismayed when none of them came out looking like the mother. We didn't understand that it is a hybrid so seeds can throw back to anything in the parentage.
He also grew seeds from kautskyi which is a species so we did get true kautskyi seedlings. Some even looked better than the mother so we are trying to grow some seeds from these improved ones.
We were also given some seeds from Vr hieroglyphica, and alcantarea black form imperialis and braziliana. Luckily we sowed all the hieroglyphica and half the black imperialis but held onto half the imperialis and all the braziliana for too long just in plastic bags. We didn't know to keep them in the fridge and they just went mouldy and wouldn't grow. What a waste especially the black imperialis seeds because they don't grow pups and the only way to grow them is from seed. We totally wasted valuable seed. We just didn't know what we were doing.
The one thing I can advise is to find a mentor who can teach you but even then you can't take in all that they tell you and will still make mistakes. Hopefully you won't make big mistakes like some of ours. Go to visit other growers and listen to any advise they give you. Take notes whenever possible and you can refer back to it over and over as you learn. Oh and don't depend on the people you buy plants from having the correct name on them. We grew lambert's pride for years and had so many pups in the yard before we found out they were actually maggie's pride. We had to go around looking for them all to rename them and still find the odd one with wrong name. So look on FCBS and compare what you have bought with what it should look like and if in doubt post a photo and ask fellow forum brom addicts for advice.

Wendy
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 22, 2011
11:39 PM

Post #8580949

Nev I love all of your Bil. Hallelujahs, but the original in a group is spectacular. I should have seen that before I took my pups off. Never mind hopefully she will have many more pups. Lovely lot of chatting going on in here. Colleen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 23, 2011
12:24 AM

Post #8580983

Hi everyone,

Wendy, on reading the early problem you had losing half the imperialis and all the braziliana seed in plastic bags which you suspect was caused by not putting it in the fridge. I think the problem may have been that the seed wasn't perfectly dry. That plus being in a plastic bag provided just the right amount of humidity to create the perfect conditions for mould to grow.

I have always kept my seed in little paper envelopes and never plastic for this reason. I know some of the professionals sell their seed in small plastic bags, but that seed is thoroughly dried first that's why they don't have problems with mould.

I put all my seed in these litle paper envelopes and put them inside a plastic take away food container with a little bit of silica gel or other dessicant to absorb any possible moisture and keep them in the bottom of the fridge.

All the best, Nev.



DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 23, 2011
1:59 PM

Post #8582453

Nev, those Hallelujahs are gorgeous. I have one that was beautifully coloured when I got it, but has gone green where it was red now.

Wendy, I think you learn more from mistakes in the long run. Can you (or anyone) please enlighten me, what is FCBS and where do I find it, please?

Karen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 23, 2011
4:18 PM

Post #8582703

Hi everyone.

Karen, if you haven't recently given your Hallelujah a fertilize with a high nitrogen fertilizer, I suspct its loss of clour is due to insuficient light. You do need very good light to bring out the colours. Mine is growing beneath 75% beige coloured shadecloth in a north facing aspect which isn't shaded by trees or other buildings. In other words it get this good light all day. Having said that, I don't mean full direct sun which would surely burn them in summer.

The FCBS is a bromeliad encyclopedia of the Florida Council of Bromeliad Societies. "http://fcbs.org/" It is a free site and has lots of information as well as a fantastic Photo Index which has thousands of bromeliad pictures of all the various genera. It's really a fantastic site and a wealth of information.

Another site you may also like to visit is the BCR which is the Bromeliad Cultivar Registry and run by Bromeliad Society International "http://botu07.bio.uu.nl/bcg/bcr/index.php" It shows photos and info of all registered bromeliad plants.

All the best, Nev.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 23, 2011
5:52 PM

Post #8582903

Nev, you are a mine of information. Thank you. I expect I shall "get lost" in those links for quite some time.

I thought the lack of light might be the problem. It lost colour so quickly. But still a good looking plant. Won't get much light now until summer returns.

Karen
perke_patch

May 24, 2011
2:27 AM

Post #8583633

Hi. We have several pots of hallelujah growing in full sun facing north. this brings out wonderful colours in them. we have several other pots growing in different spots but we always put them in the sun for colour before we put them out for sale.

Wendy
77sunset
Merino
Australia

May 24, 2011
2:33 PM

Post #8584797

I have been reading about all your B. Helleujahs with interest. I bought a couple 2 years ago and they went very greenish when in the shadehouse. Now I have all the broms in the greenhouse I am hoping they will turn back to the lovely chocolate red color. The greenhouse is where it gets sun all day and much more light than the shadehouse.
As our weather over the past year had been rather dull , this may not have helped either.
The broms seem to like their new house and I have lots of pups starting. I did read in some posts that the mother will flower then produc epups. Some of the broms I have bought, have not flowered for me but are putting out pups. Was I sold mother plants that flowered before I bought them ? I bought all as pups. One I can think of offhand is Hannibal Lector who has a lovely half grown pup but never flowered.
I have a quite large A. Compacta which I bought 2 years ago. It never flowered but has 2 large pups , one of which , also hasnt flowered but has a pup of its own,. Is this usual with broms. ?
I didnt move my tillandsias to the greenhouse as I think they are all doing so well in their place in the orchid house. They get lots of light and much more air movement than they would in the greenhouse.
I think I may need another one or two . lol.
Jean.
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 24, 2011
5:35 PM

Post #8585162

Hi everyone

Jean, I have bromeliads that regularly pup before and after they flower. The belief that all brom's need to flower before they will pup, is a fallacy. True a lot don't pup until after they flower, but there are also a lot that pup before they flower as well as the ones that sometimes pup before and after they flower. So it doesn't necessarily mean you were sold mother plants that had flowered before you bought them

I had a Vriesea Phillipo-cobergii which produced in excess of eight pups and never flowered. When I asked other growers the reason I was told that I shouldn't be removing the pups, and I must let it "clump up" before it will flower. I didn't take of any more pups off and it produced two more pups which I let grow. When they were about three quarters the size of the mother plant, guess what? It flowered.

The following year though, three of the pups I had previously removed from the same mother plant flowered also, and they had produced no pups. So I think it's something that can just vary between plants. There is a long explanation describing what triggers a brom to flower but I won't go into that, as the short answer to your question is "yes, they can and do pup before they flower"

I also have a Vriesea fosteriana that has given me three pups before flowering, and other fosterianas which haven't pupped until after they flowered, and Hannibal Lector regularly produces several pups for me before it flowers.

All the best, Nev.
77sunset
Merino
Australia

May 24, 2011
6:29 PM

Post #8585279

Thanks Nev. I will now not worry about what they are doing. I can just enjoy looking at them. I think they have all grown since I moved them into the greenhouse with more light. The melaleuca tree was shading their old house a bit much , I think.
I have a flower stem on a large plain green noid. It looks like the ' matchstick' brom flower stem.
Jean.

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 24, 2011
10:47 PM

Post #8585695

Hi Everyone,
I am loving all the information. Thanks to Nev's excellent book, I now know a whole lot more than I did a couple of days ago about seeds. But I have yet another question... my neighbors have broms that have flowers on them at the moment, some are getting quite old (the flowers) how do I tell if they have seeds in them? They are ones that have a flower spike, ... how to explain what they look like? Oh if you scroll up, like the flowers on Nev's Vr. Splendriet, they are not that species, but the flowers look similar. Is there an easy way to tell if there are seeds that I can get? My neighbors don't mind if i take the flowers, but I don't want to if there is no point. They will otherwise just leave the flowers on until they totally die and then cut them off.
thanks heaps and sorry for all the questions
Tash
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 25, 2011
1:30 PM

Post #8586849

Good morning everyone,

Tash, the seed from a "Vriesea" which is the name of the genera you are asking about, is different to those of Neoregelias which are the ones in the pictures in my little book. The easiest way to tell if there is seed there is to wait until the flowers die and the flower spike goes brown and feels and looks like brown paper.

It will take vriesea seed anywhere between 6 and 12 months to ripen, and when it is ripe, the capsule will turn brown and split open. The seeds look like the ones in the attached picture and are of the type that are usually distributed by the wind.

If you want to make sure the seeds aren't lost to the wind, tie the leg of a nylon stocking loosely over the flower spike. This still allows air circulation around it but will capture the seed when the capsule bursts.

All the best, Nev.

Thumbnail by splinter1804
Click the image for an enlarged view.

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 25, 2011
2:19 PM

Post #8586922

wow thanks Nev, I'll cut and paste that info to my notes, you are just a wealth of information. So just to make sure I have it right, when you say to wait until the flower spike dies... do you let it die on the plant or should it be cut off before it dies? Also if you can cut it off, when is too early to cut it off? I have a few of those big orange coloured broms, I think you called them Aechmea blanchetianas, and one had a big flower spike. I left it there for about a month or two (now this was before I knew they only flower once) and I then decided the brom was looking a bit worse for wear, so I cut it off. Not sure if I still have it or not now though, hubby just did a clean up of palm fronds etc yesterday and it might of been taken with the palm rubbish. How long should I have left it on the brom, did I do the wrong thing cutting it off.
My neighbor has said i can have the flowers off a couple of her broms, but when do I take them off is what I am basically asking :)
Is this stuff about seeds is just so amazing to me.
Thanks so much Tash
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 25, 2011
2:24 PM

Post #8586931

Nev, may I have a copy of your Ebook please? My areococchus that I missed seeing flowering is at least setting some berries, and it seems a shame to let them go to waste.

There are a few broms that won't flower if pups are removed Jean so it's always best to check if unsure. I think from memory Hohenbergia correia-araujoi is one of them. I'd removed 3 or 4 pups before I remembered that I'd been told this. Sure enough, once it had clumped up a bit it sent up a flower spike for me.

Pam
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 25, 2011
3:04 PM

Post #8587008

Some time ago I got a copy of a CD by Derek Butcher, all on tillandsias. It is probably more than I will ever need, and I haven't hardly begun to get through it yet, but though there is some text, most of it is pictures and drawings of plants and flowers for ID purposes. I don't have one on bromeliads, though somewhere around here is a really lovely book full of pictures and some information about them, which I've had for about 20 years. It isn't a guide for growing, just an intro to broms, but very lovely. Must find it again. At least I know what room it is in.

The wind knocked over some of my broms yesterday, so have just been out straightening them up. No damages thank goodness.

Karen
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
12:15 AM

Post #8587780

Hi all. Karen, I'm in the same boat with the wind! I knew it was coming so thought I'd done my best to batten down the hatches, but still some went down side up. Theres been some rather large gum branches coming down too, but nothing has trashed any broms so far! fingers crossed. But one branch did knock down some of Leisas orchids, and I'll have to repot them once the wind has died down, and I can safely get in under the trees to pick them up. I think I need an orchid house now.
Tash, its best to leave the Vriesea flower stalks on until the pods are full. If you feel along the 'paddle' shaped inflorescence, once the flowers have stopped blooming, you might be able to feel a small swelling, which is the forming seed capsule/pod. Most eventually emerge at the end of where the flower protruded, and are at first green, then dry to a brown. Once they are dry and brown you can cut them off. This can take up to 12 months, as Nev said. Unfortunately they are not all that attractive during that time, unless, like me you are eagerly awaiting seed, then they are just gorgeous! With the Aechmea blanchettianas, you would notice after flowering that the plant produces berries. Once they have reached a good size, the fertile ones usually change colour (not familiar with blanchettianas berry colour) and you can check for seed by squeezing them out. I don't think the seed will continue to ripen if you cut them off too early, but I'm not 100% sure.
Pam, I did not know that about Ho. correia-araujoi. I bought one in flower some years ago, and have split the clump up and into different parts of the yard. They are doing ok, but haven't seen a flower yet. They seem a little slow to mature, compared to the fast neos and Aechmeas. If you have any spare seed of your Araeococcus, I wouldn't mind having a go. I can probably swap you some seed from other things.
Does anyone have any info on Acanthostchys seed? It seems ages ago that the plant flowered, but I haven't found any seed yet. Does it get a berry or a dry capsule? I've grown some from seed that was given to me, and they are very easy. If I get seed, I am happy to share it around.
Anyway, I have a garden club coming to visit next monday, so the pressure is on to have the place looking tidy, so if mother nature could just play along, and drop the wind to a gentle breeze, and keep the sun shining so i can mow the lawns this weekend, I would be very gratefull!
Keep chatting, and we'll start a new thread on the 1st of june.
Sue
Neo. 'Gunpowder'

This message was edited May 28, 2011 8:45 PM

Thumbnail by weed_woman
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perke_patch

May 26, 2011
2:57 AM

Post #8587808

Sue we intend to head back north tomorrow when we check out of here. We should be back in Coffs by the weekend. If you need a bit of help on Monday I am happy to help out. Let me know. You can show all our new babies from Jack as well as the ones from Peter. LOL.

Johnny was impressed with Jack's set up. I have never seen so many seedlings in one - no two places. His place in Port had so many seedlings. It was amazing to see. then when we went out to Lake Innes drive there were even more trays of seedlings growing. what an amazing set up. I'd love to go back again for some more but feel like I scored so many of his babies today. talk about eye candy and drool material. anyone coming to Port Macquarie should definately go to see Jack. We now have lots of new parent plants for hybridising. can't wait to get home to see what is flowering so we can get started. Pity we just have to wait for plants to flower though.
Wish we had a few more growers close by so we could share flowers. Jen what do you have flowering now???? Karen how about your plants? any flowering? who else is close enough to share pollen???? I will happily share seeds if we share pollen.

Wendy
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

May 26, 2011
3:37 AM

Post #8587828

Wendy, no flowers here, I'm afraid. Sounds like you are having a very productive trip. Have fun.

Karen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
12:50 PM

Post #8588838

Hi everyone,

As I'm just a bromeliad grower and not really familiar with a lot of other flowers, can someone please tell me what are areococchus?

I typed it into Google and they have nothing of that spelling only for "Aerococcus" which is a urinary tract infection the definition is shown below and I don't think this is what we're talking about ????

A genus of aerobic Gram-positive cocci that resemble enterococci but do not form chains. They are frequently isolated as airborne saphrophytes in hospitals and as a pathogen of lobsters; cause greening in blood agar and grow in the presence of 40% bile. In humans, they are found in endocarditis and in urinary tract infections. The type and only species is Aerococcus viridans.

Origin: aero-+ G. Kokkos, berry

Tash - Don't cut of the flower spikes until after you have taken the seed. As Sue says they look unsightly to some at this stage, but to seed collectors they look beautiful. "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" As for the ones you have already cut off, unless the seed was ripe you can forget about them as they won't continue to ripen once removed from the plant as far as I know.

Pam - Yes, you or anyone else can have a copy, they are there for the askng. As I'm only new to this forum myself and still finding my way, can anyone tell me if there' any way to attach a document to a Dave's Garden message, or only pic's? I tried once before and got a message to say it was in the wrong format (PDF)

If I can't attach it, anyone wanting the booklet will need to send me their Email address.

Sue - Acanthostchys seed can be seen in the swollen white coloured capsules (berries) in the old flowers (see pic)
I have grown both types from seed and as you say they are very easy and fast growing. Strobilacea is the most popular of the two types with its small pineapple like cones with yellow flowers while the other, (pitcainioides) has a more insignificant type of mauve/purple flower which grows from the base of the plant. I'll see if I can find any seed and send it along with a small seedling or two of Acanthostachys pitcairniodes if you would like.

All the best, Nev.

splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
12:58 PM

Post #8588854

Oops! I forgot to attach the picture of the acanthostachys berries

All the best, Nev.

Thumbnail by splinter1804
Click the image for an enlarged view.

splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
1:03 PM

Post #8588864

Here's a pic of Acanthostachys pitcairniodes also.

All the best, Nev.

Thumbnail by splinter1804
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 26, 2011
1:11 PM

Post #8588883

I guess I must have spelled it wrong Nev. oops! Araeococcus flagellifolius is what I have ... missed out the 'A'. Oh well, at least Sue knew what I meant, and Sue, of course you're welcome to some of the seed, better to spread the risk anyway. hehehe. I have absolutely no idea of how to tell when they're ready to harvest, so unless someone can tell me otherwise, I guess I will just watch and catch them when they look like they're about to fall.

Those of you who are looking at swapping pollen, I don't know if it's possible for broms, but cannot see any reason why it shouldn't be, but when I was right into growing daylilies (lost most of them when we moved here due to inadequate water at the time) there were people on the email list who regularly used to freeze their pollen, with great success, simply wrapped in tiny pieces of aluminium foil, or some used empty gelatine capsules. Those suckers must be lined with gold though because I priced them and they cost a small fortune. Freezing the pollen meant that they could later pollinate a plant that was flowering at a totally different time to the pollen donor plant.

Sue, I'd love to know how you managed to photograph your Gunpowder. Any time I have tried, the pink turned out terribly washed out. And I've all but given up on trying to photograph purples: if anyone knows the trick, I'd love to hear it.

Will dash off and message you my email address Nev. Many thanks
Pam
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 26, 2011
1:15 PM

Post #8588886

splinter1804 wrote:Here's a pic of Acanthostachys pitcairniodes also.



Now THAT is one nasty looking little sucker. I bet it doesn't get divided or repotted too often. lol

splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
1:28 PM

Post #8588908

Pam - I didn't even know you were talking about a bromeliad when you first wrote Araeococcus, that's why I Googled it.

There's just so many different brom's, I'm learning something new about them every day. I do wish I had started growing them fifty years ago though.

With regards to pollen, have a look at this site:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/bromeliad/msg0414223122243.html?11

All the best, Nev.
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
5:15 PM

Post #8589316

Pam - The trick when dividing these or any other prickly broms, is to take them out of the pot and tip them upside down and divide them by just holding the root ball and not the prickly bit.

All the best, Nev.

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 26, 2011
5:31 PM

Post #8589355

Hi everyone,
this is the only plant forum I am part of and I must say I really do look forward to reading it each day.
Sue I've never seen a Neo "gunpowder" it's beautiful!
Pam I definitely agree with your comments about Nev's nasty looking brom, lol, I looked at it and went ouchhhhhhhh.
Sue and Nev thanks heaps for the further info on the flower and seed scenario, I'm not sure if my neighbor will be willing to leave the flowers on that long, she likes her garden looking all nice and pretty, but I will ask, lol.
I live a an hour to away from the nearest Bunnings, (from any major department stores) and that just puts me on the outer suburbs, the decent shops are about an hour and a half away from me, but my plan is to get down to Cairns this weekend and pick up a few things for my broms. And perhaps try to find a few more broms, lol.
As i have mentioned, we only really got into broms over the last few months, so we have so much to learn, including the right medium to be growing them in, ours I regret to say (embarrassed) are just growing in potting mix, so I'll be working out what they should be in. Lynn Hudson's book seems quite helpful too, especially being up here in the same climate that I'm in. I guess I need to find some "scoria" and some composted bark. Also some peat and perlite, so much to learn.
I think our plants are in too bigger pots and the wrong thing (with it being soil) however, none have died and all seem to be doing well, but obviously they could be maybe doing better in the right mix.
any other tips for things i should have for my broms? (while I'm near the shops on the weekend?)
thanks so much everyone,
Tash
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
6:17 PM

Post #8589482

Sue,

I've had a look for acanthostachys seed, but no luck. I can still send you the Acanth. pitcairniodes plants if you want them though.

All the best, Nev.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 26, 2011
6:18 PM

Post #8589486

Hi Tash. you are in roughly the right area to be able to pick up quincan very cheaply. It would be a perfectly good substitute for scoria. If it's kept moist enough, your broms will even root straight onto bigger chunks of it. You only have to take a look at and around the glasshouse at Flecker gardens to see how much plants love the stuff. I'd dearly love to take a trailer up and bring a load of it back, but convincing hubby how badly we need it might be a problem. lol

Incidentally, the Sunday markets at Smithfield are a great spot to pick up reasonably priced broms and other tropicals.

Pam
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
7:10 PM

Post #8589655

Hi Tash,

A phone call or email to Lynn Hudson could also save you a bit of leg work looking for your surplies, as brom society members always know where to get the best stuff at the best price. (at least they do down here). I could tell you what I grow mine in but it would be absolutely useless for you up there with your different climate.

As a guide, it's good to remember that most of the common bromeliads we see such as Neoregelias, Guzmanias, Vrieseas, Aechmeas etc are all epiphytes in the wild, i.e. they grow on trees. In other words the tree is just something for them to anchor on to, they don't feed from it like a parasite.

The only reason they are mostly in pots is for man's convenience and to give them portability. So bearing this in mind you can now understand that they love air around their roots hence the reason for not putting them in dirt or anything other than a nice open mix which allows good air penetration and prevents water from lying there and causing wet feet.

True some will live in apalling mixes, but that is only because they are great survivors, but given the correct mix or mounted on a tree they will really thrive like this plant of Aechmea recurvata growing on a Peppercorn Tree in my back yard.

Four of the most common mistakes gardeners new to brom growing make are:

Planting in a pot which is too large, planting too deep, planting in a mix that is too dense, and over watering. If not sure whether to water a plant or not, always put it of for another day or two, as long as there's a bit in the centre vase it'll be fine.

All the best, Nev.

Thumbnail by splinter1804
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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 26, 2011
8:10 PM

Post #8589777

Thanks so much Pam and Nev, very helpful information. I have email Lynn but she must be busy as i haven't heard back from her, but i will send her another one today, because if we go right into Cairns itself, I would love to see her garden. (see has offered me to go and have a look).
Pam are you from up here? Yes we got some broms for the Smithfield markets about a month ago, just some minatures as funds were a bit short, but boy there were some beautiful broms there, sometimes not a good thing seeing them, cause then I want them even more, lol. Thanks for the tip about quincan, never heard of it (red faced) but will endeavor to find out :)
Nev thanks so much for the explanation about roots and air, I understand what you mean and so feel I really need to do something as soon as I can to get mine out of the potting mix they are in. Also the pots will be too big too, we are used to big plants need big pots, again something to retrain the brain about in regards to broms.
so for the big Aechmea blanchetianas I have in pots, how big does their pots need to be? I only ask as they are the biggest broms we have, so if i know roughly what size pot they should be in, I know everything else will be much smaller, I hope that makes sense?
thanks heaps,
Tash
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 26, 2011
8:29 PM

Post #8589814

Tash, I have relatives up that way, and usually visit about once a year or so.

Pam

This message was edited May 27, 2011 1:54 PM

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 26, 2011
11:10 PM

Post #8590007

oh ok Pam, so you are a little bit familiar with the area. We live up north of Port Douglas, so we are on the Smithfield side of Cairns but about an hour further north. Up in Sugar Cane country :)
I hope you don't visit in Summer, lol, hot, humid and cyclone, lol.

Oh been trying to find nurseries with Scoria or Quincan, and I found one. so looks like it's Quincan comes in 5,10,15,20-40mm sizes, what size would I be looking at? Also is red scoria ok? That's all they list for scoria, is red scoria and no size on it?
One other thing, is ... I don't know how heavy it is, but would 20kg be a lot or not much at all. It's $5 per 20kg bag unless I can get meterage, but I don't really have the ability to do that at the moment.

Thanks heaps
Tash
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 26, 2011
11:11 PM

Post #8590015

Hi Tash,

I don't have a lot of experience with blanchetianas down here as it seems a bit too cool for their liking. I only have a couple I grew from seed and I keep them in pots just large enough to prevent them from toppling over. Some of my other friends who grow them use them as feature plants and grow them in the garden in full sun. They should do well up there where you live though as a lot of growers up there seem to have them as they like the warmer climate.

Sorry I can't be of more help

All the best, Nev.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 27, 2011
12:17 AM

Post #8590077

20 kg of any stone is not big heaps, Tash, probably the volume of a regular sized bag of potting mix.

>I can get meterage, but I don't really have the ability to do that at the moment.

Does that mean you don't have a trailer or similar? That would make life difficult. I'd be lost without a trailer. Even my potting mix comes by the trailer load. My Aunt goes to the quarry and gets the back of her ute piled up for something like $20 or $30.

What about landscape supplies, is there one nearby? They might be able to give you a better price on the quincan. You might just need to bag / bucket it yourself if you're just getting a small amount.

If Lyn says in her book that scoria is suitable, then it must be. I can see no reason why it wouldn't be, as the drainage would be excellent.

If your medium is well-drained, there's no need to be too worried about pot size. If I'm potting part grown pups I will put them into 7.5 to 10cm pots. Most others I simply pop into 15cm pots. The larger growers such as your blanchetiana, Aechmea rubens etc are going to need a bigger pot or you'd be forever picking them up after they'd fallen over. A 20 or even 30 cm pot would not be out of the question. When potting their pups that don't have much root yet, a tall pot can come in handy for supporting the plant while its roots develop. Simply plant into a small amount of mix in the bottom of the pot, and then repot into deeper medium once its roots establish if you're worried about overwatering. I've grown them in the 400 mm yates tuscan pots with no problems whatsoever.

Best go bring in some firewood before it gets too dark. The last few nights have been quite chilly, there's obviously ice somewhere. Weatherzone is saying inland Australia can expect near freezing temperatures this coming week, so I hope you all have your woollies ready.

Pam

Pam



springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 27, 2011
2:16 AM

Post #8590106

Thanks Nev, yeah I guess it would get pretty chilly down your way, brrrrrrrrrrrrrr, we were complaining this morning and it was about 14 degrees, lol, still only had shorts on mind you, actually quite a funny look, shorts, t shirt and ugg boots, hmmmmmmmm.
What can I say we live in a big liveable shed and floor is just concrete, it gets cold under foot ;)
thanks Pam for all your advice too, yeah we don't have a trailer, trying to sell hubby dirt bike and that will buy us a nice trailer. We do have a ute but it's shiny new still with a hard top tonneau on it, so not ideal for getting a bucket load of rock in the back. Plus the only raw materials place I have found so far (might find another one yet) is about 2 hours away! ekkk. They do sell it by the 1/4 metre, 1/2 metre etc, but until we can get a trailer it is not practical, so looks like we have to go with bags for now :(
So is that red scoria the right thing or is decorative and not for broms? i would hate to go and buy the wrong thing. If we go with the quincan, what size do we get, 10mm? what is the difference between the two? Quincan and Scoria?
thanks for the tips about planting a pup low and the lifting it higher in the pot later, what a great idea. Makes complete sense.
Another question is will seeds germinate at this time of year? Or would I be wasting my time trying at this time when I do manage to get some seeds?
thanks heaps
Tash
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

May 27, 2011
3:08 AM

Post #8590130

Tash, I asked Sue that same question about a week ago and she very logically explained that if they didn't want to germinate now they wouldn't be flowering. When I looked around my garden there were quite a few Neos coming into flower so they must be happy to germinate in Winter. Wendy and I only put seeds down at the end of April and they are growing well, though maybe a bit slow. I was reading on one forum about a man who puts his seedlings on his heated water bed in Winter and sleeps on the couch. Now that's dedication (or obsession). Jen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 27, 2011
1:10 PM

Post #8591046

Hi everyone,

C'mon Tash, what's a ute for? It's a workhorse, so load her up and make it earn it's keep. Remember the first scratch is aways the worst.

I have an 1988 Toyota ute and it's the best thing I ever bought, I look on it as my "right hand man" and I'd be lost without it. Much better than a trailer as you don't have the problem of where to put it when you aren't using it. If you're worried about getting the back of the nice new ute scratched or dirty, there are heavy duty plastic type liners you can get that fit in the back to prevent this. They just slide in and slide out when you're finished, or you can leave them there.

Regarding your question about red scoria; brom's will grow OK in pretty well anything as long as it's well drained. To demonstrate this at one of our bromeliad workshops once, I showed four pups which had been equal in size when taken off the same plant. I planted one in my normal "brom mix", one in red scoria, one in chunks of polystyrene and one in chunks of charcoal.

After nine months, the size of the three plants in scoria, poly-styrene and charcoal were much the same while the one in the potting mix was noticeably larger. When I removed them from the pots, the roots on the ones in the charcoal, red scoria and poly styrene were more dense and much thicker than the ones in the normal potting mix.

This gets back to what I said in a previous post about most brom's being epiphytic, these roots were stronger as they were exposed to plenty of air movement in a very open media (similar to when they grow on trees) and were mainly being used as "anchors" to support the plant. It is said that these type of thicker, stronger roots take in very little food in the wild as their main job is to support the plant. The main source of food comes from the bird and animal droppings and debris that finds its way into the leaf axils and the central vase and rots down into a type of "soup" which provides a continuous feed of liquid fertilizer.

The plant in the normal mix didn't need to do this as there was food in the mix, thus the root system was not as large. Because the other three plants were grown under shade cloth, they didn't have the same access to debris and bird droppings that they would in the wild and were therefore starved of nourishment hence the reason for being smaller in size.

The thing you must remember is that scoria, gravel and similar substances are all inert and contain no food for the plant so you need to compensate for this with foliar feeding; but plants will grow in it, and as it is very well drained. I imagine it would also lower the possibility of rot due to too much water with plants growing in the wet tropics with the excessive rain during the wet seasons. Just remember they must have supplemental feeding.

The answer to the question on seed germination is yes, they will grow at this time of the year (even down here where it's colder) but they do slow down a bit when it's colder.

I also read that story about the bloke giving his water bed to his brom's and there was another bloke in New Zealand who used his electric blanket to warm his brom seedlings. I think they both have very advanced cases of terminal bromeliaditis!


All the best, Nev.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 27, 2011
3:14 PM

Post #8591258

I knew a fellow who used to overwinter his favorite orchids on his electric blanket too. It's certainly not the safest thing to do though. I've heard of people using just the heating mat from watera bed too, but that also has its problems, in that they're not meant to be used 'as is' - that is, they're designed to be buried under a substantial amount of water. If there's enough light there, the top of the water heater or on top of the fridge does provide some extra warmth for those plants that need to be mollycoddled.

Re your comments on mediums, Nev, I have, at times used potting mix with no apparent ill effect at the time, but during the several months of rain we had here over Spring and Summer, the few plants I lost to all the wet were in potting mix rather than orchid bark or chunky coir.

On the subject of the chunky coir, Nev (or anyone else,) it's getting near on impossible to find it here without added fertilizer. Do you think the added fertilizer would have too detrimental effect on the broms?

Pam
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 27, 2011
7:15 PM

Post #8591764

Hi everyone,

Pam - Usually the fertilizer in the coir peat is just described as being Nitrophoska. Now as there are many different types of Nitrophoska fertilizer, without knowing the N:P:K ratio it's impossible to say how it would effect bromeliads. I have heard very good reports from orchid growers who grow orchids in it but as bromeliad requirements are different to orchids I can't say how it would work.

I Googled "Nitrophoska" and after randomly looking through quite a few of the different types, the N:P:K in the ones I looked at were too high in Nirrogen "N" and too low in Potassium "K" to grow brom's with good colour. This type of high N and low K robs Neo's and Billbergia of their colour and for the best results the ratio should be the other way around i.e. Low N and high K.

High nitrogen fertilizers will grow brom's quicker and produce more pups but it will also produce thinner, longer leaves with more green than colour, instead of the nice compact colourful plants we are aiming for.

So unless you can find out exactly what the N:P:K in the fertilizer is, I would say be cautious.

All the best, Nev.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 27, 2011
11:09 PM

Post #8592108

Thanks Nev. I might continue to avoid it.

Pam
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 28, 2011
3:16 AM

Post #8592202

Pam, I use the coir mix for orchids (fert included), on my broms. I do add a bit of potting mix and pearlite, and a dusting of dolomite, and all my broms do well. When potting up the Neo pups, I like them to have a bit of fert to start with, to get them big, but then i pretty much don't fertilise them again. The coir mix is good for this. It suits my conditions well. If it s abit dry through summer, I will have to water a bit more, but in winter it stays quite dry. I had heard from another grower that it breaks down too fast, but I haven't noticed that here. maybe in extreme heat and wet it might?
I try to start my seeds germinating on the set top box. Wish the covment would give me another one! Its nice an warm, and I must put a thermometer on it to see how warm it actually does get.
Tash, I think scoria and Quincan are volcanic rock? Usually scoria is full of airholes, and is a much lighter rock than, say, river pebbles. 20kg might be a bit more than you expect, but still heavy! Will you mix in a bit of bark or something? 15 to 20mm bits will probably be fine.
Nev, I'd love a seedling of your Acanthostachys pitcairnioides, even if it does have backward facing spines! You can put your hand in, but you can't get it out! I like to have the 'set' he he. My Acanth. strobilacea doesn't look like your picture flowerhead, so it must be too early for berries, or they haven't set any. I'll keep looking. Its been spot flowering for months!
On trying to take a photo and getting the correct colour, use your hand (in front of what you want to take, and at the same level of focus) depress the shutter half way, which does the focus and light meter settings, then remove your hand and depress the shutter fully. Apparently cameras light meters are set for skin tones, and for some reason, this helps me to get most of my brom colours true to likeness, most of the time. The Gunpowder photo works because the beige shadecloth behind has had the same effect as the hand. I just focused off to the left of the plant, half did the shutter and then moved back accross to the plant. Try it and tell me how you go.
Did i already post this pic?
Werauhia sanguinolenta
Sue

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gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 28, 2011
3:36 AM

Post #8592220

I think you may have posted it recently Sue, but it's pretty spectacular anyway. Thanks for the photo tip - the colour issue has been bugging me for ages.

In my experience with the chunky coir, by the time it breaks down significantly the plants are usually well and truly due to be divided anyway

Pam

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 28, 2011
2:54 PM

Post #8593065

Hi Everyone,
I love reading this thread, lol.
Nev you gave us the biggest giggle, I got hubby to read your comments about the ute and we both had a good laugh :)
Yesterday was a funny story, we were about to leave to go to Bunnings when someone posted a 6x4 gal trailer for sale on Facebook, it looked great, so we debated on it and then ended up heading off to Bunnings to get bark and perlite, then Innisfail to look at the trailer, and then back to the raw materials place for quincan then home. Left home at 10 got back home at 6pm. Innisfail is a long way from home, about 2 1/2 hours away. The worst thing was... we hated the trailer, didn't buy it, lol. But we were laughing on the way down, hubby saying "you'll have to tel Nev that your bromelitis has cost us about $800 today" ha ha ha ha. But like i said, we didn't end up buying it. We'll find one eventually.
so needless to say we brought the quincan in bags, ha ha. We also managed to pick up a couple of broms from a lady with a private yard full and then on our way home, called back into bunnings and brought a really nice big one we saw earlier in the day, very much like the photo you posted sue, it's a Werauhia Sanguinolenta Rubra, looks stunning. Another new one to learn about, lol.
Thanks so much Nev for all the excellent explanations you make on things, I seem to understand brom roots a lot more now all thanks to you and clear way you explain things. All of you in here are wonderful, thank you.
Meet a lady yesterday, where we got a couple of brom pups from, but gee, she was a different lady, she knew "everything" one of those people. And when we got home, we noticed her pups have the fly speck scale!!! hmmmmm won't be going back there again, didn't really enjoy our visit at her place. Got two nice pups none the less, but will have to treat them and keep them away from the rest of ours.
Didn't get to see Lynn Hudson, haven't heard back from her and we ran out of time anyway, so that will be another trip to Cairns in the near future.
so today is chore day, lots of stuff needs doing around home, and then get onto making our own mix for the broms and getting them out of the dirt they are in.
I am thinking along the lines of 60% quincan 30% bark and 10% poly-styrene? would that sound ok? No one yesterday had charcoal. I also brought perlite.
Lyns ratio in the book is 3:1 scoria to bark. The lady yesterday said she uses 1 part gravel (she said horrible things about lava rock) 1 part potting mix and 1 part bark with a few bean bag balls.
Well I had better go, I will check back later and see if there are any comments on my proposed mix ration, lol. Any suggestions are most welcome :)
thank you all so much I'll take a photo of the new big black brom soon too, the one I mentioned above...werauhia... :) I have no idea how to pronounce any of the brom terms, need a pronounciation book, lol.
Thanks heaps, Tash
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 28, 2011
10:32 PM

Post #8593863

HiTash,

That sounds like a good open mix that should drain well and allow good aeration. I alway used small polystyrene pieces in my mix for small seedlings. Initially I did find that the small bean bag polystyrene beads were hard to keep suspended evenly through the mix and always seemed to roll to the edges of the pile during mixing. They also seemed to work their way to the top of the pot after a few waterings as well so I had to find a better way of doing things.

To try and find a solution to this problem, I experimented with a hand held vegetable grater, and grated some bits of broken polystyrene boxes as a trial. I found that because,they had rough edges they mixed in much better and stayed evenly suspended throughout the mix, so this is what I decided to use even though it was tedious to make.

Then I had a "brainwave", if the grater works, why not the food processor? So a few days later, I took the food processor out to the garage and set it up on the bench and started feeding bits of polystyrene into it. Wow! was this an improvement? There were little bits of polystyrene soon filling the food processor in no time.

I emptied it and started again and all was going well as I continually repeated the process. Just as everything was going so well, I tried to be greedy and put too much polystyrene into the machine and next thing I knew was it stopped and there was smoke coming out of places where smoke wasn't supposed to come out of.

I quickly switched it off, opened the front and back door to try and get rid of the strong smelling smoke and just as I removed the lid, a bit of a breeze came up and blew through the garage. For a minute it seemed like it was snowing and little bits of polystyrene granules were blowing all over the place as well as being stuck to my arms eyebrows and in my hair.

Just then my daughter came into the garage accompanied by the C.E.O. and that ended any further experiments with a food processor. I did finish off with a reasonable quantity of fine polystyrene pieces though.

All the best, Nev.
perke_patch

May 29, 2011
12:55 AM

Post #8593948

I also get polystyrene boxes from the supermarket and my grandson loves to have a job to do breaking it up when he has a sleepover. I keep a large tub of it all broken up to use when potting your pups. it is also good for padding out a big tub so you don't use so much potting mix. I don't mind breaking it up as we are potting. It doesn't take too long to fill a big bin or tub. it stops the mix from breaking down and forming a heavy mix. the stryrene will still be there in a year when taking off more pups.

I will wait till we get home next weekend to post photos of our new babies. we are using free wifi in parks and downloading or uploading photos uses the time up quickly.

yesterday I had a lovely afternoon visit with Sue and saw her wonderful garden. the real thing is so much bigger than I expected from my imagination putting the photos together. We love it here at Moonee Beach. if we were ever to live in NSW it would have to be here.

Wendy
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 29, 2011
1:39 AM

Post #8594004

thunderbolts and lightening, very, very frightening, oooh! waaahhh, its about to rain and me and my neighbour/friend spent most of the weekend doing the best cleanup the garden has ever had! I owe you one, Belinda! Heres the rain!
I do hope its not too heavy tonight , and that it doesn't mean the garden club can't visit tomorrow! I guess, on the plus side, the mulch is getting watered in and so are a couple of new plants and potted things.
Tash, how big were the 20kg bags of Quincan? That was a long trip for naught, but at least you had a nice drive. Fly speck scale is a bugger, and if you have your broms in a garden situation, it can be almost impossible to get rid of. Treating indiviadual plants is quite easy though, and I believe you Queenslanders can buy Rogor in a spray can from Bunnings, which is handy for small jobs. What sort of negative things were said about scoria? just curious.
Nev, I got a chuckle thinking of you covered in snow. I did the same thing to a blender once, (the smoking bit) but it has recovered and gone on to blend again. I just pull apart polystyrene by hand, to put in the bottom of large pots for drainage and to add bulk, (like Wendy said) I like the foam boxes for transporting broms in the car, so try to save them, and break up foam packaging, or the lids from brocolli boxes, which, incedentally make good backing boards for elkhorn and staghorn ferns.
June 1st is approaching. Would anyone like to start a new thread? All you do is go to the aussie gardening forum and scroll to the bottom of the thread list and start a new topic. The picture you put in will be there all month at least, so choose a good one that will make people look at our thread. Just use the same heading, but change it to June 2011. If you know how to do a link, paste one here to the new one, and a link in the new one to get back here. If you don't know how to do the link thing, someone else can do it. Have a go! Let us know if you're going to try, so we don't have 5 new threads by different people. he he.
Had to show you Leo today. While we were raking up, he plonked himself down in the sun, right where I was raking so i covered him in leaves. He stayed put for about an hour! Strange dog. The photo is titled 'Leave' me alone! he he
Sue

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dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

May 29, 2011
2:36 PM

Post #8594998

well this group was just what I needed to cheer me up :)
Nev - I had a feeling when you started describing the blender incident that it might not end well.
I killed one making turtle food years ago, mincing ox heart was just too much for it.
Sue- I hope the garden visit goes well, I thought they looked pretty good back in October.
You've put so much more work into them since then I am sure everyone will be just as impressed as Baz & I were.
Tash - I am enjoying reading all your questions and the answers, I am a complete novice with broms and only have a couple of bilbergia nutans here, fortunately a hardy plant so great for someone like me.
They are growing in cactus & succulent mix, one day I'd like to get some more broms, once I have a conservatory to keep them in.
Summer here can be hot, by NZ standards anyway, but winter is freezing, we had a nice frost this morning but it means a sunny day to warm things up.
I moved one of my pots last night (so it would stop tickling me sitting next to it) & noticed that a flower spike is coming up.
this is on the one that didn't flower last year, they have pretty flowers & i am looking forward to when mine have clumped up enough to have multiple spikes flowering at the same time.
cheers - Teresa

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 29, 2011
4:47 PM

Post #8595231

mumble mumble mumble, I just wrote the longest post, and had two words to go when my toddler just pressed a key and lost the whole lot! wahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh, think I might throw myself on the floor and have a tantrum. counting to ten...1 and 2 and...

ok so where was I?

First was Nev, I said how hubby and I both killed ourselves laughing about your story, I could really imagine it all, so funny. That also brought me to the fact that I am a bit concerned that my polystyrene might be a bit too big, I used polystyrene boxes and got daughter to break them up into small pieces as punishment for her earlier behavior, but I hope they aren't too big.
Oh I didn't take a photo of our new brom, but I will do one today.
Teresa I'm glad you like all my questions, lol, I keep worrying that I am asking too many and annoying everyone :)
I do have another one... everyone run, she's asking yet more questions ;)
It's about two of our Neos, not sure what they are, but we have two big ones that had already flowered when we got them, and have given us probably 5 or 6 pups so far.
But the question is for further reference really, but i'm wondering if we have too much water in ours? I am always told to keep the center cup full of water with all our broms, so we do. But how would a flower (in the middle of a neo) get polinated if it was under water, lol. so therefore that must mean it has too much water in it? So should the prickly little flower in the middle be underwater or sticking out of the water?
Oh Nev you might remember even the photos of the Pink Senstation with old flowers in it, are about an inch or more underwater. (is that right, should they be that far underwater?)
The flowers in ours are old and not in flower as such, so I guess it doesn't matter for these ones, but just so that I know for any others that flower in the coming years.
After I read about the seeds Nev, in your book, hubby goes roaring off outside, with a torch, no he couldn't wait til the morning, and he wanted to see if these Neo's had seeds in their old flowers. Needless to say he just got all stinky and yukky and the whole flower, not just a little bit of it, but the whole flower for the centre of the neo pulled out when he tugged on it!!!! I was not impressed. He swears he didn't pull hard, that it just fell out basically, and boy it smelt sooooooooo rotten and disgusting. So i was wondering if all that water just rotted the flower out? But again, we don't know when it flowered, could of been over 12 months ago, no idea at all. So we now have one neo with it's old flower still in it and the other that just has a big open hole in the middle where it's flower use to be, not so attractive, lol.
So any advice on that for me :)
Thanks so much and I'll get a photo of our new brom today, forgot yesterday. I have forgotten what else I wrote before, better send before my rat bag hits another key on me :)
Thanks heaps Tash
oh here is the neo that hubby pulled the whole flower out of... so it no longer has the old flower in it now (but the other one that is exactly the same still does)

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 29, 2011
5:22 PM

Post #8595322

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1185616/
a link to a wet garden visit.
Sue
Tash, it sounds like that flowerhead was waaaay past it! Tell hubby not to fret. I think its better to pull the stinky things out anyway!
gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 29, 2011
5:35 PM

Post #8595359

Yes Tash, if the middle pulls out that easily, it's rotting anyway, so is best removed. At least it will continue to grow its pups, rather than rotting away.

Pam

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 29, 2011
6:57 PM

Post #8595521

thanks Sue and Pam, I feel so much better now, he he.
I have just been outside back into the repotting, but had to come for the little fellas snooze... but I think I found one that is starting to flower, he he he, all excited now, it will be the first ...Neo I think it is that I will see flower. All the ones we have that have already flowered did so before we owned them.
so I guess I best get this water question sorted out... cause as it is right now, the flower is about an inch underwater! Only reason I even knew ...well think ... it's starting to flower is cause i just repotted it and while washing it out carefully with the hose, I noticed the green prickle flower and it doesn't look old and yuk like the others, so I'm guessing that's cause it's new not old?
I'll attach a couple of pics.
Thanks for the link to your garden Sue, wow you have a beautiful garden and property, i really loved the photos, thank so much.
Here is a photo of the flower...sorry no idea what sort of brom...a Neo I think...that's as much as I know (***blushing****)

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 29, 2011
7:01 PM

Post #8595528

This is a photo of the brom itself, this was after potting it up in it's new brom mix... no more dirt :)

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 29, 2011
7:06 PM

Post #8595536

And then this one is after I watered it. It was only dry in the first shot because I had just re-potted it. So now it's an inch underwater... can't see that being right????
Thanks heaps, Tash

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 29, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8595557

Oh nearly forgot the photo of the new brom, it's a...
Werauhia sanguinolanta Rubra I have no idea how to pronounce any of that, but I'm sure you'll all know what it is :)

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

May 29, 2011
11:20 PM

Post #8595843

Hi tash, thanks again for your kind words. I think your brom is a Neo, and a large one at that, but I've no idea for a name. I don't think it is of any consequence that the water is over the top of the flowers, but if you want to see them develop, and keep the pollen dry for playing with, you might want to tip out some of the water, just to expose the top of the head of flowers. It may grow out a little more by itself yet. I had trouble working out if it was a new or past flowering part, but I guess wait and see. the flowers should be open about 8-11am when they do.
Your Werauhia is Black! Very nice. Mine seems to go quite red, maybe a little tooo much light on my part. I pronounce it like 'We-row (like the argument)-ee-a sang-goo-in-a-lent-a. I think if you just sound things out, the way they are spelled, most people will know what you mean, and it means you will know how to spell it when you want to write labels.
Gosh, I've been in DG alot today! I can't believe it hasn't kicked me out once. Fingers crossed.
Sue



This message was edited May 30, 2011 5:21 PM
perke_patch

May 30, 2011
2:58 AM

Post #8596011

I just typed a whole speal only to lose it all when I hit send so this time I will just say to Tash, don't use treated timber if you decide to put up a shade roof over your broms. The copper in treated timber will leach out in heavy rain and poison any broms it drips onto. We've all probably been there and done that at some point and learn from that mistake so if we can stop a new brom nut from doing it we will be happy.

Wendy
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

May 30, 2011
3:39 AM

Post #8596035

Wendy when I was going to get my SH built I was lucky enough to have all the brom-nuts as cyber friends and they told me what to build with too. [or rather my son] He had already done his with treated timber but painted all his wood as he went. His broms are fine and he hasn't lost any yet, so the paint must stop the wood from leaching. hope so anyway. While he was up here here honed out some more palm logs for me, so I've got heaps to do. It's great to see the questions that you ask Tash as I'm learning from them too. I don't think that I'll get into the seedlings just yet as I have so many Brugmansia seedlings still coming on and I just haven't got the time. There needs to be at least 3 of me and there isn't.lol Colleen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 30, 2011
2:12 PM

Post #8597412

Hi Everyone,

Tash, to answer your question about the amount of water in the vase of Neoregelias, think about what happens in the wild. Sometimes they are full of water which could cover the flowers completely and sometimes the water level is very low with the flowers fully exposed. People say that with the vase type brom’s you should keep the vase “full” of water; this is not quite correct, yes you should keep “some” water in them but not full to the brim “all the time”. You partly answered your own question when you said “But how would a flower (in the middle of a neo) get pollinated if it was under water, lol. so therefore that must mean it has too much water in it?”

In the wild, the vase in these vase type brom’s serves various purposes, firstly it provides a home for small frogs, a breeding ground for mosquitoes and other insects that live in the water and it also provides a place for some animals and birds to drink from at certain times of the year. As far as benefits for the brom. itself, it provides an ongoing source of food.
In nature it catches fallen leaves and bits of other debris as well as bird droppings and the droppings of frogs, tadpoles and insects that live in the water within. As this all gradually breaks down it combines to form a “soup” in much the same way as you could make yourself by putting old weeds, manure and grass in a drum and covering it with water for a few weeks. After a while it starts to “pong” as it breaks down and becomes a liquid fertilizer which you can dilute and use on the garden. In the vase of the brom., the same thing happens, and provides a continual source of food due to this process, except in times of drought.

During this time when there is no water, the plants survival mechanism kicks into action as it sees the food supply drying up and its existence threatened. To survive, it flowers in an attempt to make seed to reproduce. Because it flowers at a time when there is little or no water in the vase, the flowers are exposed and provide easy access for pollinators, the main ones being small humming birds and ants. As we don’t have humming birds here in Australia, this job is taken over by Sunbirds in the North of the country and Honey Eaters in the South; ants we have in abundance and they can be found anywhere. Those of you who got my little booklet may have noticed (on page 6) a picture I took of an ant in the actual act of pollinating a brom flower in my own back yard.

So what I do in my own collection is to allow the vases to get whatever water falls in them naturally and during watering and only tipping some out if they are in flower and I want to pollinate the flowers for seed. In this case I empty the vase, move the plant to a place where it can’t get overhead water, pollinate the required flowers and after a couple of days I return the plant to its original location.

As for the “stinking” dead flowers that hubby pulled out, he could have got the same smell by pulling out a handful of rotting grass from the liquid manure drum mentioned above because after those flowers died, they began the natural process of rotting and breaking down to add to the liquid manure in the vase of the plant, just the same as the brew we made in the drum above.

I never bother to remove any dead flowers from the vases as I don’t see them as doing any harm, but I will occasionally give the vases a good wash out with the hose just to remove any toxins that may have accumulated there. I do live twenty minutes south of a heavy industrial area and although the pollution has greatly improved, there are still some pollutants in the air as well as the salt from the sea breezes we get being just one street back from the ocean.
Sorry it took so long to answer your question, but as you are keen to learn I thought I’d give you the “lot”.

All the best, Nev.

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

May 30, 2011
4:56 PM

Post #8597773

Good morning everyone, thanks for the replies :) Thanks Wendy for the tip and thanks to you too colleen, I love all the information.
Nev... I have to love your explanations, never worry about giving me too much info or it being too long, I LOVE your explanations and the always want "the lot" as it doesn't just answer my question it totally explains it to me which means I really understand what you are saying and it just sinks in better. thanks heaps for the whole explanation about the wild and how the cycle works, that makes so much sense. thanks heaps, i have copied and pasted it to my collection of Brom information in my word document :)

Ok so I'll be off to tip some water out in a minute, lol. so just to check though, you said once you have pollinated the flower, you wait a couple of days and then return the plant to it's usual location, so does that mean once it's done flowering and the pollination is done, that it's ok to go back to being full of water again? Or should I endeavor to keep the water quite low still? Also, from this pollination until seeds form, am I right in remembering that this can take 6-12 months...or was that for the flower spikes?
If that photo I showed was infact the start of a new flower...as i think it is...it will be my first one I'll see go through the flowering process and I'd love to try and get my own first seeds...so I just want to make sure I do it all right if I can.

I have another question...yes I'm full of questions...gee i must of been an annoying child he he he.
It's a fertiliser question and I am worried I have been told this and lost it in my info, or just need to re-read...so maybe I'll being lazy asking this one...
But the new brom has all this slow release fertiliser granules in it's pot... I have never used any fertiliser on my broms so I'm not sure what to use. The neighbor uses seasol around the leaves, but doesn't get it in the cup, actually I have actually done that about twice, but then got worried I was doing the wrong thing, so haven't done it in ages. I have read about two sorts in Lynn's book, but haven't found then yet, and they are liquid ones, but what slow release one should I use? Or should I at all? Just when I saw the new one with heaps in it's pot it made me think I should be adding some.
I remembered your comment Nev, "The thing you must remember is that scoria, gravel and similar substances are all inert and contain no food for the plant so you need to compensate for this with foliar feeding" so that's what brought me to the whole fertiliser questions :)
Lynn lists Manutec bloom booster as the nitrogen is quite low but to use at half strength and also another one called A.B.S bromeliad nutrient, but sounds a little harder to find. she does mention giving some slow release pellets, but unless I missed it, she doesn't say what to use. so far i have not found anything yet, but will be on the hunt soon...once you all give me some much needed advice and direction :)
Thanks soooooo much to you all,
Tash
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

May 31, 2011
1:00 AM

Post #8598519

Hi everyone,

Tash, first of all, if you haven't flowered a Neoregelia before you may be a bit disappointed as there are only usually one or two little flowers open at a time. Once the flower/flowers have been pollinated they will close up and the seed making process begins. As I said, after a couple of days the plant can be returned to its normal place in the garden as water in the vase won’t hurt anything now as the flower has been fertilized. In the wild no one is there to empty the vase or re-fill it, it just seems to happen naturally due to varying circumstances. However remember to put little tags in the flowers you pollinate because if you don’t the same thing that happened to me could happen to you (and if you want to find out what that was you need to read my little book). If you want the insects to do the pollinating for you, by all means keep the water level low enough for ants and the like to be able to gain access to the flowers, but remember the results could turn out to be anything as you don’t know what plants the insect has visited before yours and if the pollinator is a “honey eater” it could have come from plants a considerable distance away.

Now onto the fertilizer question. Whenever I buy a new plant the first thing I do is take it out of its pot and get rid of the mixture it’s in. The reason for this is so that I can pot it in my own mix and that way I know how fresh it is and exactly what’s in it. I know when to water plants of comparable size as they all dry out at the same rate in the same size pots and mixture. If you have different mixtures you have many different watering requirements which only causes confusion in my opinion.

A lot of nurseries that sell brom’s are not bromeliad growers and are just brom “re-sellers” and consequently put too much of the wrong type of fertilizer on the plants just to make them grow quickly. Unfortunately, most of the time the fertilizer they use most is a general purpose type designed for plants other than brom’s. Bromeliad fertilizer is different to most other plants as it generally requires a low nitrogen (N) and a high potash (K) which is the reverse to other plants. Also, it would be no good me telling you how I fertilize my plants as I will have completely different growing requirements to you, so it’s really a case of getting “local knowledge” by asking growers in your own area. If there isn’t any, you just have to do what I did and experiment with different things until you find what works for you. I have an article about fertilizers in general but I don’t know if I can attach it to this reply, if not I could email it to anyone interested. As for what type of fertilizer to use between slow release, controlled release, water soluble general purpose, or foliar feeding types. If you are using a very open mix such as scoria, I think the slow release and controlled release would fall through the gaps in the mix and finish up on the bottom of the pot. That’s very good for feeding the ground beneath the pot but not much good for the plant in the pot.

ABS nutrient is a very good fertilizer specifically made for bromeliads and is manufactured in Qld. I have used it myself with good results but unfortunately freight costs make it too expensive for my use down here.
HORTICULTURAL SOLUTIONS,
P.O. BOX 213,
CAPALABA,
QLD
4157
PHONE/FAX 3206 0037 – MOBILE 0419 710 634 ask for Wolfgang

I have used the other one you mention called Manutec Bloom Booster with good results also. Down here it is easily obtainable at Bunnings but it is now in a new package, so if you’re looking for the familiar orange coloured packet you won’t find it as it’s been changed to pink.

Looks like I’ve used up too much space once again so for the rest of the info I’ll try and attach it or I’ll have to email it.

All the best, Nev.

Sorry, I can't attach it, wrong format!


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gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 31, 2011
4:03 PM

Post #8599880

In a moment of temporary insanity this morning, I forgot that I shouldn't be taking off pups in the cool weather and decided to pot the one baby that I had removed from my alcantarea imperialis rubra (the one I removed a few months ago and managed to get with no roots whatsoever. It's been happily sitting in a leaf axil until now, forming a lovely set of roots for itself) and remove a couple more. In all I ended up taking off the three biggest ones before I remembered the thing about the cold. oops! Two of them I've snuggled back into the leaf axil, as their roots are very tiny. It worked with the other one, so when you're on a good thing ...

This one absolutely amazed me - as you can see, it's still fairly tiny itself, but already has SIX pups of its own!!!! I'll pot him up and sit him in a propagating box on top of the water heater. I'm desperately wanting to get a single tray thermostat controlled heated propagating tray. I have a four tray one, but have rarely used it to date, simply because it's so big. The way this winter is shaping up though it may end up getting a bit of a workout after all, even if it's just to give some vegie seedlings a head start. Those things in the shops really struggle to qualify as food I think sometimes.

Pam

PS I tried to make some of the text bold, but html didn't work. Can any of you clever people who do such things tell me how it's done here please?

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

June 1, 2011
12:35 AM

Post #8600678

Hi everyone,

Pam while you're asking computer questions, I have one also: Is there any way I can attach a document to a message?

I tried the same way as I attach pic's but it told me it was the wrong format ?????????????? that's it for me, not very computer literate in fact very computer illiterate.

All the best, Nev.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

June 1, 2011
12:40 AM

Post #8600680

I don't think there is, Nev. The only way I can think of that you might be able to do it is by having it stored online somewhere, and then linking to it. I have not used it myself, so I'm not certain, but Hubby uses Google docs, and I get the impression he can store documents online there.

Pam
gardengal
se qld
Australia

June 1, 2011
12:48 AM

Post #8600682

Another thought, if you wanted to do so you could simply open your document, copy the whole thing and paste it into a post... edit>select all>copy.

As for attaching it in the same way as a pic, (given that it's impossible to remove them if you later decide to do so,) given that your material is copyright to you, I think I'd be hesitant to do so, even if it were possible. While you share your knowledge and experience so willingly (you're a legend! :) ) there are always those who will take advantage for their own benefit. If it's not permanently on the site in the way that a picture attachment is, you can remove it if you feel the need to do so, by simply editing the post.

Pam
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

June 1, 2011
12:08 PM

Post #8601775

Good morning everyone

Hi Pam, thanks for the feedback, I don't feel quite so computer illiterate now. The reason I though it would be a good idea was that it wouldn't take up so much space on the thread for members to have to wade through.

If I answer a question in the future and if anyone wants more detail, just ask and if I have something more indepth I will email it.

All the best, Nev.

Prickly but nice - Aechmea recurvata x Ae. recurvata seedlings first flowering

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

June 1, 2011
2:13 PM

Post #8602024

oh beautiful splinter. My aechmea recurvata is starting to flower.(think thats its name if i can remember correctly)

Thumbnail by breeindy
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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

June 1, 2011
3:00 PM

Post #8602148

Oooh, wow, Nev, what a beauty. Shame about the prickles though. Breeindy, my Ae recurvata is in flower now too. Must get some pics of it.

No others in flower now though. Boring lot they are.

Karen

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

June 1, 2011
3:38 PM

Post #8602221

good morning everyone :)
I have had a busy couple of days.
thanks so very much Nev for all the fertiliser information, it's exactly what I needed :)
Now don't laugh too hard, we are having a very cold morning this morning, it's 11 degrees! ha ha ha ha, yes that's very cold for us ;)
Well we have most of the broms repotted, just got a few big ones to go. They look so much nicer in the new mix and in smaller pots. Oh the things you have all taught me so far is just amazing. I now clean up the bottoms of them the way Lynn explained in her book, to expose but not damage the little node underneath. and planting pups, we used to just cut them off, and if they didn't have roots, which is quite common, we just used to literally plant them in a pot. Now we know to clean up the bottom to allow the roots to come through more easily, and some of the bigger pups we repotted still had no roots, but the roots were growing upwards trying to escape from under the little leaves at the bottom of the pup. gee it makes much more sense now and I really think we'll start to see some rewards and differences in our broms.
Next trip to the big smoke I will get fertiliser and then we'll be all set :)
Hope you are all having a great day, Tash
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

June 1, 2011
3:58 PM

Post #8602270

Hi everyone,

Breeindy, yes your plant is an Ae recurvata albeit one of the smaller ones know as Ae recurvata var benrathii

All the best, Nev.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

June 1, 2011
4:17 PM

Post #8602300

ahhh hindsight is a wonderful thing...
after reading about removing smelly rotten flowers I found one at work that had rotted before the flower even properly formed, too cold, too wet...
thinking I would be clever I tried to remove the icky flower, got a leaf come cleanly away, tried again and lo & behold the entire centre of the plant has pulled out - leaving a nice clean 'bowl'.
Oh dear that was a bit extreme.
There is a pup on the plant - quite a big one...
I don't think anyone will notice what i have done - the plant is stuck out of sight in the library, at least they put it next to a window to get good diffuse light.
I was sorely tempted to liberate a pup but now having read the info about not doing so in the cooler weather will leave it.
-1 C frost and the worst is yet to come...
winter is here.
gardengal
se qld
Australia

June 1, 2011
11:20 PM

Post #8603211

Using Google Documents to attach a file. I'll be interested to hear whether it requires others to be signed into Google to access it.

Pam

[HYPERLINK@docs.google.com]

This message was edited Jun 2, 2011 4:20 PM
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

June 1, 2011
11:50 PM

Post #8603232

Hi everyone,

Dalfyre, sounds like a bit of crown rot you have there and probably from a combination of too much water and cold temperatures. You did the right thing removing the rotten bits. Pull out any other leaves that come away easily and then give the centre a good flush out.

Tip out the water and let the centre dry out for a day or two and then put some clean (room temperature) water in it and the pup should be fine. You don't need to remove it from the main plant as that's probably finished now anyway but the pup can still draw strength from it. Besides now the centre is gone it may just fool the plant into producing another pup.

Also while the weather is cold I'd pull it back from the glass a bit as next to the glass can sometimes be almost as cold as the outside temp (just feel it) and the cold can transfer easily from the glass to the plant if it's too close, even though it's inside.

Finally as the original plant dies, just progressively remove the dead bits.

Pam - That works fine, aren't you the clever one? Now I need some simple step by step instructions for computer illiterates (In simple easy to understand language that isn't computer "gobbly gook" please)

All the best, Nev.

gardengal
se qld
Australia

June 2, 2011
12:44 AM

Post #8603255

Heck Nev, if I can do it anyone can . lol

First up, if you haven't already done so, you'll need to create a gmail account. That's reasonably straightforward from the Google page. Once you've done that, and are signed into Google using that id, up at the top left is a menu accross the screen, 'images', 'videos',' maps', etc. Click on more, and select 'documents' from the drop down menu.

Then simply click create new document. Fiddle a bit with the options it gives you for text, pictures etc. The save, button I have only just discovered, is at the top right. When you're happy with it, and saved it, click on share and it will provide the url for the page. At some stage you will need to tell it who is to be permitted to see it. I just selected, 'anyone who has a link'.

If you have any trouble with this I am happy to create a picture tutorial.

Pam

dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

June 2, 2011
5:15 AM

Post #8603433

Nev - the plant at work is on a table by the window so not close to the glass - and I have to double check but I think like all the new windows it is double glazed & slightly tinted.
I will keep an eye on the plant but if nothing else this is a good way to learn a bit about how to care for them & get some practice in for when I finally get some of my own.

breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

June 2, 2011
1:11 PM

Post #8604295

woops

This message was edited Jun 2, 2011 4:14 PM

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

June 2, 2011
1:13 PM

Post #8604297

Thanks splinter..yes i remember now that is what it is. Isn't your orange flowering one called that to though?
Do you think this is just way to sunburnt?, went awfully dark.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

June 2, 2011
4:04 PM

Post #8604633

Hi everyone,

Breeindy – No my orange flowered plant just plain Aechmea recurvata (at this stage) as opposed to yours which is Aechmea recurvata variety benrathii. Mine is a seedling as a result of a crossing between two different clones of Aechmea recurvata and subsequently all of the resulting babies are still called Aechmea recurvata.

This is similar to humans where as an example you have Mr. And Mrs. Smith who have four children. Even though the children are all named Smith, they are all different. To give them their own specific identity they are given a first name such as Bill, Bob. Ted or Alice.

It’s a similar story with the Aechmea recurvatas, the better /different ones are each given a varietal name to distinguish them from all of the others and save confusion, such as yours being Aechmea recurvata variety benrathii. It is still a recurvata but is distinguished by the addition of a varietal name.

If for instance someone wanted to get a plant the same as your Aechmea recurvata variety benrathii and they just ordered Aechmea recurvata, they could finish up with any of the recurvatas which may or may not look anything like the plant they want. This is why it’s so important to keep the correct full names of plants with them, so that you know what they are exactly.

If I wanted to distinguish my plant from all of the other Aechmea recurvatas, I could give it a varietal name which I would then need to register with the Bromeliad Cultivar Registrar at the Bromeliad Society International to make it official, but that’s another story.

As for the picture of your plant which looks to me to be either one of the Aechmea orlandianas or one of its hybrids, it isn’t sunburnt; it just has very colourful leaves due to what I suspect is from being exposed to very good, strong light. If it was sunburnt the leaves would show anywhere between a bleaching of the colour right through to the other extreme where they are light brown, dry and crinkly like brown paper.

All I can say is that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. Personally I like that colour, and many growers would kill to get that depth of colour in their orlandianas where others prefer the two coloured patterned leaves of a plant grown in much less light.

Now I have a couple of questions for you; what is the full name on the label of that particular plant, and do you have a pup which you would like to swap for one of a similar type?

All the best, Nev.
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

June 3, 2011
9:25 PM

Post #8607437

I think we need that new thread for June. As there have been no takers, I'll get one started. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1187000/
head on over and I'll see you there.
Sue

breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

June 4, 2011
12:45 AM

Post #8607634

Thankyou so much for going to the trouble of letting me know that Splinter. I didn't put a tag on that brom when i bought it and i can't remember what it was called but i did get in from ebay, i'll have to look through all my feedback and find its name. Sorry it doesn't have any pups ..yet. I'll let you know when it does. Love to swap for one of them orange flowering prickly ones like yours. Anyone know this one? It a pretty small grower. I'd say mini

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nikkidavis26
Delray Beach, FL

August 27, 2011
1:03 PM

Post #8779854

Hi everyone!!! Have not been on here for a while for the fact I went through a orchid depression Everything I had died on my and I gave up Sooo I had to come on here to get back on my grind and get back in the game and mabie get some help this time. Well let me start with a friend of mine had giving me several bromeliad aechmea blue tango and some gavriel jecan's from what they look like I think that is what they WERE. Well she had them in soil and gave them to me in full bloom with roots, The same day I planted them in soil and 2-3 days later the beautiful blue's and red's went to browns :(. Do you think they went into shock? Will they rebloom? How often do they bloom and how long do the blooms last? What do I need to do ? How do I find or get the seeds? The leaves are still green as I attatched some pics below Thank you for any help it is greatly appriciated You can also email me at nikkidavis26@yahoo.com

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

August 28, 2011
1:48 PM

Post #8781528

Hi Nikki. If you post this onto the latest brom thread I'm sure some-one will help you. Colleen
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

September 8, 2011
3:16 PM

Post #8799545

I had to laugh at that pic, look at all the lttle grave markers in the back ground!

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